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Frank Hovis

Remember this one - staffie dog kils owner while BBC film?

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Turns out the dog, yes the dog, had eight times the drug driving limit for cocaine in its body when it mauled its owner to death as he had an epileptic fit.

 

Quote

 

Terrier ate crack cocaine and then mauled its owner to death in front of horrified BBC camera crew which was interviewing him about drugs

Mario Perivoitos, 41, was attacked while he suffered an epileptic fit in his North London flat

A DOG mauled its owner to death after eating crack cocaine, an inquest heard.

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier named Major was the equivalent of eight times the human drug drive limit when he latched onto Mario Perivoitos's face and neck — moments after his owner took part in a BBC documentary.

 

 

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/4442672/terrier-mauled-owner-crack-cocaine-north-london/

 

Hoist by your own petards - dogs which are weapons high on your drugs.

 

dangerous-dogs-in-england-chloe-2.jpg

Cute, isn't he?

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A staffie on crack? Bloody hell!

Don't let weaponised dogs eat your crack, I think we can all agree that's a lesson we needed to learn. 

I wonder if him having a fit was what made the dog attack?

Is that a photo of the actual dog? It looks vicious enough without being on crack!

Shame for the guy though, even is he was responsible that's a horrible way to die.

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That's what they suggest:

Quote

 

The exact reading and measurement of cocaine was not stated but Mr Carmichael said: "It is very likely that this dog had consumed drugs, probably eaten them.

"It is almost impossible to say whether that will make the dog attack but it does make them respond abnormally.

"They become very excited and agitated, it is highly more likely that this attack happened because this dog had taken cocaine.

"In my experience with Staffordshire Bull Terriers if they think they are in a dominant position its response must have been to attack."

 

Better not doze off on the settee then if you have one of those beasts.

The dog isn't pictured; I guessed.

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There aren't many things in this world that would make me cack my trolleys but a staffie on crack is certainly one of them.

I was working on a job in some shithole in Blackpool at the start of the year where the garden was divided by a wooden panelled fence. The neighbours dog, a staffie, took umbrage at my presence and proceeded to go fucking berserk. 

After about 20 minutes it completely lost it's shit and proceeded to eat (yes, eat) it's way through the wooden fence. The sight of a staffies jaws tearing an ever-widening hole in an otherwise pretty solid fence is a sight I won't forget in a hurry. It looked like someone dropping some ice-cream sticks into a magimix. I blew out my sphincter and booted the customers door in to get away.

Another customer works in A&E in the same town and she said dog bites - bad ones, are one of the most common thing they see.

Can't say I was too surprised.

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There's Staffie staffies.

And the Pittbull's pretending to be staffies.

 

12 minutes ago, Sgt Hartman said:

There aren't many things in this world that would make me cack my trolleys but a staffie on crack is certainly one of them.

I was working on a job in some shithole in Blackpool at the start of the year where the garden was divided by a wooden panelled fence. The neighbours dog, a staffie, took umbrage at my presence and proceeded to go fucking berserk. 

After about 20 minutes it completely lost it's shit and proceeded to eat (yes, eat) it's way through the wooden fence. The sight of a staffies jaws tearing an ever-widening hole in an otherwise pretty solid fence is a sight I won't forget in a hurry. It looked like someone dropping some ice-cream sticks into a magimix. I blew out my sphincter and booted the customers door in to get away.

Another customer works in A&E in the same town and she said dog bites - bad ones, are one of the most common thing they see.

Can't say I was too surprised.

All dog owners must be required to purchase 3rd party insurance.

All dogs microchiped. Instant fine of 1k for any owner.

Let the insurance company charge by breed type.

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13 minutes ago, spygirl said:

There's Staffie staffies.

And the Pittbull's pretending to be staffies.

 

May well have been a pitbull, I didn't get too close a look. All I remember was a triangular head, low to the ground and a set of teeth like a beartrap crossed with a chainsaw.

Also a cold, cold eye that never dropped its gaze from my balls for a second. Even while it was turning the fence into sawdust.

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Pretty much with all dogs, the clue is in the name.

Bull terriers (all of them) = cross between a bulldog (=bred to bite, hold on, not let go, take a beating) with a terrier (digging dog, bred to hunt down (smaller) prey and decimate them).  They were also bred as fighting dogs (ie, take on other dogs) because the government said that getting dogs to  fight bulls was a bit nasty for the bull.

Now, you might well have a dog that is nicely behaved, but, ultimately, if their breeding takes over then you're going to get behaviour that could take down a bull, and could take the punishment metered out by another fighting dog.

IMO you'd be better off with a nicer breed.  Eg, collies were bred to round up sheep, so the 'breeding takes over' behaviour might be to start rounding up whatever is around (children, geese, cars), and while they might nip they weren't bred to bite hard (as it marks the meat).  

Or most hunting dogs (poodles, spaniels, etc)-- while these might have a bit of terrier, they'll also have the 'hanging around waiting' 'go and fetch' and 'bark loudly' breeding.

ed -- actually, I suppose these fighting dogs also had 'hang around for long lengths of time doing nothing' bred into them, so maybe they'd be convenient for people who don't like to do stuff with their dogs.  

Edited by dgul

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1 hour ago, Sgt Hartman said:

May well have been a pitbull, I didn't get too close a look. All I remember was a triangular head, low to the ground and a set of teeth like a beartrap crossed with a chainsaw.

Also a cold, cold eye that never dropped its gaze from my balls for a second. Even while it was turning the fence into sawdust.

They are all Staffies until they eat somebody and the Police have a loser look.

Staffy breeds are meant to be short, stocky animals.

Ive seen a dosser with a 'Staffy' thats the same height as a short Lab.

 

1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

I think Staffies are providing:

1) Its been socialised.

2) You are not another dog, or holding another dog.

3) Its not a pitball.

We were talking about this topic. In the 80s every scummer had an Alsatian. Now theyve got these huge fucking bully dogs. Alsatians look almost like lapdogs now.

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Spy has it right.

Staffies generally ok unless really bad owners. But they are short. Very strong still, but short. You still don't want to get bitten by one, unless you have a sharp knife in the other hand and you gut it, it will never let go.

When they are mysteriously double the height and half as heavy again or more, it's a pitbull. As I've mentioned before, I have also known a cross between one of those and a greyhound, physically an astonishing animal - fortunately it liked people.

Problem is there is no test to distinguish between these "breeds". I'd be pleased have them all put down and live without them all, I mean, why does anyone need a dog of that type? The things they were bred for are now illegal. Bit of a shame about the good staffies but better than the current mess.

 

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23 minutes ago, swissy_fit said:

Spy has it right.

Staffies generally ok unless really bad owners. But they are short. Very strong still, but short. You still don't want to get bitten by one, unless you have a sharp knife in the other hand and you gut it, it will never let go.

When they are mysteriously double the height and half as heavy again or more, it's a pitbull. As I've mentioned before, I have also known a cross between one of those and a greyhound, physically an astonishing animal - fortunately it liked people.

Problem is there is no test to distinguish between these "breeds". I'd be pleased have them all put down and live without them all, I mean, why does anyone need a dog of that type? The things they were bred for are now illegal. Bit of a shame about the good staffies but better than the current mess.

 

Yes.  Cut through the specific breed nonsense as the government finally did for legal highs.

Any fighting type dog is illegal and will be seized and put down and the owner prosecuted.

 

End of.

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"It is very likely that this dog had consumed drugs, probably eaten them"

With this statement, I note they didn't rule out the possibility that the dog smoked  rocks through a glass pipe or snowballed it intravenously with some smack

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Although very much a fan of dogs, I'm concerned that too many are being bred, and being bred unselectively without concern for health and temperament. Also, too many people are getting dogs without being honest with themselves about taking on the responsibility of training and exercise. There is a lot of unconscious bias toward the council estate bull terrier and their owner, but a broadly similar set of problems could apply equally to the labrador in a middle class area. Both are bringing a predatory carnivore into their home, a decision not to be taken lightly. Contrary to the popular myth, sticking your finger up an attacking dog's bottom will not make it release:

 

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