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spygirl

Whod have guessed!

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55 minutes ago, NTB said:

There should be a sizable callout charge in these situations.

Doesn't even need to be sizable -- even £50 or so would discourage stupidity but not hinder the genuine emergency call.

Stupid thing is, genuine people who are rescued by RNLI/mountain-rescue often (where they can) quietly donate a sizeable sum to the organisation that saved them.  It is just the idiots that bring it on themselves that don't.

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And people raise eyebrows when I allude of the multi-generational idiocracy the world has witnessed. It's a good thing AI is just around the corner, as there is precious little natural intelligence left.

 

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12 hours ago, dgul said:

Doesn't even need to be sizable -- even £50 or so would discourage stupidity but not hinder the genuine emergency call.

Stupid thing is, genuine people who are rescued by RNLI/mountain-rescue often (where they can) quietly donate a sizeable sum to the organisation that saved them.  It is just the idiots that bring it on themselves that don't.

Wouldn't make a difference though, the sort of people deciding to climb Snowden in a pair of pants, and more importantly not have the forethought to arrange support (i.e. a mate with a warm jacket) are not the sort to be put off with a £50 fine or more significantly even consider the consequence. I very much doubt he thought about the fact he would need to be rescued and was more focused on all the pictures he could post on Bookface. 

It will end up that it's applied to all and those who prepare as best they can but get taken ill/have an accident will be footing the bill. 

 

Edited by gilf
just a n't but makes all the difference

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1 minute ago, gilf said:

Would make a difference though, the sort of people deciding to climb Snowden in a pair of pants, and more importantly not have the forethought to arrange support (i.e. a mate with a warm jacket) are not the sort to be put off with a £50 fine or more significantly even consider the consequence. I very much doubt he thought about the fact he would need to be rescued and was more focused on all the pictures he could post on Bookface. 

It will end up that it's applied to all and those who prepare as best they can but get taken ill/have an accident will be footing the bill. 

 

This is the point of the story for me.

That was a top idea for a fund raising stunt but anyone with have a brain cell would have done exactly as you said and there would not have been a problem.

What a plonker.

 

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How much did he raise for charity? Which charity? A dementia one?

It was nice of him to raise the money but how much, as others have asked, did he actually cost the tax-payer?

Some people with warm clothing for him, some flasks of coffee / tea / soup, etc, and, whilst still risky, could have achieved his aim. But it gets cold as feck on those mountains, especially with the wind-chill.

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This bit of analysis always deserves an airing:

Quote

 

Some years ago, a study in Injury, the International Journal Of The Care Of The Injured, looked at two popular parachuting centres in Perthshire over five years.

The authors — orthopaedic surgeons, clearly appalled at the trail of broken-boned sky-divers they saw — analysed the parachuting injuries at Perth Royal Infirmary. They also looked at the amount of money raised for charity and worked out the cost to taxpayers of NHS treatment for these skydiving casualties.

And the results — in their article Parachuting For Charity: Is It Worth The Money?' — were astonishing. Over the course of the five years, 174 injured parachutists were treated, of which 94 per cent were first-time jumpers. In total, 103 were admitted to hospital.

As a result, the three doctors estimated that one in nine charity sky-divers would be injured. What's more, 7 per cent were 'severely injured' — with common injuries being broken ankles and shin bones.

And the cost of this treatment? On average, the NHS spent £3,751 per patient — and one jumper was so badly hurt they had to spend 43 days in hospital. The average stay for those needing an operation was nine days.

Compare this with the average amount of money for charities raised by each participant: just £30.

So, that means that every pound raised for charity cost taxpayers £13.75 in return.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3224643/Why-tell-charity-skydivers-running-JUMP-Good-causes-fraction-cash-NHS-pay-injuries.html

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This bloke climbed Snowden in his pants carrying a big piece of wood:

http://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/st-george-man-climb-mount-44630

This bloke did it in a thong:

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/football-fan-climbs-mount-snowdon-7482479

 

There is video of the latest one here - it is typical poor conditions of icy wind, drizzle and fog and you can see him feeling unwell.

What you had to say about teen scaling Snowdon in his underwear

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/what-you-say-teen-scaling-13634391

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