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New water pipe / outdoor tap


spunko
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I've only got one outdoor tap and it'd be better to have a small tap for my veg patch and garden without having to run a hose everywhere. I am happy to dig a trench myself but does anyone know the regs in terms of depth? I'm assuming it'll need to be encased in gravel etc.

In regards to connecting it up to the existing water connection, there is a recently-laid blue plastic pipe going to my garage. Would I need to turn the water off at the underground meter thing, as it's before the stopcock in the connection, or do you just get very wet when you do it?

Approximate length of new pipe will be 8-10m.

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Bobthebuilder
43 minutes ago, spunko said:

I've only got one outdoor tap and it'd be better to have a small tap for my veg patch and garden without having to run a hose everywhere. I am happy to dig a trench myself but does anyone know the regs in terms of depth? I'm assuming it'll need to be encased in gravel etc.

In regards to connecting it up to the existing water connection, there is a recently-laid blue plastic pipe going to my garage. Would I need to turn the water off at the underground meter thing, as it's before the stopcock in the connection, or do you just get very wet when you do it?

Approximate length of new pipe will be 8-10m.

4ft trench with the pipe in a 4" waste pipe is what Thames water like to see, not that they bother checking these things out nowadays.

You can tee into the blue pipe. Always turn the water meter off, no way you will get the job done with 20 litres per minute flying out the pipe. Been there and got the t shirt, it was very wet.

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18 minutes ago, Bobthebuilder said:

4ft trench with the pipe in a 4" waste pipe is what Thames water like to see, not that they bother checking these things out nowadays.

You can tee into the blue pipe. Always turn the water meter off, no way you will get the job done with 20 litres per minute flying out the pipe. Been there and got the t shirt, it was very wet.

Thanks. Do I need to bother with the gravel? Part of it will be under a flowerbed so worried about digging it up, and I know that they insist on that hazard tape stuff but don't fancy that lasting for more than a few years underground.

I suppose if I do fork through it I'll soon know about it and can patch it up.

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Bobthebuilder
Just now, spunko said:

Thanks. Do I need to bother with the gravel? Part of it will be under a flowerbed so worried about digging it up, and I know that they insist on that hazard tape stuff but don't fancy that lasting for more than a few years underground.

The depth of the trench and the 4" waste pipe is to stop accidental damage but more so to stop it freezing. It's all a bit stupid really no pipe is going to freeze four feet deep in the SE.

If it was me, I would dig a trench, run it in 15 mm plastic pipe with bog-standard thermal lagging on it and just bury it with soil. I wouldn't bother with any gravel.

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Could go for a non-permanent connection - standard hoselock and flexi tail leading to the source end of your buried blue pipe and tap, that way could easily disconnect it easily if required -means you never have to worry about a hidden leak and disconnect over winter. Pretty sure for a fixed install like that you should have a non return valve installed, having said that most people have hoses permanently connected to outside taps without and back feeding from those just as much a risk.

Edited by onlyme
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2 hours ago, onlyme said:

Could go for a non-permanent connection - standard hoselock and flexi tail leading to the source end of your buried blue pipe and tap, that way could easily disconnect it easily if required -means you never have to worry about a hidden leak and disconnect over winter. Pretty sure for a fixed install like that you should have a non return valve installed, having said that most people have hoses permanently connected to outside taps without and back feeding from those just as much a risk.

Cheers. Non return valve was one of the first things I did here, can't believe that people don't notice when their drinking water tastes like it has been sat inside a hose for a few days (because it has!).

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7 hours ago, spunko said:

I've only got one outdoor tap and it'd be better to have a small tap for my veg patch and garden without having to run a hose everywhere. I am happy to dig a trench myself but does anyone know the regs in terms of depth? I'm assuming it'll need to be encased in gravel etc.

In regards to connecting it up to the existing water connection, there is a recently-laid blue plastic pipe going to my garage. Would I need to turn the water off at the underground meter thing, as it's before the stopcock in the connection, or do you just get very wet when you do it?

Approximate length of new pipe will be 8-10m.

I had a similar need as I got fed up watering with a hose pipe and was wasting water.  I used drip irrigation into 1" diameter tubes buried in the beds as it was far more effective and uses less water (direct to root level, no surface water).   Used for new trees and permanent flower beds of some serious length (well over 10m).  Buried the 13mm diameter feed pipe to the beds and had a hoselock connector to the outside tap (via a pressure reducer!).  Teed off the feed pipe with drip emitters and then into thinner tubes into the 1" pipes which went into the soil about a foot.  Added valves in various places to control the flow.  I can now just plug the hose in, turn on the taps, and the beds get watered while I sit back with a beer!  I believe drip feeders are often exempt during hose pipe bans!

PS: The heavy duty irrigation stuff, not the baby stuff used for hanging baskets, etc.  Choose the correct emitters for the required flow rate (liters per hour).  I can diagram if needed.

PPS:  If going the other way, speaking as someone who digs a lot, pea gravel is very useful as a warning.  Its main purpose is to to allow for some large (e.g. drainage, sewer, etc) pipe movement and support and is required for those kind of pipes.  Farmers around here use loads of blue pipe to connect to water troughs, etc sans such stuff.

Edited by Harley
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4 hours ago, onlyme said:

having said that most people have hoses permanently connected to outside taps without and back feeding from those just as much a risk.

Outside taps should have a non return valve fitted (water regs)?  Same with flexible bath shower heads, etc?

Edited by Harley
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19 minutes ago, Harley said:

Outside taps should have a non return valve fitted (water regs)?  Same with flexible bath shower heads, etc?

Sinks fitted with flexi head pull out tap heads another one that springs to mind,

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Bobthebuilder

Not a reply to the question as such but, I once saw a good solution to keeping hoses nice and neat in the garden. A standard hose will fit into 15 mm Talon pipe clips, drilled to a wall or fence to run down the garden. Much neater than just lying on the ground.

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1 hour ago, Bobthebuilder said:

Not a reply to the question as such but, I once saw a good solution to keeping hoses nice and neat in the garden. A standard hose will fit into 15 mm Talon pipe clips, drilled to a wall or fence to run down the garden. Much neater than just lying on the ground.

Excuse me, I'm middle class, so naturally I have a windy Hozelock retractable wall hanging thing.

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2 hours ago, Harley said:

I had a similar need as I got fed up watering with a hose pipe and was wasting water.  I used drip irrigation into 1" diameter tubes buried in the beds as it was far more effective and uses less water (direct to root level, no surface water).   Used for new trees and permanent flower beds of some serious length (well over 10m).  Buried the 13mm diameter feed pipe to the beds and had a hoselock connector to the outside tap (via a pressure reducer!).  Teed off the feed pipe with drip emitters and then into thinner tubes into the 1" pipes which went into the soil about a foot.  Added valves in various places to control the flow.  I can now just plug the hose in, turn on the taps, and the beds get watered while I sit back with a beer!  I believe drip feeders are often exempt during hose pipe bans!

PS: The heavy duty irrigation stuff, not the baby stuff used for hanging baskets, etc.  Choose the correct emitters for the required flow rate (liters per hour).  I can diagram if needed.

PPS:  If going the other way, speaking as someone who digs a lot, pea gravel is very useful as a warning.  Its main purpose is to to allow for some large (e.g. drainage, sewer, etc) pipe movement and support and is required for those kind of pipes.  Farmers around here use loads of blue pipe to connect to water troughs, etc sans such stuff.

I am planning to do that at some point, but I will probably go the full hog and get one of those clever Wi-Fi ones where I can operate it at work, when on holiday (?!), etc. They're not that expensive now.

But it makes sense to have a tap fairly nearby anyway IMO, to fill up watering cans or whatnot. It's always quicker than a hose.

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Bobthebuilder
14 minutes ago, spunko said:

Excuse me, I'm middle class, so naturally I have a windy Hozelock retractable wall hanging thing.

A pickpockets delight then.

I like these, millions sold around the world annually, simplistic genius. The shower head goes from a jet to soft shower with a twist.  We just have too much middle class shite in the west.

https://www.toolstation.com/brass-fittings-set/p30897

 

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