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Rental nightmare in coastal Cornwall (and coastal Devon, IoW)


Frank Hovis
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stokiescum

But your all forgetting the elephant in the room regarding housing and that’s the sheer number of adults liveing alone.I’d guess there are more single mums than ethnics in many areas both push up demand for housing backed in many cases by the system paying the rent

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wherebee
32 minutes ago, Don Coglione said:

AirBnBs need to be wanked up to a reasonable standard and obviously fully furnished to command that sort of price, though?

nope, not necessarily.  I've seen airbnbs that were shithouse but commanded high prices - stayed in one in dublin in fact, on a business trip - because people want the convenience of somewhere to 'live' for a week and location means they'll pay it.  

In the dublin flat I stayed in, I think it was 1500 for 5 nights, paid for by a company, and it was real student digs stuff.  But - two bedrooms, a kitchen and a bathroom, and a home office for working.  In a hotel in Dublin centre to have a suite would have been much more.

For a family, especially with teenagers, hotels are eye wateringly expensive, to boot.  So I can see why landlords in the right places don't rent to tenants with all the potential nightmares that come with that - rent your place for six months in the summer, live there in the winter.

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On 31/05/2021 at 12:10, Wight Flight said:

It's no great surprise.

My place would go for about £1,300 a week as a holiday let, compared to £1,100 a month as a long term let (likely to be £1,500 next year though)

Edit but the Guardian is being misleading.

They are comparing the number of properties being used as holiday let against what is available now long term.

I bet there are more than 10k properties actually occupied by tenants in Cornwall.

 

 

Not for long now they can be evicted.

Cornwall has 10,000 Airbnbs but only 69 homes available to rent

Quote

The fear is that landlords are cashing in by kicking out tenants in favour of holidaymakers

Like those petrol stations than ramp up the price when there's a shortage, to get short term gains, these landlords will kick out decent long term tenants chasing the massive demand this year due to government ineptness making foreign travel too much of a ball-ache with the risk of rules changing every few weeks.

Cornwall will become like Sandbanks, full of rich wankers and the hired help having to travel in from cheaper less desirable areas, like Devon. xD

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Frank Hovis
7 minutes ago, BoSon said:

Cornwall will become like Sandbanks, full of rich wankers and the hired help having to travel in from cheaper less desirable areas, like Devon. xD

Tbh it's already gone that way; wealthy by the sea and poorer inland.  It has always been like that to a degree but it's suddenly accelerated over this last year.

Which is why when there isn't much in the way of local "inland" because the peninsula has narrowed - St Ives for example - hospitality can't recruit the low paid staff because they can't afford to live there.  Penzance has less of a problem because the town itself has lots of cheapish housing and social housing.

cornwall-map.gif

 

 

Meanwhile the council may finally have woken up to the fact that a genuine housing crisis is imminent so they can stop wibbling on about a non-existent climate crisis and actually do something.

 

 

The former councillor in charge of housing at Cornwall Council has warned the new Conservative administration that the current housing crisis is out of control.

Andrew Mitchell was the former Cabinet member for homes at Cornwall Council before the elections last month.

While the independent councillor was re-elected the Conservative group took the majority of seats and are now in control at County Hall.

However Cllr Mitchell has warned that those in charge will have to make housing their number one priority due to the current crisis in Cornwall.

With more and more people looking to buy properties in Cornwall the cost of housing has spiralled in recent months, and there has been a severe lack of properties available to rent.

And with the ban on evictions put in place by the Government during the Covid-19 pandemic about to be lifted Cllr Mitchell fears the situation is about to get worse.

He said: “It is like somebody has had a bonfire going for a while and has now thrown three gallons of petrol on it and it is now an inferno.

“We need to start looking at whether what is happening now is just a bit of overheating and will disappear as we come out of lockdown or if we need to accept that this is the new normal in Cornwall.

“We need to do something now, we can’t wait and we need to address this situation and work out what can be done to help those affected.”

https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/cornwall-housing-crisis-gone-bonfire-5483070

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14 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

Which is why when there isn't much in the way of local "inland"

 

From what I've seen the middle is mostly industrial (mining) or farm land and not a lot there other than roads to the touristy areas.

If the local council try to fix it by building more housing they'll get shafted by central government favouring the rich so all the 'affordable' housing either won't happen or there will be enough loopholes to allow the rich to buy them for profiteering as there would be too much money being left on the table by allowing local resident restrictions to artificially lower the price.

Government dismisses calls for second home owners in Cornwall to pay council tax premium

Maybe they could do something else like make the A30 and A38 toll roads that charge ever increasing amounts for non-local registered vehicles. Londoners getting put in the highest wealth tax bracket. xD

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sleepwello'nights
18 minutes ago, BoSon said:

 

Maybe they could do something else like make the A30 and A38 toll roads that charge ever increasing amounts for non-local registered vehicles. Londoners getting put in the highest wealth tax bracket. xD

The local cornish would love that, as soon as a tradesman knows you're from up country the price of anything trebles.

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stokiescum
31 minutes ago, sleepwello'nights said:

The local cornish would love that, as soon as a tradesman knows you're from up country the price of anything trebles.

Screw the emmets.ironicly it’s an English word not a Cornish one.

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Yadda yadda yadda
1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

Tbh it's already gone that way; wealthy by the sea and poorer inland.  It has always been like that to a degree but it's suddenly accelerated over this last year.

Which is why when there isn't much in the way of local "inland" because the peninsula has narrowed - St Ives for example - hospitality can't recruit the low paid staff because they can't afford to live there.  Penzance has less of a problem because the town itself has lots of cheapish housing and social housing.

cornwall-map.gif

 

 

Meanwhile the council may finally have woken up to the fact that a genuine housing crisis is imminent so they can stop wibbling on about a non-existent climate crisis and actually do something.

 

 

The former councillor in charge of housing at Cornwall Council has warned the new Conservative administration that the current housing crisis is out of control.

Andrew Mitchell was the former Cabinet member for homes at Cornwall Council before the elections last month.

While the independent councillor was re-elected the Conservative group took the majority of seats and are now in control at County Hall.

However Cllr Mitchell has warned that those in charge will have to make housing their number one priority due to the current crisis in Cornwall.

With more and more people looking to buy properties in Cornwall the cost of housing has spiralled in recent months, and there has been a severe lack of properties available to rent.

And with the ban on evictions put in place by the Government during the Covid-19 pandemic about to be lifted Cllr Mitchell fears the situation is about to get worse.

He said: “It is like somebody has had a bonfire going for a while and has now thrown three gallons of petrol on it and it is now an inferno.

“We need to start looking at whether what is happening now is just a bit of overheating and will disappear as we come out of lockdown or if we need to accept that this is the new normal in Cornwall.

“We need to do something now, we can’t wait and we need to address this situation and work out what can be done to help those affected.”

https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/cornwall-housing-crisis-gone-bonfire-5483070

The globalists will be happy when you've got favelas outside Truro.

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Onsamui
1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

Tbh it's already gone that way; wealthy by the sea and poorer inland.  It has always been like that to a degree but it's suddenly accelerated over this last year.

Which is why when there isn't much in the way of local "inland" because the peninsula has narrowed - St Ives for example - hospitality can't recruit the low paid staff because they can't afford to live there.  Penzance has less of a problem because the town itself has lots of cheapish housing and social housing.

cornwall-map.gif

 

 

Meanwhile the council may finally have woken up to the fact that a genuine housing crisis is imminent so they can stop wibbling on about a non-existent climate crisis and actually do something.

 

 

The former councillor in charge of housing at Cornwall Council has warned the new Conservative administration that the current housing crisis is out of control.

Andrew Mitchell was the former Cabinet member for homes at Cornwall Council before the elections last month.

While the independent councillor was re-elected the Conservative group took the majority of seats and are now in control at County Hall.

However Cllr Mitchell has warned that those in charge will have to make housing their number one priority due to the current crisis in Cornwall.

With more and more people looking to buy properties in Cornwall the cost of housing has spiralled in recent months, and there has been a severe lack of properties available to rent.

And with the ban on evictions put in place by the Government during the Covid-19 pandemic about to be lifted Cllr Mitchell fears the situation is about to get worse.

He said: “It is like somebody has had a bonfire going for a while and has now thrown three gallons of petrol on it and it is now an inferno.

“We need to start looking at whether what is happening now is just a bit of overheating and will disappear as we come out of lockdown or if we need to accept that this is the new normal in Cornwall.

“We need to do something now, we can’t wait and we need to address this situation and work out what can be done to help those affected.”

https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/cornwall-housing-crisis-gone-bonfire-5483070

I was a PA to a Chief Officer at CCC and I can tell you they are bunch of lazy pen pushers who were not fit for purpose.  Gritted my teeth for 5 years and got out by buying my own business.  Head of CCC at the time was always off sick, he left with a big fat payoff and got on the Board of Treliske doing very little I should imagine which was normally his MO.  Your really had to watch your back, I realized early on that keeping proof of everything was the best policy. When I left three managers and my boss all went on the sick because I had been doing their jobs and they could not cope.  My boss did ask me to go back and work for him as he took over a BT/Council contract, I just laughed at him and told him he could not afford me.

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Wight Flight

Our landlords have finally woken up.

A clueless mainlander put up a three bed place for £850 a month on a Facebook letting page.

Had 200 applicants in the first day, so has asked everyone to send in their financial position and best offer.

My guess is it will go for something like £2k, but sadly we will never know.

 

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Frank Hovis
16 hours ago, stokiescum said:

Screw the emmets.ironicly it’s an English word not a Cornish one.

Arguable.

I would describe it as a Cornish dialect word albeit not originally from the Cornish language.

 

However the use of 'emmet' to mean ants is actually from the Cornish dialect of English and is derived from the Old English word æmete from which the modern English word ant, is also derived (compare Modern German Ameise [ant]). The Cornish word for ant is actually moryon (pl. moryonen) 

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stokiescum
14 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Arguable.

I would describe it as a Cornish dialect word albeit not originally from the Cornish language.

 

However the use of 'emmet' to mean ants is actually from the Cornish dialect of English and is derived from the Old English word æmete from which the modern English word ant, is also derived (compare Modern German Ameise [ant]). The Cornish word for ant is actually moryon (pl. moryonen) 

Correct but I like to wind the black cross users up a real Cornish man and they do exist in the west will use Moryonen 

CDCBCF6B-995E-4DBB-9AE9-C2BAF9098A5B.png

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Frank Hovis

And inevitably, with the onset of summer, all the hotels and B&Bs want their rooms back.

 

This so far and it's only just June.

Olly Monk, Cornwall Council's cabinet member for housing, told CornwallLive the situation was a "crisis" and the council needed to come up with solutions as quickly as possible.

He said: "Last week about 130 people left temporary and emergency accommodation that the council provides at hotel chains and B&Bs for the reason that people wanted to get back to the business of providing hotel accommodation for regular, paying guests.

"The good weather, the bank holiday and the end of lockdown on June 21, hopefully, has meant those businesses want to get back on a regular footing of providing regular accommodation."

The Conservative councillor for Newquay Trenance said the council didn't have any long-term contracts in place with hoteliers so the businesses had the flexibility to terminate the contracts.

"Cornwall Housing managed to rehouse pretty much all of them," added the councillor. "A lot of them moved in with family or friends, some were rehoused in Plymouth.

"A very small number of people, discretionary claimants, who were housed in Cornwall during Covid who couldn't get back to where they came from during the pandemic have been offered accommodation elsewhere."

Mr Monk said he had not heard any reports of anyone being made homeless as a result of the move.

https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/crisis-cornwalls-homeless-moved-out-5490216

 

Moved in with family and friends = homeless.

Rehoused in Plymouth; that's going to work brilliantly for those with jobs or kids in school.

And this is only week one of the summer season.

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38 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

"A very small number of people, discretionary claimants, who were housed in Cornwall during Covid who couldn't get back to where they came from during the pandemic have been offered accommodation elsewhere."

Does not compute! :wanker:

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Frank Hovis
46 minutes ago, Wight Flight said:

It's a good idea IMO as it keeps down the prices of new builds.

That some may just flip onto second home owners doesn't matter as long as some locals are able to buy and live in them.

Tbh I'm surprised that the more popular parts of the IoW haven't already emulated this.

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Wight Flight
13 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It's a good idea IMO as it keeps down the prices of new builds.

That some may just flip onto second home owners doesn't matter as long as some locals are able to buy and live in them.

Tbh I'm surprised that the more popular parts of the IoW haven't already emulated this.

I doubt it would be popular. People are enjoying their 25% annual increase in wealth. They don't seem to want cheap newbuilds (or any newbuilds at all in reality)

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Frank Hovis
2 minutes ago, Wight Flight said:

I doubt it would be popular. People are enjoying their 25% annual increase in wealth. They don't seem to want cheap newbuilds (or any newbuilds at all in reality)

Well yes but they are sacrificing their children's futures.

I know two adults, brother and sister though both with partners, who have had to move back in with their elderly parents.

They are both early fifties but have been defeated by Cornwall's house prices and have basically given up.

I don't recall reading about this sort of thing happening at any time in the past.  These aren't skivers or druggies; these are people who have had reasonably good careers but bought (before a property crash abroad), or sold (out of the market, unable to get back in), at the "wrong" time.

As a further illustration of the lunacy I know a couple coming up for retirement who have sold their house and bought a lodge home (it looks pretty decent to me) clearing a net £250k for a happy retirement.  No kids.

Ten years ago their house would probably not have fetched £250k.

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With a crooked smile
1 hour ago, Wight Flight said:

Interestingly we are asking if Cornwall has the answer!

Interesting to see a ban on second home owners buying new builds. My brother lives in Oz he's only allowed as an immigrant to buy a new build and can't by an existing house. They see it as a way of boosting the construction trade. 

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With a crooked smile
Just now, With a crooked smile said:

My brother lives in Oz he's only allowed as an immigrant to buy a new build and can't by an existing house. They see it as a way of boosting the construction trade. 

This suits the Chinese population who are suspicious of ghosts in old properties. They don't like no 44 either as its viewed as double bad luck. 

Sometimes in Sydney they actually skip building no 44.

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Wight Flight
1 minute ago, With a crooked smile said:

Interesting to see a ban on second home owners buying new builds. My brother lives in Oz he's only allowed as an immigrant to buy a new build and can't by an existing house. They see it as a way of boosting the construction trade. 

I think that is how I would do it. Make a second home owner zone.

It worked well in the Algarve.

 

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Wight Flight
4 minutes ago, With a crooked smile said:

Interesting to see a ban on second home owners buying new builds. My brother lives in Oz he's only allowed as an immigrant to buy a new build and can't by an existing house. They see it as a way of boosting the construction trade. 

I would add that one don't think second homers are the real problem.

We have lost so many homes to holiday lets, whilst most of our hotels have gone bust.

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With a crooked smile
1 minute ago, Wight Flight said:

We have lost so many homes to holiday lets, whilst most of our hotels have gone bust.

The market has changed but I'm very anti Airbnb. I really think it should be properly regulated. 

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One percent
16 minutes ago, With a crooked smile said:

Interesting to see a ban on second home owners buying new builds. My brother lives in Oz he's only allowed as an immigrant to buy a new build and can't by an existing house. They see it as a way of boosting the construction trade. 

In my home town, over 70 percent of new build is sold as second homes. The issue is urban sprawl and it is completely destroying the feel and shape of the town 

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