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NHS refuseniks retraining later in life-Sparky/Plumber/any other suggestions?


sancho panza
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Here is the ideal job for a paramedic. 1 week on 4 weeks off! So working about 10 weeks per year.

Oil rig medic ... and they do sweet FA, if there is a problem they call the doctor on the beach and they decide the course of action .. which if serious would be medivac.

Or look to Norway where its 2 weeks on 4 weeks off.

image.png.8b0418c73654d6eb187b89e6215e39be.png

https://www.google.com/search?q=oil+rig+medic+jobs&rlz=1C1CHBD_en-GBGB864GB864&oq=oil+rig+medic&aqs=chrome.0.0i512j69i57j0i512l2j0i22i30l6.2326j0j9&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&ibp=htl;jobs&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwja7qCuh5b0AhXTMMAKHciUCDgQkd0GegQIFhAB#fpstate=tldetail&htivrt=jobs&htiq=oil+rig+medic+jobs&htidocid=dBl7BgMiTL2aotlfAAAAAA%3D%3D

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On 12/11/2021 at 15:32, feed said:

image.jpeg.5c29365dc017ea6e3e2431ed7a6e0acb.jpeg

I would seriously consider this, or something similar.

The trades are all well and good when you're what *used* to be regarded as "working age", but many of the tradesmen I know in the 50-something bracket are thinking in terms of jacking it in, bodies f***ed up by decades of kneeling, bending, lifting in situations where it's impossible to get the biomechanics straight. F***ed knees, bad hips, RSIs, arthritic wrists, sometimes all of the above. I'm reasonably fit for my age (nigh on 50), and I wouldn't touch it with a barge pole.

I've coded most of my working life, and it's been very good to me indeed, and brilliant work if you like solving puzzles and working with numbers. I trained as a Mechanical Engineer, but it uses all the same parts of your brain as so-called "real" engineering and if you're narurally organised and practical type that only helps.

SP I notice from your other contributions that you really excel at and seem drawn to analytical stuff. Have you ever considered exploring that as a career? Maybe something that combines that with coding, like Data Science? You'd probably have to learn Python for that, and once you can manage a linear regression in Py you can crack straight on with neural nets from there.

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18 hours ago, King Penda said:

I’ve got a friend in London that is a picture framer you would not think there’s any cash in it but there must be he has a shop etc

Big house near us got bought and done up over 12 months. Huge job must of cost a fortune. Family moves in, a van turns up with picuture framers on the side. Must be serious ££ in framing. 

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5 hours ago, jamtomorrow said:

SP I notice from your other contributions that you really excel at and seem drawn to analytical stuff. Have you ever considered exploring that as a career? Maybe something that combines that with coding, like Data Science?

Crying out for people to do cybersecurity over here.

If you cant beat em, join em ;-)

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On 14/11/2021 at 06:49, jamtomorrow said:

I would seriously consider this, or something similar.

What course would a layman like myself do to get into coding?

Or any other job akin to that where i get to sit at home and make money.

Not after big bucks, i can live off £25,000 a year.

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working woman

In my 20's for a few weeks I had a small market stall in a shopping centre. The lady on the stall next to me had a picture framing business.  She dealt with the customers on the stall whilst her husband at home made the frames. She said they had tried several different ideas but framing was the one that worked for them. She kept disappearing off to do her shopping. On her return,  I said she had missed several customers. She said she didn't worry as she knew they would come back. My stall was soft furnishings. the main opportunity I discovered with that is that a lot of people buy fabric with the intention of making up cushions or curtains and never get around to it and several people  asked if I would do it for them.  

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36 minutes ago, Hancock said:

What course would a layman like myself do to get into coding?

Or any other job akin to that where i get to sit at home and make money.

Not after big bucks, i can live off £25,000 a year.

God knows about courses, I'm mostly self-taught (thanks Sir Clive!).

But, I've worked with or alongside Computer Scientists my whole career, and never once felt under-equipped by my background in "real" engineering (apart from understanding the concept of "NP hard" - but I've never once seen a colleague make practical use of that stuff).

And if you're methodical and curious, you'll pick up the useful bits of Computer Science along the way.

So I'd suggest choose a reasonably widely used language (maybe you already have one in mind), get a dummies book (seriously), and have a go. If it's for you, you'll get the buzz and soon be finding your own way.

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working woman

How about a Care Worker for people with learning Disabilities?.

My husband does this, loves it. Works 2 days a week!!!!!! Sunday from 10am to Monday 3pm. Has the rest of the week off. Gets in 20 hours in 2 days, a sleep over Sunday night, gets £70 a night, so £280 a month for sleeping. He also works every other Saturday for his holiday money.

He takes the people he cares for on lots of lovely days out - steam railway trips, to the zoo, to pantomimes, to the pub, cafes for coffee and cake, family parties and bbq's, makes cakes with them.  He has also been on several holidays with them, Centre Parks, Paris Disneyland, northern France. When he comes in from work and I ask him what he got up to, I am usually rather envious.

It took him a while to find a job that suits. He has worked in lots of care homes and done the horrible personal care side of things but has found somewhere that he loves, brings in enough money and gives him plenty of time off. He would struggle going back to silly 4-6 hour shifts and likes to work a few long days a week. He likes working with people with learning disabilities as they are often quirky, think differently and come out with the funniest things.

 

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2 hours ago, working woman said:

How about a Care Worker for people with learning Disabilities?.

My husband does this, loves it. Works 2 days a week!!!!!! Sunday from 10am to Monday 3pm. Has the rest of the week off. Gets in 20 hours in 2 days, a sleep over Sunday night, gets £70 a night, so £280 a month for sleeping. He also works every other Saturday for his holiday money.

He takes the people he cares for on lots of lovely days out - steam railway trips, to the zoo, to pantomimes, to the pub, cafes for coffee and cake, family parties and bbq's, makes cakes with them.  He has also been on several holidays with them, Centre Parks, Paris Disneyland, northern France. When he comes in from work and I ask him what he got up to, I am usually rather envious.

It took him a while to find a job that suits. He has worked in lots of care homes and done the horrible personal care side of things but has found somewhere that he loves, brings in enough money and gives him plenty of time off. He would struggle going back to silly 4-6 hour shifts and likes to work a few long days a week. He likes working with people with learning disabilities as they are often quirky, think differently and come out with the funniest things.

 

Mother of most of my kids started working with kids with learning disabilities last week she loves it .8 hours instead of 12 at the carehome she was at and the kids sleep all night they only have to get one up early and they are all in bed for when she starts at 2200 and my daughter starts at a new nursery in a week .

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4 hours ago, working woman said:

How about a Care Worker for people with learning Disabilities?.

My husband does this, loves it. Works 2 days a week!!!!!! Sunday from 10am to Monday 3pm. Has the rest of the week off. Gets in 20 hours in 2 days, a sleep over Sunday night, gets £70 a night, so £280 a month for sleeping. He also works every other Saturday for his holiday money.

He takes the people he cares for on lots of lovely days out - steam railway trips, to the zoo, to pantomimes, to the pub, cafes for coffee and cake, family parties and bbq's, makes cakes with them.  He has also been on several holidays with them, Centre Parks, Paris Disneyland, northern France. When he comes in from work and I ask him what he got up to, I am usually rather envious.

It took him a while to find a job that suits. He has worked in lots of care homes and done the horrible personal care side of things but has found somewhere that he loves, brings in enough money and gives him plenty of time off. He would struggle going back to silly 4-6 hour shifts and likes to work a few long days a week. He likes working with people with learning disabilities as they are often quirky, think differently and come out with the funniest things.

 

Friend of ours has an autistic son, hes a real star. Comes out with the most amazing stuff, and is generous, considerate and helpful. Hes really smart too. Obviosuly he has his devil side when he doesnt get his way but nothing too onerous. 

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On 13/11/2021 at 19:25, Wight Flight said:

My first question would be what does a paramedic make?

What kind of salary are you looking to replace?

I make £20k per annum day and half per week incl unsocial allowance,but my main source of income is my mrs who earns good coin,although she does three days a week and we cover the chilcare.

I keep my job on in case my Mrs loses heres ,so what I'm really looking to do is get a skil that I can work part time while kids are young and go full time if needs be.

We have some assets in shares,so I sjut want to pay my bills/rent more than anything so I can reinvest the divis.

On 13/11/2021 at 15:36, Bobthebuilder said:

Best bit of advice I can give to anyone wanting to get into a self-employed trade is to look at the building trade as a big apple pie, builders do the whole pie. You want to do the smallest slice of pie with the best money you can earn.

This is where being able to sign something off for building control is vital, gas and electrics fill this role.

Edit to add. Set up as a sole trader and keep your turnover below the vat threshold. This way you will be 20% cheaper than the big competition and it's a lot less hassle come tax return day.

good advice that Bob

I've been looking tongiht  and there are some intensive courses that will get you NVQ level 2 plumbing(you need to sort out your own work expereince).There's also a Gas Safe course at the local college but you need to do your own work experience.That's part time potentially so would fit around my childcare.I'm going to get some feelers out and see if I can get some experience with friends of friends lcoally.

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This seems typical of the trianing businesses,no prices for the courses but a lot of promises xD.Key thing tho an NVQ level 2 would qualify you as a tradesman. I'm not sure about these places.Historically,they have a lot of form for ripping people off.

https://www.options-skills.co.uk/professional-plumbing-courses/nvq-level-2-plumbing-training-course/

 

Thsi is the Leicester College one to put you on the road to gas Safe.They have a plumbing course but it doesn't appear to get you to Level 2 NVQ

https://leicestercollege.ac.uk/course/bpec-domestic-gas-foundation-certificate-of-achievement-2022-23-c0399-plumbing-and-gas/

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On 13/11/2021 at 20:23, Hancock said:

Here is the ideal job for a paramedic. 1 week on 4 weeks off! So working about 10 weeks per year.

Oil rig medic ... and they do sweet FA, if there is a problem they call the doctor on the beach and they decide the course of action .. which if serious would be medivac.

Or look to Norway where its 2 weeks on 4 weeks off.

image.png.8b0418c73654d6eb187b89e6215e39be.png

https://www.google.com/search?q=oil+rig+medic+jobs&rlz=1C1CHBD_en-GBGB864GB864&oq=oil+rig+medic&aqs=chrome.0.0i512j69i57j0i512l2j0i22i30l6.2326j0j9&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&ibp=htl;jobs&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwja7qCuh5b0AhXTMMAKHciUCDgQkd0GegQIFhAB#fpstate=tldetail&htivrt=jobs&htiq=oil+rig+medic+jobs&htidocid=dBl7BgMiTL2aotlfAAAAAA%3D%3D

WOuld love to,but I suspect a lot of these would want vaxxes now.

On 14/11/2021 at 07:49, jamtomorrow said:

SP I notice from your other contributions that you really excel at and seem drawn to analytical stuff. Have you ever considered exploring that as a career?

I do have a career/job of sorts running the invesmetns for us as a family,not icnluding my gambling efforts which got me betfair premiumed a few eyars back.

This Plan B is for when my gambling/speculating goes up poop creek sans paddle,so I need something more reliable.

On 14/11/2021 at 11:19, Green Devil said:

@sancho panza have you considered moving to a country where vax is not going to be a requirenent to work in health. Go where youre treated best. Gotta be somewhere. 

Care p[rofessions the world over are getting mullered with this.I need a proper plan B GD.

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Bobthebuilder
9 hours ago, sancho panza said:

This seems typical of the trianing businesses,no prices for the courses but a lot of promises xD.Key thing tho an NVQ level 2 would qualify you as a tradesman. I'm not sure about these places.Historically,they have a lot of form for ripping people off.

https://www.options-skills.co.uk/professional-plumbing-courses/nvq-level-2-plumbing-training-course/

 

Thsi is the Leicester College one to put you on the road to gas Safe.They have a plumbing course but it doesn't appear to get you to Level 2 NVQ

https://leicestercollege.ac.uk/course/bpec-domestic-gas-foundation-certificate-of-achievement-2022-23-c0399-plumbing-and-gas/

I will have a look at those a bit later today, I have to go and fix a couple of boilers in a bit.

Personally, I never did any NVQ level exams, just went straight in and did the gas safe exams. Everyone else I know who is gas safe did the same. NVQ level 2 does not mean a lot in the trades.

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14 hours ago, sancho panza said:

This seems typical of the trianing businesses,no prices for the courses but a lot of promises xD.Key thing tho an NVQ level 2 would qualify you as a tradesman. I'm not sure about these places.Historically,they have a lot of form for ripping people off.

https://www.options-skills.co.uk/professional-plumbing-courses/nvq-level-2-plumbing-training-course/

 

Thsi is the Leicester College one to put you on the road to gas Safe.They have a plumbing course but it doesn't appear to get you to Level 2 NVQ

https://leicestercollege.ac.uk/course/bpec-domestic-gas-foundation-certificate-of-achievement-2022-23-c0399-plumbing-and-gas/

 

I meant to say this earlier but why are you concerned about being accredited / qualified for plumbing?

Most people would be happy to give you the work even if you had learned it all from watching YouTube videos; which you probably can if you approach it in a disciplined manner.

I'm not knocking plumbing, it's a decent career, but unlike gas safety where you need the accreditation in order to do the work you can simply learn plumbing and do it.

I'd compare it to playing the guitar.  If you can demonstrably play guitar very well then what difference does having a Grade 8 music certificate make?

Or my local garage who have been mending and servicing my car for years.  I know that the MoT isnpectors have a formal certificate but I have no idea what qualifications the mechanics do or don't have; I just know that I've always been happy with the work that they have done.

I can certainly understand the desire to do a formal structured course, I would have the same impulse, but it really isn't necessary IMO.

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6 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

I meant to say this earlier but why are you concerned about being accredited / qualified for plumbing?

Most people would be happy to give you the work even if you had learned it all from watching YouTube videos; which you probably can if you approach it in a disciplined manner.

I'm not knocking plumbing, it's a decent career, but unlike gas safety where you need the accreditation in order to do the work you can simply learn plumbing and do it.

I'd compare it to playing the guitar.  If you can demonstrably play guitar very well then what difference does having a Grade 8 music certificate make?

Or my local garage who have been mending and servicing my car for years.  I know that the MoT isnpectors have a formal certificate but I have no idea what qualifications the mechanics do or don't have; I just know that I've always been happy with the work that they have done.

I can certainly understand the desire to do a formal structured course, I would have the same impulse, but it really isn't necessary IMO.

Appreciate that Frank,I jsut read somewhere you need an NVQ level 2 to be a plumber,assumed there wasa  trade organsiation or something you need to register with.

If nto it's as you put it so beautifully about the guitar.ALthough I'd assume some sort of public liability would be needed or am I being naieve here?

The gas safe course looks a good option long term.

On anotehr tack jsut looked up upgrading my Cat C to a Cat C+E(with trailer) and adding a couple of courses and it looks pretty reasonable(well known lcoal driving school round here)

Got a mate who drives and I'll ask him and psot back.

http://courses.jcoates.co.uk/Order/Step4

 

Need to see if the dangerous laods is worth having

image.png.4d114176c80af76dc021ccd8a628a3da.png

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There's always the option of buying into a franchise or buying an existing business if you've got a few quid to put into it up front? Things like repairing car windscreens or minor bodywork repairs perhaps. Sure it's like buying a job but you'd be your own boss and if you make a success of it you've got a business that you can sell on at the end of it. 

e.g.

https://www.franchise-uk.co.uk/franchise/optic-kleer-franchise/ 

 

btw I've got no experience of any of the above but I've been mulling my options should my job go down the shitter. Could be a load of bollocks but it's good to think about these things.

Maybe owning a massage parlour might be an option. I'm off to do more googling 

 

Edit: also there appears to be the option of tapping your Sipp for a loan should you need start up dough

https://www.pensionledfunding.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 15/11/2021 at 10:11, working woman said:

How about a Care Worker for people with learning Disabilities?.

My husband does this, loves it. Works 2 days a week!!!!!! Sunday from 10am to Monday 3pm. Has the rest of the week off. Gets in 20 hours in 2 days, a sleep over Sunday night, gets £70 a night, so £280 a month for sleeping. He also works every other Saturday for his holiday money.

He takes the people he cares for on lots of lovely days out - steam railway trips, to the zoo, to pantomimes, to the pub, cafes for coffee and cake, family parties and bbq's, makes cakes with them.  He has also been on several holidays with them, Centre Parks, Paris Disneyland, northern France. When he comes in from work and I ask him what he got up to, I am usually rather envious.

It took him a while to find a job that suits. He has worked in lots of care homes and done the horrible personal care side of things but has found somewhere that he loves, brings in enough money and gives him plenty of time off. He would struggle going back to silly 4-6 hour shifts and likes to work a few long days a week. He likes working with people with learning disabilities as they are often quirky, think differently and come out with the funniest things.

 

The same people on a regular basis?

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On 12/11/2021 at 15:58, AlfredTheLittle said:

Bin man could be well worth considering, particularly if you have a driving qualification. 

Early start and home in time to pick the kids up from school. 

Good for fitness, but not too arduous if the lorry is doing the heavy bin lifting.

No training needed, can start earning immediately

Bin there :D

Housing estates getting larger. More people crammed in. Fewer crews. Many long days until after 4 or even 5.

I'd do it again if it was 1993 and a late finish was noon.

Tough work these days with massive rounds. 

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AlfredTheLittle
Just now, Noallegiance said:

Bin there :D

Housing estates getting larger. More people crammed in. Fewer crews. Many long days until after 4 or even 5.

I'd do it again if it was 1993 and a late finish was noon.

Tough work these days with massive rounds. 

Ok, I did it around 1996, it sounds like it's got crapper like just about every other job

(though I suppose you could also say work overall is getting easier due to the rise in work from home, can't get much easier than that but it's also pretty dull. Can't empty many bins wfh though)

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On 19/11/2021 at 10:57, Bobthebuilder said:

I will have a look at those a bit later today, I have to go and fix a couple of boilers in a bit.

Personally, I never did any NVQ level exams, just went straight in and did the gas safe exams. Everyone else I know who is gas safe did the same. NVQ level 2 does not mean a lot in the trades.

Bob,Been thinking about thsi comment of yours and meant to reply but having looked at the course,all it does is ready you for the exams from what I can see.So bascially,the key thing is passing the exam,how you learn the stuff is relatively irrelevant then?The Gas Safe exam is a stand alone course lasting two days from what I can see.

I've got a mate who's currently driving for a living but looking at leccy course via one of the ten week course providers.I';ll psot up what he knwos as we're doign beers thursday and he'll be all over this stuff.

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Bobthebuilder
7 minutes ago, sancho panza said:

Bob,Been thinking about thsi comment of yours and meant to reply but having looked at the course,all it does is ready you for the exams from what I can see.So bascially,the key thing is passing the exam,how you learn the stuff is relatively irrelevant then?The Gas Safe exam is a stand alone course lasting two days from what I can see.

I did not want to bang on about it, so was waiting to see if you came to that conclusion yourself.

Yes, how you train / prepare for the exam is irrelevant, you need no formal qualifications, you just sit the exam (usually 5 days for your first time, 2 days for re sits).

I noticed with the gas foundation course you linked, that you had to find your own registered person to do your work experience with. Well, if you can find that person yourself, you really don't need the collage.

Find a local gas registered sole trader that is happy to give you a few days a month out with them on site to get a feel for things, you learn a lot by watching alone. Find out what collage he does his gas safe exams with, phone them up, go visit them, they will enrol you on a 6 months training period and supply experience forms to fill in. When you are ready, you just sit the exams.

You may find this book to be a good learning manual, not cheap but considered the bible in the trade.

https://www.vipergas.co.uk/publications/domestic-technical-gas-manuals

From my experience, ex service personnel make good gas men. They can deal with the "danger to life" side of it that scares a lot of potential candidates off. Your current medic role, even better. I think the collage people, gas safe inspectors, etc will like your past experience and temperament.

I think you would do well in the field, good luck.

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JimmyTheBruce

The guy who fitted my Garolla garage door seemed to think it was a good gig.  Sounded like it operated like a sort of franchise, the parts and appointments arranged centrally but he worked for himself.

Another option is training as an EPC assessor.  If you can ignore the fact it's government-mandated meddling, I think the training is quick and easy, you can work for yourself, and I can't see the green bullshit stopping anytime soon, so it might have legs.

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