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Seasonal Diet


steppensheep
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steppensheep

I'm sure I started a thread on this years ago but can't find it. Someone even kindly posted an intimidating infographic about vegetable seasons.

 

I've realized anyway, that the vegetable part of the equation is actually fairly simple. Salad-y stuff in spring/summer, heartier stuff later in year. And despite half of it being imported, it's really fairly obvious what's in season. Tomatoes are €1/kg currently, I guess they're in season.

 

I think the more interesting stuff could be the macronutrients - calories, carbs, sugar/starch, protein, fat, as that could vary more significantly over the year and impact on the metabolism.

 

Meats: young animals early in year (light meat, chicken rabbit, veal) and old animals later in year (dark meat, beef, mutton, game)

Fish: probably similar, don't really know much about them. Salmon in autumn, otherwise white fish.

Fruit: July to September only.

Seeds, grains, nuts, lentils: autumn/winter.

Milk: tending through the year from fresh milk to jogurt/kefir, cottage cheese, hard cheese.

Root vegies: autumn/winter.

Eggs: spring.

Mushrooms: autumn/winter/spring.

 

I'll try and make concrete plans monthly.

 

June

Salad, tomatoes, cottage cheese, peas, fish strawberries.

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One percent
16 minutes ago, steppensheep said:

I'm sure I started a thread on this years ago but can't find it. Someone even kindly posted an intimidating infographic about vegetable seasons.

 

I've realized anyway, that the vegetable part of the equation is actually fairly simple. Salad-y stuff in spring/summer, heartier stuff later in year. And despite half of it being imported, it's really fairly obvious what's in season. Tomatoes are €1/kg currently, I guess they're in season.

 

I think the more interesting stuff could be the macronutrients - calories, carbs, sugar/starch, protein, fat, as that could vary more significantly over the year and impact on the metabolism.

 

Meats: young animals early in year (light meat, chicken rabbit, veal) and old animals later in year (dark meat, beef, mutton, game)

Fish: probably similar, don't really know much about them. Salmon in autumn, otherwise white fish.

Fruit: July to September only.

Seeds, grains, nuts, lentils: autumn/winter.

Milk: tending through the year from fresh milk to jogurt/kefir, cottage cheese, hard cheese.

Root vegies: autumn/winter.

Eggs: spring.

Mushrooms: autumn/winter/spring.

 

I'll try and make concrete plans monthly.

 

June

Salad, tomatoes, cottage cheese, peas, fish strawberries.

I’m on a seafood diet. I see food and I eat it.  xD

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Bobthebuilder

If you want to eat a proper seasonal diet grown and sourced in the UK, all your teeth and hair will fall out. Fucking mugs game. I know someone who paid £1500 for shooting rights for a year, got 2 pheasants.

It always amazes me that every 30 odd year old wants to live off the land and be Hugh Fearnly Whippingtool.

Cheese on toast is where it's at, with a nice bottle of red.

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1 hour ago, Bobthebuilder said:

If you want to eat a proper seasonal diet grown and sourced in the UK, all your teeth and hair will fall out. Fucking mugs game. I know someone who paid £1500 for shooting rights for a year, got 2 pheasants.

It always amazes me that every 30 odd year old wants to live off the land and be Hugh Fearnly Whippingtool.

Cheese on toast is where it's at, with a nice bottle of red.

Isn't half the point of the seasonal diet is that you're eating what the human body has evolved to eat at that point in the annual cycle.

In our developed world we don't really let our bodies experience the seasons any more -- heating, lighting, cooling, the same food all year round. 

Is this an issue?  I've no idea.    Maybe humans are best off living in a permanent autumn.  Or maybe it is a terrible problem -- perhaps in our modern world human bodies are forever storing up fat for a winter that never comes...

 

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Bobthebuilder
43 minutes ago, dgul said:

Is this an issue?  I've no idea.    Maybe humans are best off living in a permanent autumn.  Or maybe it is a terrible problem -- perhaps in our modern world human bodies are forever storing up fat for a winter that never comes...

Indeed, A permanent August springs to mind.

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21 hours ago, Bobthebuilder said:

I know someone who paid £1500 for shooting rights for a year, got 2 pheasants.

Wtf?!

I've hit more than that with the van, and I didn't pay a thing. 

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Bobthebuilder

A few seasonal stuff I like is,

January. F##k all.

February, Fish.

March,  purple sprouting broccoli.

April, Jersey royals.

May, Asparagus.

June, Strawberries, cherries.

July, Tomatoes.

August, Everything.

September, Sweetcorn.

October, Apples.

November, Squashes/ pumpkins.

December, F##k all.

To be honest, I love seasonal eating and have been into it for years. A good book I would recommend is The River Cottage Year by Huge furry Whippingtool.

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On 08/06/2021 at 22:15, dgul said:

Isn't half the point of the seasonal diet is that you're eating what the human body has evolved to eat at that point in the annual cycle.

In our developed world we don't really let our bodies experience the seasons any more -- heating, lighting, cooling, the same food all year round. 

Is this an issue?  I've no idea.    Maybe humans are best off living in a permanent autumn.  Or maybe it is a terrible problem -- perhaps in our modern world human bodies are forever storing up fat for a winter that never comes...

 

Healthiest thing is probably to eat the most nutritious stuff straight out the cargo hold of a jet plane if you aren’t bothered about food miles. Got to be far healthier than root vegetables with everything for a large part of the year.

There’s a reason our ancestors ate fruit and veg in season and made all sorts of preserves. It was because they hadn’t invented jet planes.

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Tomatoes aren't in season yet. You've got around a month before UK grown ones hit the shops. Are you going to limit yourself by country or by region? For example, Europe or just things that grow in the UK?

I think you're onto something, and this is something I tend to follow, albeit not by design just simply as a result of growing loads of my own food. But remember that some fruit/veg have VERY short periods of being ready to eat, for example purple sprouting broccoli, grapes and strawberries. They will only be in season/edible for a ~tenth of the year. Good luck getting grapes grown in Europe too (Greek eating grapes sometimes appear for a short period in Tesco).

It's doable as a general rule, but sometimes it's nice to buy a mango in January.

 

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11 hours ago, SNACR said:

Healthiest thing is probably to eat the most nutritious stuff straight out the cargo hold of a jet plane if you aren’t bothered about food miles. Got to be far healthier than root vegetables with everything for a large part of the year.

There’s a reason our ancestors ate fruit and veg in season and made all sorts of preserves. It was because they hadn’t invented jet planes.

I'm no environmentalist, but the idea of carting runner beans in from Kenya year-round on jet planes is completely ridiculous when they're not even that nice. It's a shame people can't do without, but that's life.

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15 hours ago, Bobthebuilder said:

A few seasonal stuff I like is,

January. F##k all.

February, Fish.

March,  purple sprouting broccoli.

April, Jersey royals.

May, Asparagus.

June, Strawberries, cherries.

July, Tomatoes.

August, Everything.

September, Sweetcorn.

October, Apples.

November, Squashes/ pumpkins.

December, F##k all.

To be honest, I love seasonal eating and have been into it for years. A good book I would recommend is The River Cottage Year by Huge furry Whippingtool.

A fine list. Although in December I would recommend Brussel Sprouts. People that don't like Brussel Sprouts have only ever tried those revolting frozen ones... fact.

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Bobthebuilder
20 minutes ago, spunko said:

A fine list. Although in December I would recommend Brussel Sprouts. People that don't like Brussel Sprouts have only ever tried those revolting frozen ones... fact.

I should have added parsnips to December as well, gorgeous roasted with Parmesan cheese.

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swiss_democracy_for_all
4 hours ago, spunko said:

A fine list. Although in December I would recommend Brussel Sprouts. People that don't like Brussel Sprouts have only ever tried those revolting frozen ones... fact.

Or don't know how to cook them. I must admit I don't bother much with them - I ate loads as a kid and they were awful because my Mum, bless her, was an old-school Brit cook. Years later as an adult I learned how to make them taste good, a revelation. With chopped shallots and bacon is the way to go IMO.

 

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One percent

I’ve got a fresh crab for my tea. Just making a loaf to make crab sarnies. :)

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steppensheep
10 hours ago, spunko said:

Tomatoes aren't in season yet. You've got around a month before UK grown ones hit the shops. Are you going to limit yourself by country or by region? For example, Europe or just things that grow in the UK?

I don't want to be obsessive about it. It's more for orientation. A month here or there is fine. 

 

10 hours ago, spunko said:

growing loads of my own food...

Look forward to your monthly recommendations.

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Bobthebuilder
3 minutes ago, steppensheep said:

Look forward to your monthly recommendations.

So if you are shopping tomorrow, on my list would be.

Jersey royals or similar.

Asparagus UK.

Watercress UK.

Good quality farmed trout UK.

Good eggs, Burford browns are my favourite.

 

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Van Lady
7 hours ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

my Mum, bless her, was an old-school Brit cook.

Mine was too. Veg boiled to mush.

Brussel sprouts are lovely stir fried with butter/a little oil with an accompaniment of choice e.g. almonds…..experiment!

Same with cabbage stir fried it’s lovely but boiled ….yuk.

I can eat both lightly steamed though.

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Need to be quick with the asparagus because you've only got about another week max of UK stuff in the shops, then it's back to Peru grown stuff year round.

Strawberries are at their peak now, and cherries just coming in. Don't buy cherries from the supermarket, they're much cheaper at those roadside stalls. Not sure if you have them across the UK but down here they're everywhere.

If you can get them, morello cherries are the best IMO. I had a huge old morello tree that blew down last year sadly. But I used to just stand there for 10-15 mins just munching cherries off the tree. Fucking amazing.

 

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6 hours ago, One percent said:

I’ve got a fresh crab for my tea. Just making a loaf to make crab sarnies. :)

Crab is a very good one to suggest tbh. It's still very much local, family / small business running the show, from what I read it's hard to farm crab commercially.

Shame that brown crab meat is rancid cos it's much cheaper.

BTW If you need any apples in September/October I always have a surplus. Last year I got them juiced, cost me £40 but I still have about 60 bottles left.

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humdrum
8 hours ago, spunko said:

BTW If you need any apples in September/October I always have a surplus. Last year I got them juiced, cost me £40 but I still have about 60 bottles left.

How?

Details please.

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swiss_democracy_for_all

Spunky you live in the pikey-infested garden of England, most of the country is too cold for morello cherry trees to do well, I think, so roadside stands with good ones will be limited to near you. They’re pricey this year here, the spring frosts wrecked the crop. 

 

I have a recommendation for anyone planting potatoes. If you have to go to the ends of the earth to get the seed potatoes, and you might have to, get Andean Sunside. They’re a complete revelation, so much nicer than normal potatoes you won’t be able to go back afterwards. Pity they’re difficult to get. 

 

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humdrum

I am always in two minds about this living in harmony with nature lark.

There is a lot of swapping of produce on the allotment so I get a fair range of in season produce. And since most of us creak onto our plots when we feel like it rather than we should, a lot of the stuff is past its best and starting to go downhill and tastes great. You know when a strawberry is ready because you have to brush the slugs off first.

So all to the good. The other day I found the remains of some brisket in the cook pot, added spuds and onions and parsnips and beans and rhubarb and something odd a friend had grown and which I did not like to refuse because she is officially blind, put it all in the oven and left it for four hours.

It was delicious.

The only problem was that I wasn't overly sure of the nutritional value because it was not in me that long. In fact, it was like turning on a tap.

It all rather reminded me of my hippy dippy days of self sufficiency and tables growing with great wedges of fantastic food and organic loos that you could smell two miles against the wind

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40 minutes ago, humdrum said:

How?

Details please.

I just took them to a local farm I heard about, you take your apples and then 2 weeks later they have juiced, pasteurised and bottled them up.

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33 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

Spunky you live in the pikey-infested garden of England, most of the country is too cold for morello cherry trees to do well

 

Well it's official then. I wasn't sure if I could ever live up north but now I know I can't.

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