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wherebee

LLLLLIabour Party conference in Brighton

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So - the LLLIAbour party conference is kicking off in Brighton.  Couple of observations from me:

i) didn't the Labour conference used to take part in Northern Heartland towns?  Does using Brighton cement the break with the working class and the conjoining to the Islington/Hove bubble set?

ii) does the fact they have chosen a hideously white town reflect a concern about security in more...enriched traditional locations?

iii) With May being such a waste of skin, could Corbyn be the next PM if he does a storming set of speeches just in time for a Tory infighting collapse in the Autumn>?

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6 minutes ago, wherebee said:

So - the LLLIAbour party conference is kicking off in Brighton.  Couple of observations from me:

i) didn't the Labour conference used to take part in Northern Heartland towns?  Does using Brighton cement the break with the working class and the conjoining to the Islington/Hove bubble set?

ii) does the fact they have chosen a hideously white town reflect a concern about security in more...enriched traditional locations?

iii) With May being such a waste of skin, could Corbyn be the next PM if he does a storming set of speeches just in time for a Tory infighting collapse in the Autumn>?

Nope. Crops up around the country, like th others.

Brightons hideously green and two faced

No,. never. Or, if he dioes, Mad Max UK.

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7 minutes ago, wherebee said:

So - the LLLIAbour party conference is kicking off in Brighton.  Couple of observations from me:

i) didn't the Labour conference used to take part in Northern Heartland towns?  Does using Brighton cement the break with the working class and the conjoining to the Islington/Hove bubble set?

ii) does the fact they have chosen a hideously white town reflect a concern about security in more...enriched traditional locations?

iii) With May being such a waste of skin, could Corbyn be the next PM if he does a storming set of speeches just in time for a Tory infighting collapse in the Autumn>?

The irony is that Tories have held there recent conferences in Manchester and Birmingham. I think they went off Brighton after the IRA came close to blowing up half the Thatcher government there.

Edited by Virgil Caine

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12 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Nope.

Seprated somewhere around ~1978.

Correct. 

It was Healey's budgets in 1976, 1977 and 1978 that signalled the end of the old Labour Party

In fact they were the first real Thatcherite budgets including cuts in government spending, monetarist targets and tax cuts. They also contained one of the first privatisations when the UK government started selling off it's 68% stake in BP.

Healey made more percentage savings in one year at the Exchequer than Osborne managed in his entire period as Chancellor.

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2015/10/in-memory-of-denis-healey-saviour-of-the-british-economy/

Edited by Virgil Caine

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6 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

Correct. 

It was Healey's budgets in 1976, 1977 and 1978 that signalled the end of the old Labour Party

In fact they were the first real Thatcherite budgets including cuts in government spending and tax cuts. They also contained one of the first privatisations when the UK government started selling off it's 68% stake in BP.

Impressive knowledge. :)

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31 minutes ago, One percent said:

Impressive knowledge. :)

The 1970s are a bit of an obsession with me because so much that is written about the era online now is wrong. For example people tend to conflate the miners strikes, power cuts and three day week of the years 1972-1974 with the Winter of Discontent under the Heath government that occurred under the Callaghan government in 1978-79 when in reality they were nearly half a decade apart. 

People also tend to forget that the high inflation in the 1970s started under the Heath government and his Chancellor Tony Barber who - surprise, surprise - presided over a runaway credit boom. Some things never change.

Edited by Virgil Caine

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2 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

The 1970s are a bit of an obsession with me because so much that is written about the era online now is wrong. For example people tend to conflate the miners strikes, power cuts and three day week of the years 1972-1974 with the Winter of Discontent that occurred under the Callaghan government in 1978-79 when in reality they were nearly half a decade apart. 

People also tend to forget that the high inflation in the 1970s started under the Heath government and his Chancellor Tony Barber who - surprise, surprise - presided over a runaway credit boom. Some things never change.

I lived through it and remember the three day week and power cuts. As a kid it was great. It added a bit of excitement with the candles and cooking on a camping stove. It also meant that school was shut now and again. 

I seem to remember though that the miners strikes were later than 72/74.  

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12 minutes ago, One percent said:

I lived through it and remember the three day week and power cuts. As a kid it was great. It added a bit of excitement with the candles and cooking on a camping stove. It also meant that school was shut now and again. 

I seem to remember though that the miners strikes were later than 72/74.  

Miners strikes occurred in 1972 and 1974. The latter resulted in the three day week

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK_miners'_strike_(1972)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-Day_Week

The next miners strike was not until 1984-85 under the Thatcher government

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK_miners'_strike_(1984–85)

My school stayed open throughout the three day week heating or no heating.

BTW with regard to Party conferences Labour have not visited Blackpool since 2002. All modern events of this type now seem to take place in souless specialist conference centres presumably for 'security' reasons. 

 

 

Edited by Virgil Caine

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3 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

Miners strikes occurred in 1972 and 1974. The latter resulted in the three day week

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK_miners'_strike_(1972)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-Day_Week

The next miners strike was not until 1984-85 under the Thatcher government

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK_miners'_strike_(1984–85)

My school stayed open throughout the three day week heating or no heating.

 

 

Ah, cheers. It was the thatcher miners strikes I remember. 

I don't remember getting sent home often but sure I did a couple of times. It's an overcoat colder oop north. :)

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If you want an interview of morons then try to get a listen of Stephen Nolan's interview with some Labour MP on bbc 5Live radio just before 9 pm this evening (it might have been Abbott but I only caught the last 10 minutes or so and he seemed ashamed to give the name at the end or at least I didn't hear it).  

Covering things like the single market and period poverty (that's female periods) - it was utterly moronic and extremely shocking.  There is no future for the UK with these people.

Edited by twocents

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46 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

Miners strikes occurred in 1972 and 1974. The latter resulted in the three day week

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK_miners'_strike_(1972)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-Day_Week

The next miners strike was not until 1984-85 under the Thatcher government

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK_miners'_strike_(1984–85)

My school stayed open throughout the three day week heating or no heating.

BTW with regard to Party conferences Labour have not visited Blackpool since 2002. All modern events of this type now seem to take place in souless specialist conference centres presumably for 'security' reasons. 

 

 

I have very happy memories of the three day week and rolling power cuts when I was in my early teens. There was three of us and we had four cousins staying with us because their widowed mother was extremely ill. 

Respect to my late mother in how she turned what must have been a difficult and stressful time into fun for seven kids.

We looked forward to the power cuts with camping stove food, a coal fire, candlelight and home made entertainment like sing songs, charades and general chit chat. My moaning late father was dispatched to the pub to keep him happy!

In hindsight and with subsequent education about the world I now loathe all the political class apart from a few of them. All parties really view the plebs as cattle to be herded and enslaved for the benefit of the few.

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18 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

I have very happy memories of the three day week and rolling power cuts when I was in my early teens. There was three of us and we had four cousins staying with us because their widowed mother was extremely ill. 

Respect to my late mother in how she turned what must have been a difficult and stressful time into fun for seven kids.

We looked forward to the power cuts with camping stove food, a coal fire, candlelight and home made entertainment like sing songs, charades and general chit chat. My moaning late father was dispatched to the pub to keep him happy!

In hindsight and with subsequent education about the world I now loathe all the political class apart from a few of them. All parties really view the plebs as cattle to be herded and enslaved for the benefit of the few.

I think the surprising thing about the three day week was how remarkably resilient people were. I suppose it is because many of the adults around in the 1970s had lived through the Second World War and were used to much worse. For kids it was just a bit of a lark. The old analogue economy of that era also stood up pretty well with almost as much being produced in three days as in five. I remember lots of shops etc also stayed open even when the power was off.

I can't see our modern digital world lasting 5 minutes if the lights go out for any length of time and I suspect most people under 50 will have a nervous breakdown once they are denied social media for more than a few hours 

I don't have much time for politicians of any era but at least the ones around in the 1970s knew a bit about life outside Parliament. Healey had been a beach master art Anzio, Heath had served  in the artillery during the Normandy Campaign, Tony Barber was with the BEF at Dunkirk, James Callaghan served with the British East Indies fleet of the Royal Navy. Their modern counterparts seem to go straight from University to politics and therefore have no experience of the world outside the Westminster bubble.

Edited by Virgil Caine

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2 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

I think the surprising thing about the three day week was how remarkably resilient people were. I suppose it is because many of the adults around in the 1970s had lived through the Second World War and were used to much worse. For kids it was just a bit of a lark. The old analogue economy of that era also stood up pretty well with almost as much being produced in three days as in five. I remember lots of shops etc also stayed open even when the power was off.

I can't see our modern digital world lasting 5 minutes if the lights go out for any length of time and I suspect most people under 50 will have a nervous breakdown once they are denied social media for more than a few hours 

Agree about resilience of older people and how in pre internet days people just got on with stuff.

A couple of years ago I was browsing at a local discount shopping village out of interest. I ended up leaving because there was a power cut with no prospect of an imminent fix and all outlets closed because they couldn't cope with no power. I overheard a lot of moaning, complaining and general gnashing of teeth from consumers who were saying stuff like their day had been ruined.

I recall in the eighties working in a local bank when there were power cuts and business carried on as usual because it wasn't Internet reliant.

I suspect that internet reliance is a huge huge mistake and any significant power outages from whatever cause will cause social unrest unlike 30 a& 40 years ago when people just got on with day to day stuff because they could!

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10 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

I think Britain went downhill from the Suez Crisis as a result of American policy. We hit the miners strike and then started selling/privatising the family silver, expanding the availability of credit to bring spending forward, encouraging dual income borrowing on mortgages to fuel a property boom, turning education into a credit fuelled business. All to keep the ball rolling and produce an illusion of wealth when in reality there is really no such thing for the majority.

People will only realise what has happened when their retirement has been stolen and then it is too late.

Excellent analysis chewy. 👍

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2 hours ago, Economic Exile said:

Agree about resilience of older people and how in pre internet days people just got on with stuff.

A couple of years ago I was browsing at a local discount shopping village out of interest. I ended up leaving because there was a power cut with no prospect of an imminent fix and all outlets closed because they couldn't cope with no power. I overheard a lot of moaning, complaining and general gnashing of teeth from consumers who were saying stuff like their day had been ruined.

I recall in the eighties working in a local bank when there were power cuts and business carried on as usual because it wasn't Internet reliant.

I suspect that internet reliance is a huge huge mistake and any significant power outages from whatever cause will cause social unrest unlike 30 a& 40 years ago when people just got on with day to day stuff because they could!

I'm not sure it would even take a power cut these days. I was on a train a couple of winters ago, very cold, late evening, points frozen so train stopped, just me and three or four students (talking loudly about student crap). I listened to their conversation as it got increasingly manic. They were serously considering using the emergency hammer to break a window, because the train had stopped, in the cold, because the points had frozen. I could not believe a group of people could be that stupid.

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Can't see why IS would bomb any of the main parties. All seem to favour massive Islamic immigration and multicultural U.K. so are helping IS goals in the long term. If any were to start proposing real action against the Saudi Wahhabis and limiting immigration to skilled workers then they might become a target, but not as things stand. 

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9 hours ago, Virgil Caine said:

I think the surprising thing about the three day week was how remarkably resilient people were. I suppose it is because many of the adults around in the 1970s had lived through the Second World War and were used to much worse. For kids it was just a bit of a lark. The old analogue economy of that era also stood up pretty well with almost as much being produced in three days as in five. I remember lots of shops etc also stayed open even when the power was off.

I can't see our modern digital world lasting 5 minutes if the lights go out for any length of time and I suspect most people under 50 will have a nervous breakdown once they are denied social media for more than a few hours 

I don't have much time for politicians of any era but at least the ones around in the 1970s knew a bit about life outside Parliament. Healey had been a beach master art Anzio, Heath had served  in the artillery during the Normandy Campaign, Tony Barber was with the BEF at Dunkirk, James Callaghan served with the British East Indies fleet of the Royal Navy. Their modern counterparts seem to go straight from University to politics and therefore have no experience of the world outside the Westminster bubble.

 

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13 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Do signed up members of the Labour party actually manage to breed naturally these days or are they all artificially inseminated?

5265.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&f

I have just resigned my membership of the Labour Party. I have two offspring, both conceived through normal means. 

The Labour Party is lost. Completely and irrevocably. 

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30 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Do signed up members of the Labour party actually manage to breed naturally these days or are they all artificially inseminated?

5265.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&f

 

What a fucking mess and apology for a human

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44 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Do signed up members of the Labour party actually manage to breed naturally these days or are they all artificially inseminated?

5265.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&f

I would be unable to experience any sort of arousal when faced with that, even at gunpoint.  Is her tshirt Ironic?

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