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WorkingPoor

NHS warns on social media trolls during terror attacks

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Seems to be a multi pronged concerted effort underway to silence the public on social media in the wake of terror attacks 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-41203920

Guidelines to staff, terror attack victims and their families to warn them about the risks of using socal media have been issued by NHS England.

The guide cautions that internet trolls may subject victims to "vile and upsetting abuse", as was seen after the Manchester and London terror attacks.

It also warns people to be wary of journalists, who monitor social media. 

But it adds that social media can also play a positive role in helping victims and families after attacks.

For example, it points out that coverage can help people by appealing for help, getting questions answered or paying tribute to those who have been killed.

However, it warns, people may say more than they intend to when "vulnerable, upset or angry" and that the process of retelling a story can make people "relive the worst parts" of horrific events. 

"Journalists' questions can seem very intrusive, and sometimes blunt," the guide explains, while warning that their tweets can be "seductive".

Edited by WorkingPoor

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1 hour ago, 201p said:

Never say anything on the internet, that you wouldn't say in real life.

Now why have people forgotten that? 

Sadly that's not true anymore, I'd say things to real life friends that I'd never put on social media.

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1 hour ago, 201p said:

Never say anything on the internet, that you wouldn't say in real life.

Now why have people forgotten that? 

That's the best general rule, although you have to define "real life".  In work there is the old, and pretty good, rule of "never discuss politics or religion".  That is a really good rule of thumb: effectively "keep it light".

I see the internet as being on a par with a lunchtime down the pub conversation your mates; more free and easy than at work but not at the eight pints (pick your own limit) confessional stage.

The nasty trolling death threats are deserving of punishment IMHO but the guy saying he wanted all muslims killed was just expressing his opinion however much you may disagree with it; radical muslims repeatedly call for death to all Jews and homosexuals but I've yet to hear of any twelve month sentences being handed out. 

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1 hour ago, 201p said:

Never say anything on the internet, that you wouldn't say in real life.

Now why have people forgotten that? 

The thing is though, if you went into work and said "third world migration has been a disaster for Europe and we should stop letting them in" you could be in front of human resources...

 

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31 minutes ago, Great Guy said:

The thing is though, if you went into work and said "third world migration has been a disaster for Europe and we should stop letting them in" you could be in front of human resources...

 

You'd also get avoided as that guy who keeps banging on about politics.

I know that someone in another team with whom I deal from time to time is a left wing activist who seconded one of the loony left candidates for the Labour leadership a few years ago.

I have heard this from someone else rather than her and despite it clearly being her big hobby out of work she has never once mentioned it because she follows the don't discuss politics rule.

As a consequence I will chat with her as I would with anyone else. If she started wearing a "Vote Labour" badge then I think HR would have a word with her.

It's a workplace; not a hustings.

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8 hours ago, WorkingPoor said:

Seems to be a multi pronged concerted effort underway to silence the public on social media in the wake of terror attacks 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-41203920

Guidelines to staff, terror attack victims and their families to warn them about the risks of using socal media have been issued by NHS England.

The guide cautions that internet trolls may subject victims to "vile and upsetting abuse", as was seen after the Manchester and London terror attacks.

It also warns people to be wary of journalists, who monitor social media. 

But it adds that social media can also play a positive role in helping victims and families after attacks.

For example, it points out that coverage can help people by appealing for help, getting questions answered or paying tribute to those who have been killed.

However, it warns, people may say more than they intend to when "vulnerable, upset or angry" and that the process of retelling a story can make people "relive the worst parts" of horrific events. 

"Journalists' questions can seem very intrusive, and sometimes blunt," the guide explains, while warning that their tweets can be "seductive".

I suppose the simple question is why are the NHS doing this and in what way is it part of their brief as a Health Service provider. 

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9 hours ago, WorkingPoor said:

This week also saw a Wrexham man sentenced to 12 months imprisonment for a facebook post in the wake of the Manchester Arena islamist terror attack 

 

Is he a danger to society? Or does he just need his internet turning off for a bit?

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