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Taking plaster off around the inside of electrical socket


One percent
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One percent

I’ve just had some plastering done.  Sockets loosened. Plaster is sitting into the back box so looks a mess and the sockets won’t go back. My electrician takes the plaster off to sit neatly against the metal back box. Don’t want to call him out for this as it’s a two minute job and I would have to wait ages. Need to crack on with decorating.  
 

what tool/technique do i use please. 

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Andersen

Any photos ? I'm not sure what the problem is that you're trying to fix.

Big lumps that are behind the loosened socket faceplate? Use a chisel or screwdriver at 45 degrees so it points "into" the box in the wall, put the tip of the screwdriver on the big lump you want to remove, gently hit the end of the screwdriver to break the lump off. Remove any fallen bits from the bottom of the box when you're done. When the front faceplate goes back it will hide some plaster - make sure you only remove from areas that will be hidden. Makes sense?

Crap plastering that isn't flat so the socket faceplate won't go back on the wall? Use a wallpaper scraper or similar to gently scrape the high bits off the lumpy plaster.

It's safest to turn the electrics off first but is ok to do when it's still on, just be very carful no to touch any metal bits behind the socket !

Wilcos sell "superfine" filler, ideal to fill any small holes that are visible when the sockets are back in place.

Kudos for going DIY, and find a better plasterer next time :S

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Chewing Grass
49 minutes ago, One percent said:

This is what i mean

 

B795751B-6924-43FB-B5C8-E68DA2F1B61A.jpeg

Man up woman, fingers and kitchen / stanleys knife if you want a neater edge.

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Old chisel and hammer - scratch line where the pattress lip is - may have to estimate that a bit, then gently go round the outline tapping off the excess. If no chisel anything with a 1 inch ish edge to use with tap with the hammer.

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Andersen

chisel or flat bladed screwdriver, hold at an angle so the tip points at the cross-pointed screw at the middle of the box at the back (so you don't damage the "good" plaster you want to keep), hit gently with a small hammer r your hand.

Not a padsaw, too slow and will clog up v quick.

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nirvana
44 minutes ago, One percent said:

what tool/technique do i use please.

prise it out with a screwdriver? gently does it, don't want you chipping a fingernail :Poh yeah don't touch any metals parts with it lol

learn how to isolate your sockets at your fuse box

Edited by nirvana
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One percent
1 hour ago, Andersen said:

Any photos ? I'm not sure what the problem is that you're trying to fix.

Big lumps that are behind the loosened socket faceplate? Use a chisel or screwdriver at 45 degrees so it points "into" the box in the wall, put the tip of the screwdriver on the big lump you want to remove, gently hit the end of the screwdriver to break the lump off. Remove any fallen bits from the bottom of the box when you're done. When the front faceplate goes back it will hide some plaster - make sure you only remove from areas that will be hidden. Makes sense?

Crap plastering that isn't flat so the socket faceplate won't go back on the wall? Use a wallpaper scraper or similar to gently scrape the high bits off the lumpy plaster.

It's safest to turn the electrics off first but is ok to do when it's still on, just be very carful no to touch any metal bits behind the socket !

Wilcos sell "superfine" filler, ideal to fill any small holes that are visible when the sockets are back in place.

Kudos for going DIY, and find a better plasterer next time :S

This is what i mean

 

B795751B-6924-43FB-B5C8-E68DA2F1B61A.jpeg

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Pad saw I think is the tool designed for this type of job, very cheap from Toolstation et al.  I had to cut a hole in my ceiling and used one.

That said, I'd be tempted to get stuck in with whatever I had to hand.

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SpectrumFX

I don't know the proper way to do it, but If you're tempted to knock it off, then I'd suggest that you score lines into the plaster with a knife where you want it to break first.

I once accidentally took half the plaster off a bedroom wall when I was trying to remove the skirting board, and the guy who came to replaster for me suggested that things would have gone much better for me had I scored the wall above the skirting first.

xD

 

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Libspero
On 14/07/2021 at 20:53, SpectrumFX said:

I once accidentally took half the plaster off a bedroom wall when I was trying to remove the skirting board, and the guy who came to replaster for me suggested that things would have gone much better for me had I scored the wall above the skirting first

Next time get yourself a bag of this..  a trowel and a sanding block.  Great for patch repair and if you don’t get a perfect finish it just sands easily back as to be invisible:

2018-Wickes-Missing-Product-650x650

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Dremel for least likelihood of a bollocksed up mess.

In the absence of that score heavily then press wide chisel firmly in score and nibble away directly above/below with pliers.

Avoid hammers unless you’re doing it all the time for a living.

In the hands of amateurs nine out of ten of all hammer blows are immediately followed by the word fuck.

Edited by SNACR
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Battenberg
On 16/07/2021 at 06:18, Libspero said:

Next time get yourself a bag of this..  a trowel and a sanding block.  Great for patch repair and if you don’t get a perfect finish it just sands easily back as to be invisible:

2018-Wickes-Missing-Product-650x650

Can you tell me if this is better than ready made filler? I’ve had my hall replastered by 3 different plasterers, 2 of which were rubbish. My 3rd guy, who usually does my rooms, has redone most of my walls but left one that didn’t look too bad. We’ve now started painting and it’s pretty rough in places. Someone had recommended AMes but I’ll try this if you think it might do the job.

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Bobthebuilder
55 minutes ago, Battenberg said:

Can you tell me if this is better than ready made filler? I’ve had my hall replastered by 3 different plasterers, 2 of which were rubbish. My 3rd guy, who usually does my rooms, has redone most of my walls but left one that didn’t look too bad. We’ve now started painting and it’s pretty rough in places. Someone had recommended AMes but I’ll try this if you think it might do the job.

Yep, that's the stuff, makes pre painting the nuts, and always has.

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1 hour ago, Battenberg said:

Can you tell me if this is better than ready made filler? I’ve had my hall replastered by 3 different plasterers, 2 of which were rubbish. My 3rd guy, who usually does my rooms, has redone most of my walls but left one that didn’t look too bad. We’ve now started painting and it’s pretty rough in places. Someone had recommended AMes but I’ll try this if you think it might do the job.

I’ve never got on with the cheap ready made filler..  horrible stuff that doesn’t sand well.   
 

There is a premixed equivalent of easifill called “smoothover”.  It’s basically the same stuff the price is bonkers.
 

I’d definitely recommend trying the easifill..   I use it frequently..  don’t be scared,  it sands so easily that you really can’t go very wrong.

Apply with a plasterers trowel and skim as flat as you can.  Then sand with a sanding block and fairly fine (180 ish grit) sand paper.   Start with a small patch and see how you get on.

I’ve used it on many of our walls when we took off the wallpaper to find poor quality plastering behind. It looks perfect afterwards.

Only warning..  when you sand it you’ll get white dust everywhere !

Good luck 👍

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8 hours ago, afly said:

Any difference between easifill and polyfill?

always gone with polyfill in the past. never thought to try any others

If you can get polyfill to work,  by all means use it.  For me I could never get the stuff to make an invisible repair.

The beauty of easifill for me is that it sands super easily and invisibly.  Just slap some on without worrying if it’s absolutely perfect..   then just sand completely flat and paint.

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