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DOSBODGERY PROJECT - Emergency outboard motor using a cordless drill.


Kurt Barlow
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Kurt Barlow

Fancy doing some winter fishing in my 14 ft tender (Skipper 14) . I have a 2.5hp outboard however want a back up. This would be a get to shore outboard as I wouldnt fish more than 150 metres from the shoreline. Only in calm weather. Was thinking about a leccy outboard but they are a couple of hundred quid. 

Here is the plan. I have a heavy duty 18V 65NM Dewalt and a couple of  of 2.0ah batteries. Can order the 5.0a/h if necessary.

I have ordered 

  • 1.4m length of 10mm stainless steel tube (drive shaft)
  • plastic propeller for a 2hp outboard 
  • M8 marine eye bolt that I can fix into a block of wood and onto the back of the tender. The drive shaft will pass through this. Will fill the tube with foam to stiffen it up a bit and maybe make it float. 

The design spec is to push an 80Kg tender with gear 100-150m in slack water. Wouldn't attempt when tide going out at speed. Would if it was coming in as thats the direction back to the club. 

Tender is this without the mast

SailboatData.com - SKIPPER 14 Sailboat

Commerical products out there for reference

Features & Benefits – The 'Water Glider'

What do the boaties reckon? 

 

Edited by Kurt Barlow
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belfastchild
10 hours ago, Kurt Barlow said:

Fancy doing some winter fishing in my 14 ft tender (Skipper 14) . I have a 2.5hp outboard however want a back up. This would be a get to shore outboard as I wouldnt fish more than 150 metres from the shoreline. Only in calm weather. Was thinking about a leccy outboard but they are a couple of hundred quid. 

Here is the plan. I have a heavy duty 18V 65NM Dewalt and a couple of  of 2.0ah batteries. Can order the 5.0a/h if necessary.

I have ordered 

  • 1.4m length of 10mm stainless steel tube (drive shaft)
  • plastic propeller for a 2hp outboard 
  • M8 marine eye bolt that I can fix into a block of wood and onto the back of the tender. The drive shaft will pass through this. Will fill the tube with foam to stiffen it up a bit and maybe make it float. 

The design spec is to push an 80Kg tender with gear 100-150m in slack water. Wouldn't attempt when tide going out at speed. Would if it was coming in as thats the direction back to the club. 

Tender is this without the mast

SailboatData.com - SKIPPER 14 Sailboat

Commerical products out there for reference

Features & Benefits – The 'Water Glider'

What do the boaties reckon? 

 

Get your affairs in order?

The batteries will have about 1/6 the output of your outboard, so maybe enough to keep you stationary with no wind in a small tide. For a short time..

It would perhaps do a fishing kayak at that sort of distance but would be very surprised if it would drive anything with that sort of displacement + person + gear with any wind resistance (without the sails up).

Try it out on a lake first  ;-) Or a swimming pool ;-)

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Kurt Barlow
1 hour ago, belfastchild said:

Get your affairs in order?

The batteries will have about 1/6 the output of your outboard, so maybe enough to keep you stationary with no wind in a small tide. For a short time..

It would perhaps do a fishing kayak at that sort of distance but would be very surprised if it would drive anything with that sort of displacement + person + gear with any wind resistance (without the sails up).

Try it out on a lake first  ;-) Or a swimming pool ;-)

I can try it out with the outboard in neutral.:)

I said get to shore outboard (100-150metres) as an emergency back up to the 2.5hp OB. . That dinghy moves along nicely with a 2.5HP at idle speed. Its got a flat very smooth hull and only weighs 80kg

The motor on the drill is 450-500w so comparable to a smaller electric outboard. The 2.0ah 18V  battery will drive that flat out for 4-5 minutes. May invest in a couple of 5.0ah batteries anyway as these are handy. 

The best fishing is on a rising tide so the plan is leave the club just before low tide. Motor down to the moorings )2km)  where there is good fishing and then come back about 2 hours before high water. So Im either in slacks or have the tide going with me. 

In addition I have a set of oars and can always go for the electric outboard (Bison 68) anyway. If I get a deeper water mooring away from the club then rowing is no longer an option so the electric will a handy back up if the petrol OB starts palying silly buggers. 

 

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belfastchild
33 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

I can try it out with the outboard in neutral.:)

I said get to shore outboard (100-150metres) as an emergency back up to the 2.5hp OB. . That dinghy moves along nicely with a 2.5HP at idle speed. Its got a flat very smooth hull and only weighs 80kg

The motor on the drill is 450-500w so comparable to a smaller electric outboard. The 2.0ah 18V  battery will drive that flat out for 4-5 minutes. May invest in a couple of 5.0ah batteries anyway as these are handy. 

The best fishing is on a rising tide so the plan is leave the club just before low tide. Motor down to the moorings )2km)  where there is good fishing and then come back about 2 hours before high water. So Im either in slacks or have the tide going with me. 

In addition I have a set of oars and can always go for the electric outboard (Bison 68) anyway. If I get a deeper water mooring away from the club then rowing is no longer an option so the electric will a handy back up if the petrol OB starts palying silly buggers. 

 

Other than fast tides Ive found that the wind resistance is more of a problem in a no power/reduced power scenario.
Ive a 4hp backup on an 18ft/6m speedboat and whilst inland its fine to potter around, in any small wind on the sea (with canopy up) its useless. Took me over 1/2 hour on it one time to get boat from marina to slips when the big engine packed in. Basically used it to get out of the marina and then put the canopy up and used the wind to blow it towards the harbour entrance (200m max). Gave up, threw a rope to shore and had a mate pull me round. The 4hp would probably be enough to keep me off rocks until help arrives but thats about it, need to get something a bit bigger.

Maybe just always fish upwind and let the sails carry you back, even if it is very slowly! Or just lay out 150m of 50lb breaking strain ;-)

Its a legal requirement over here to carry oars and I thought Id test mine, broke them first time out.

2.5hp engines are easy to work on, carry a good set of spares, (spark plug, pull cord, prop split pin, fuel filter, tool kit etc etc) Service it regularly, flush it out often and get to know the engine yourself.

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Kurt Barlow
8 minutes ago, belfastchild said:

Other than fast tides Ive found that the wind resistance is more of a problem in a no power/reduced power scenario.
Ive a 4hp backup on an 18ft/6m speedboat and whilst inland its fine to potter around, in any small wind on the sea (with canopy up) its useless. Took me over 1/2 hour on it one time to get boat from marina to slips when the big engine packed in. Basically used it to get out of the marina and then put the canopy up and used the wind to blow it towards the harbour entrance (200m max). Gave up, threw a rope to shore and had a mate pull me round. The 4hp would probably be enough to keep me off rocks until help arrives but thats about it, need to get something a bit bigger.

Maybe just always fish upwind and let the sails carry you back, even if it is very slowly! Or just lay out 150m of 50lb breaking strain ;-)

Its a legal requirement over here to carry oars and I thought Id test mine, broke them first time out.

2.5hp engines are easy to work on, carry a good set of spares, (spark plug, pull cord, prop split pin, fuel filter, tool kit etc etc) Service it regularly, flush it out often and get to know the engine yourself.

Serviced the 2.5hp yesterday. I will get the 8hp for the yacht done at the marine mechanics. The advantage of self servicing you get a real insight into how the thing works. I now carry a spare bit of wire that is a back up if the throttle cable breaks. 

This is on the River Blackwater. In the tender I stay close to shore where the currents are much less. If I was tied up on the  mid tide ebb and the engine failed to start I would stay on the mooring until slacks. For winter fishing carry a couple of emergency silver foil poncho's plus energy foods to sit it out. 

I don't use the mast - thats current in the garage. I may stick it on it and carry the jib / larger jib as a back up. I don't want the boom on it as its a faff and gets in the way. 

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belfastchild
55 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

I said get to shore outboard (100-150metres)

Of course the cheeky answer is to learn to beachcast ;-) I hit about 100m with a 30 year old millionaire and paul kerry beachcast!

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Kurt Barlow
1 minute ago, belfastchild said:

Of course the cheeky answer is to learn to beachcast ;-) I hit about 100m with a 30 year old millionaire and paul kerry beachcast!

To get into the deep channel where on the thornbacks and whiting sit its at least 150m and then you'd be standing knee / thigh  deep in Blackwater mud:ph34r:

In the dinghy I can use 2-3 boat rods and a couple of cheeky hand lines;)

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Think the tube is the weak point, when you foam it shove a fibreglass tent pole up it to stiffen it, also to keep things running smooth a couple of  10mm ID sealed bearings might be a good idea. Knowing how an 18v drill can drive a very large plaster mixer you can get a surprising amount of power out of a drill. Problem might be long running and overheating, a brushless drill might work better. 

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Kurt Barlow
9 hours ago, onlyme said:

Think the tube is the weak point, when you foam it shove a fibreglass tent pole up it to stiffen it, also to keep things running smooth a couple of  10mm ID sealed bearings might be a good idea. Knowing how an 18v drill can drive a very large plaster mixer you can get a surprising amount of power out of a drill. Problem might be long running and overheating, a brushless drill might work better. 

The drill is brushless

I have some aluminium pipe (old curtain) pole salvaged from my neighbours builders skip.  What I am thinking is to run the drive shaft through a section of that. The aluminium sleeve will sit about 2/3 the way to the propeller. Thus  will then connect to a longer length of Al pole which I will effectively use to steer the propeller but this will also reduce the amount of flex in the rive shaft. 

As I said its a dosbodgery project for pennies so quite open to it failing. However the scope is limited - is a get to shore emergency back up, not back to the club. 

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Kurt Barlow
12 hours ago, Libspero said:

How are you going to get your 90 deg bend at the bottom of the shaft?

Or are you going for this kind of setup:

boat-17.jpg

The stern is only about 30 cm of free board. The drive shaft is 1400cm long so yes similar to that. 

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2 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

The stern is only about 30 cm of free board. The drive shaft is 1400cm long so yes similar to that. 

Looks like a laugh..  I'd give it a shot  :Passusabeer:

It's only for fun / emergencies anyway

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Kurt Barlow
1 minute ago, Libspero said:

Looks like a laugh..  I'd give it a shot  :Passusabeer:

It's only for fun / emergencies anyway

The only things I have had to purchase are a length of S steel pole, a propeller and a pipe clip. £35 in total. 

The aluminium sleeve and rod to help steer it were salvaged from my neighbours skip. 

I always take a decent set of oars so thats option C. I may even put the mast back up and carry a jib. I don't want the boom as its a PITA when trying to fish. 

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Bricks & Mortar

To be honest, I think the oars should be option B.  Option C could be a 2nd set of oars.

I fail to see what advantage an 18V drill would provide over the oars.  My thinking is, you just won't get enough power out of the contraption.

However, if you pull this off, and post a video, it'll be hat's off to you, sir.

I wish you best of luck.  And could see myself making similar, if it can be demonstrated.

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Kurt Barlow
50 minutes ago, Bricks & Mortar said:

To be honest, I think the oars should be option B.  Option C could be a 2nd set of oars.

I fail to see what advantage an 18V drill would provide over the oars.  My thinking is, you just won't get enough power out of the contraption.

However, if you pull this off, and post a video, it'll be hat's off to you, sir.

I wish you best of luck.  And could see myself making similar, if it can be demonstrated.

For starters less risk of fatigue. You could alternate between the two if needing to travel a long way. The drill is powerful and comparable in output to a 40lb thrust electric outboard. The main limitation will be battery power but you can buy more batteries. If it works well I may buy a couple of 5.0ah batteries which have dual use anyway. 

Anyway I shall keep you posted. I may be able to video with an old digi camera - I am not risking fooking my phone. 

Nothing ventured nothing gained. I maybe able to do a test run on the 25th November if the weather holds out. Will take the GPS to measure speed. Will do the test at low water slacks. 

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Bricks & Mortar
1 hour ago, Kurt Barlow said:

For starters less risk of fatigue. You could alternate between the two if needing to travel a long way. The drill is powerful and comparable in output to a 40lb thrust electric outboard. The main limitation will be battery power but you can buy more batteries. If it works well I may buy a couple of 5.0ah batteries which have dual use anyway. 

Anyway I shall keep you posted. I may be able to video with an old digi camera - I am not risking fooking my phone. 

Nothing ventured nothing gained. I maybe able to do a test run on the 25th November if the weather holds out. Will take the GPS to measure speed. Will do the test at low water slacks. 

I have many dewalt 18v tools in my business, and a few dozen batteries.  Can say from experience that I don't notice much difference in buying the knockoff compatible batteries to the originals.  Roughly the same number malfunction and stop working.  None of the employees has noticed reduced capacity.  We got one set of knockoffs that doesn't connect well with the charger, but angling the charger 45 degrees so the battery weight helps the contact solves that.
These are our most recent, (not the knockoff brand that had the charger issue).

Yeah, don't risk the phone.  Could maybe video the item on shore.  Possibly set the phone up on shore to video a drive-by in the boat.  I'm more interested in the construction - would take your word for it if it works.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/194229547694

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Kurt Barlow
10 minutes ago, Bricks & Mortar said:

I have many dewalt 18v tools in my business, and a few dozen batteries.  Can say from experience that I don't notice much difference in buying the knockoff compatible batteries to the originals.  Roughly the same number malfunction and stop working.  None of the employees has noticed reduced capacity.  We got one set of knockoffs that doesn't connect well with the charger, but angling the charger 45 degrees so the battery weight helps the contact solves that.
These are our most recent, (not the knockoff brand that had the charger issue).

Yeah, don't risk the phone.  Could maybe video the item on shore.  Possibly set the phone up on shore to video a drive-by in the boat.  I'm more interested in the construction - would take your word for it if it works.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/194229547694

I will certainly post some pictures of the construction and in use. Will try and video using the camera. 

Thanks for the tip on the batteries

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Kurt Barlow
6 hours ago, Bricks & Mortar said:

I have many dewalt 18v tools in my business, and a few dozen batteries.  Can say from experience that I don't notice much difference in buying the knockoff compatible batteries to the originals.  Roughly the same number malfunction and stop working.  None of the employees has noticed reduced capacity.  We got one set of knockoffs that doesn't connect well with the charger, but angling the charger 45 degrees so the battery weight helps the contact solves that.
These are our most recent, (not the knockoff brand that had the charger issue).

Yeah, don't risk the phone.  Could maybe video the item on shore.  Possibly set the phone up on shore to video a drive-by in the boat.  I'm more interested in the construction - would take your word for it if it works.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/194229547694

Had the steel rod delivered - its pretty sturdy with very little flex. Tried it in the drill and it turns very smoothly. Hopefully get the propeller tomorrow. 

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Chewing Grass

I'm currently in the process of cobbling up a dust extractor for  my bandsaw, ingredients are a black soilpipe 3 way inlet tee, a plastic drain hopper with grille, an old X Box dual brushless fan and some 60mm spiral would plastic ducting.

It might work, it might not.

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17 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

I'm currently in the process of cobbling up a dust extractor for  my bandsaw, ingredients are a black soilpipe 3 way inlet tee, a plastic drain hopper with grille, an old X Box dual brushless fan and some 60mm spiral would plastic ducting.

It might work, it might not.

Make the collection part more of a downward chute into the collector, the bandsaw blade speed is low, not like a circle saw that will push dust everywhere, fast, As long as the fan is providing just a bit of negative air flow to collect the light dust and not trying to pull the dust along horizontal runs then I think it will work reasonably well.

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Kurt Barlow
On 16/11/2021 at 11:34, Bricks & Mortar said:

To be honest, I think the oars should be option B.  Option C could be a 2nd set of oars.

I fail to see what advantage an 18V drill would provide over the oars.  My thinking is, you just won't get enough power out of the contraption.

However, if you pull this off, and post a video, it'll be hat's off to you, sir.

I wish you best of luck.  And could see myself making similar, if it can be demonstrated.

Test model built today. 

Tested the propeller and prop shaft in the water butt - At high speed it pushed my arm back with alot of force. 

The wooden block will be g clamped onto the stern board which also has a well behind it. Through this is a marine eye bolt that the prop passes through. The aluminium pole has a marine eye bolt on the end which is used to help control depth and steer. I  may need to put a bigger eye bolt in (with bigger hole) to get more flexibility of movement. 

The propeller is epoxied onto the prop. I have also secured it with some wire security tagged and epoxied onto the prop and then taped over. 

 

1373359797_emergencypropeller.jpg

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Simple as, can see that working without any bearings fine. Might want to add a collar (a bit like a drill depth stop) just above the steering arm eye bolt - will stop the control arm riding up the driveshaft as you try to change direction, you will be pulling from quite a tight angle at times, though it would rub on the eyebolt a bit think that will be fine.

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Chewing Grass

IMG_20211118_194347_019.thumb.jpg.23d3fcbc34e5d817897dd439d6c138b7.jpg

On 17/11/2021 at 14:42, onlyme said:

Make the collection part more of a downward chute into the collector, the bandsaw blade speed is low, not like a circle saw that will push dust everywhere, fast, As long as the fan is providing just a bit of negative air flow to collect the light dust and not trying to pull the dust along horizontal runs then I think it will work reasonably well.

Got all the bits I needed to buy the rest can be got from my junk pile. 60mm spiral wound ducting came today so I will make the baffle and fit the fan tomorrow evening, the last awkward thing is making a free flow filter for the fine dust.

 

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12 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

IMG_20211118_194347_019.thumb.jpg.23d3fcbc34e5d817897dd439d6c138b7.jpg

Got all the bits I needed to buy the rest can be got from my junk pile. 60mm spiral wound ducting came today so I will make the baffle and fit the fan tomorrow evening, the last awkward thing is making a free flow filter for the fine dust.

 

I'm glad it is not just my workshop that has clutter issues!  Any way you can get a duct under the table near the blade? Feel sure that pulling down air next to blade will give best results - think some of the big machinery is ported that way. 

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