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Tree appreciation thread


spunko
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Thought it would be better to start a new dedicated thread, inspired by the other one by @Great Guy.

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My garden, originally a neglected sheep field and before that many years ago a strawberry field and hop garden, desperately needed some tree cover to protect my house from strong winds.

When I moved in there was nothing except a handful of fruit trees and an old moth-eaten Larix decidua (European larch).

Interesting fact about the larch is that it's the only deciduous fir tree native to the UK, i.e. it drops it leaves/needles in winter.

LarixdeciduaPendula-drops.jpg

Not sure if this thread will go anywhere, sadly Prince Charles ruined the reputation of tree fans with his "I talk to trees" nonsense, it's almost like a dirty secret now. Anyone else "appreciate" trees, in a err non-sexual way? :S

 

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Larch is one of the more durable fast grown wood IIRC and a better option than most for fences, sheds and alike. 

Beech and beech woods are nice, the shape, the light through the leaves, the mass of leaves in the autumn.

Would say oak, except they are often an absolute state with limbs off of them all over the place and a total mess until they become mature. The rickety half dead specimens you see new plantations it is amazing any of them grow to maturity.

For ornamentals have a look at Magnolia starlight, stunning early flowers, quite a compact tree and will grow in significant shade, ours is under  another tree. There seem to be some with these slight curvy petals and others with a straighter bloom, prefer the curves.

179507.248502-magnolia-stellata-starligh

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Sasquatch

We had some lovely trees in a previous garden. Missed them when we moved to the city but our next house has trees again. It's quite overgrown but I think we have a mature beech tree and also a Japanese Acer in the undergrowth. We'll be planting a native hedge to screen off the garden from the garage. 

Gaze upon the photo below and have nice and calm thoughts..........

 

 

IMG_1805.JPG

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Silver birch are my all time favourite. Coming across a grove of them when out walking is always a magical moment. Absolutely beautiful trees.

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Just now, Hardhat said:

Silver birch are my all time favourite. Coming across a grove of them when out walking is always a magical moment. Absolutely beautiful trees.

Yes, I agree. They also signify new starts, and are often found as one of the first colonisers as they can grow pretty much anywhere. An old disused quarry near me was full of them, although they are not long-lived they start off the process and allow other trees to move in.

Have you heard of jacquemontii, it's a cross of several different silver birch cultivars and the trunk is perfectly white.

Birch%20Jacquemontii.jpg

 

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Mimosas I love at the mo! I've got one that produces purple flowers later in year, neighbour has a yellow one that is in full bloom already....I'll take some pics......I dug out a few of it's babies a few years ago and transplanted them into my garden but sadly didn't take.......lots of nut trees around too (small nuts) they spread like wildfire so don't get a lot of love....

Willows too, they're starting to bud and RIP my dead cherry tree that I accidentally killed by cutting it back too much :CryBaby:

Edited by nirvana
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Holly trees every day of the week for me. I love them.

Cant beat a good Holly hedge. 

Planted one out in October. 12 x 7ft  trees. Not cheap but worth every penny.

Like a bit of bush topiary too.

 

 

BFDF70D9-907E-4FBF-AACE-C49CDCA15AE5.jpeg

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On 23/02/2021 at 08:59, spunko said:

My garden, originally a neglected sheep field and before that many years ago a strawberry field and hop garden, desperately needed some tree cover to protect my house from strong winds.

Same here, although a field.  Planted a shelter belt in two sections with sheltered allotments between them.  Used a JCB to plant c.300 trees including sycamore, alder, rowan, birch and some evergreens.  All to help shade the house and allotment.  Lost virtually no trees, amazing!  Also planted another 50 or so: willows, copper beech, acer, firs, fruit, etc.

I have many others including very old oak but am currently having to cut a few more ash.  Apparently a bugger to cut once too dead as they can't be safely climbed.  Good news is you can try a pollard.  One I did looks ok.

I love trees and would like more land to plant more.  Must buy some more fruit trees asap - think the soil must be too wet in the current location.  Also need to transplant two this week.

 

Edited by Harley
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44 minutes ago, Harley said:

Same here, although a field.  Planted a shelter belt in two sections with sheltered allotments between them.  Used a JCB to plant c.300 trees

That's some garden, known as Fangorn in Old Entish.

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I've just done a quick calc of my no-gym training spreadsheet - a single tree branch in my neighbourhood has supported 4043 of my pull-ups since 3rd April with not a single creak or stress appearing B|

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The Grey Man

I think I am at around 4200 trees planted from around 2005 onwards.

A large variety. All with a variety of uses.

Some in the UK others elsewhere.

All under my rules. Naturally.

 

Edited by The Grey Man
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Just transplanted a two year old willow.  Not grown much.  Really hard to get a lot of the extended roots, especially the tap one.  Will be interesting to see how it does in its new happier place.  Rowan next, going to be even tougher.  Think I'll use the breaker!

 

 

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From an article I read years ago:

In the warmer parts of France, they plant a [forget the name] tree in front of the house. Not much foliage so it doesn't obscure the view much. It blooms at the height of summer and acts a sun screen.

Anyone know what tree it is?

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On 28/02/2021 at 13:36, jm51 said:

From an article I read years ago:

In the warmer parts of France, they plant a [forget the name] tree in front of the house. Not much foliage so it doesn't obscure the view much. It blooms at the height of summer and acts a sun screen.

Anyone know what tree it is?

Are you sure it's a tree and not a climber? I wonder if it's a bougainvillea.

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I'm pretty sure it was a tree although it is over 20 years since I read the article. Was in one of those magazines aimed at wannabe expats.

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10 hours ago, jm51 said:

I'm pretty sure it was a tree although it is over 20 years since I read the article. Was in one of those magazines aimed at wannabe expats.

Difficult to say, most trees bloom in spring. All I know is it won't be an oak, the French are quite fond of cutting them down and don't revere them as much as us Brits.

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Whatever it is, it's not a well known name.

A mate that bought a farm in Normandy got himself a huge table saw. Must weigh a good few tons. There was so much cheap oak for sale there that the saw was kept busy.

 

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Hopeful

I would only plant natives

But copper beech is nice

and I do also like Ginkgos

Edited by Hopeful
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Kurt Barlow
On 23/02/2021 at 10:51, Hardhat said:

Silver birch are my all time favourite. Coming across a grove of them when out walking is always a magical moment. Absolutely beautiful trees.

I always note their location. At TEOTWAWKI birch trees will be a useful source of sweet tree sap like maples and sycamores. 

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Kurt Barlow
34 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

I would only plant natives

But copper beech is nice

and I do also like Ginkgos

Would you consider Sweet Chestnut and Sycamore as naturalised? 

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Hopeful
13 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

Would you consider Sweet Chestnut and Sycamore as naturalised? 

Naturalised yes

I have a bit of a love hate relationship with sweet chestnut, nice fruit, nice wood, but fekking fast growing, shed big limbs for the fun of it, leaves are a mess, and the fruit can often be a disappointment because it can be maggoty.

Not a fan of sycamore.

non native Plain trees are nice, but I'm very allergic to the hairs they shed from their leaves. Like I've got pins sticking in my eyes. May in London around Carlton House Terrace is a nightmare.

Favourite trees

Oak, Beech, Ash (buggered by die-back), Whitebeam, Hawthorn, Wych Elm (buggered by disease), lime (but their sticky exudate is a pain), Silver birch, Cherry (suckers from roots can be a pain)

 

 

Edited by Hopeful
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Kurt Barlow
1 minute ago, Hopeful said:

Naturalised yes

I have a bit of a love hate relationship with sweet chestnut, nice fruit, nice wood, but fekking fast growing, shed big limbs for the fun of it, leaves are a mess, and the fruit can often be a disappointment because it can be maggoty.

Not a fan of sycamore.

non native Plain trees are nice, but I'm very allergic to the hairs they shed from their leaves. Like I've got pins sticking in my eyes. May in London around Carlton House Terrace is a nightmare.

Favourite trees

Oak, Beech, Ash (buggered by die-back), Whitebeam, Hawthorn, Wych Elm (buggered by disease), lime (but their sticky exudate is a pain), Silver birch, Cherry

 

 

Good and underappreciated source of sweet tree sap when we go Mad Max;)

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