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Chewing Grass

Are these edible

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From memory from QI something like 90% of fungi is edible, rather than poisonous, but only 10% is commonly eaten because they're palatable rather than merely edible.

My next big forage adventure will be seaweed which I think is all edible but not generally palatable.

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34 minutes ago, the gardener said:

I'm sure they're edible but they might kill you. You can eat almost anything once.

Seriously though - if you have to ask then you absolutely shouldn't eat them.

The gardeners right. I had an old colleague who went on courses for this stuff. It's a real skill. He spent ages studying and warned me you needed to know what you're doing.

Don't eat them!

Edited by JackieO

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2 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

You need an expert actually with you.

Or be really sensible and put a sample in a bag with a label of how much you ate to help the coroner.

Thanks Sarah, I spit my coffee all over my keyboard on reading that  xD

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Just now, One percent said:

Thanks Sarah, I spit my coffee all over my keyboard on reading that  xD

You're very welcome.
This is my advice when people ask me about the mushrooms they find growing on their allotments.

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I had a day with a mycologist in Epping Forest years ago. He said that there's a class of little brown mushrooms that are mostly edible with the exception of a few horribly poisonous ones - trouble being, they all look pretty much the same, in some cases requiring spore prints to identify the nasties, hence all go uneaten. Bottom-line: For the table, stick to the unmistakables.

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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If I say 'yes' will I be an accessory?

@onlyme is correct I think, I don't know much about fungi but I get these in my garden and they're deadly poisonous and there's no antidote :CryBaby:

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You can buy mushroom kits that allow you to turn a log into a mushroom growing medium. Seemingly shiitake mushrooms look like no other mushroom so even amateurs like us could grow (and eat) them.

It seems a cool thing to try out :) 

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4 minutes ago, Great Guy said:

You can buy mushroom kits that allow you to turn a log into a mushroom growing medium. Seemingly shiitake mushrooms look like no other mushroom so even amateurs like us could grow (and eat) them.

It seems a cool thing to try out :) 

my mate's hubby is a tree surgeon.  He has his own yard and so grows mushrooms on the old wood he has lying about.  I got some wonderful shitake ones from them.  Really fresh and like meat in texture.  

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

my mate's hubby is a tree surgeon.  He has his own yard and so grows mushrooms on the old wood he has lying about.  I got some wonderful shitake ones from them.  Really fresh and like meat in texture.  

Nice one, I've decided to try it out for myself, however it's always good to hear that the idea works :)

Seemingly you need a log that has been freshly felled - so I'll be out with the saw this weekend....

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24 minutes ago, One percent said:

my mate's hubby is a tree surgeon.  He has his own yard and so grows mushrooms on the old wood he has lying about.  I got some wonderful shitake ones from them.  Really fresh and like meat in texture.  

 

He really has to know his, um, mushrooms... He could be happily growing edible mushrooms for years and then some spores from some poisonous ones take root and... that's the end of his wood-cutting days.

The risk is really not worth it. So many mushrooms look alike and it is damn hard to tell the difference between some of the safe ones and ones that will kill you with just a small amount ingested.

This is one of those fascinating things though - how did we develop the knowledge to know which were the safe ones and which ones are not? Did we develop it over millions of years, long before we became even great apes, and it is something -  a deep rooted sense -that came down the line that way and which, today, most of us have lost? Or did an awful lot of great apes / humanoids die so that others could watch, learn and pass on the info.

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37 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

He really has to know his, um, mushrooms... He could be happily growing edible mushrooms for years and then some spores from some poisonous ones take root and... that's the end of his wood-cutting days.

The risk is really not worth it. So many mushrooms look alike and it is damn hard to tell the difference between some of the safe ones and ones that will kill you with just a small amount ingested.

This is one of those fascinating things though - how did we develop the knowledge to know which were the safe ones and which ones are not? Did we develop it over millions of years, long before we became even great apes, and it is something -  a deep rooted sense -that came down the line that way and which, today, most of us have lost? Or did an awful lot of great apes / humanoids die so that others could watch, learn and pass on the info.

I bet the second one. People learnt the hard way and this knowledge turned into folk knowledge, passed down through generations. Sadly, we are moving ever further away from the raw, basic production of food and so this knowledge is, like a lot of other knowledge, being forgotten. God help us if we had to be self sufficient. We would all starve. 

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

I bet the second one. People learnt the hard way and this knowledge turned into folk knowledge, passed down through generations. Sadly, we are moving ever further away from the raw, basic production of food and so this knowledge is, like a lot of other knowledge, being forgotten. God help us if we had to be self sufficient. We would all starve. 

 

It is often interesting to look at people being stranded on islands, in forests, jungle, deserts, etc, and either starving to death or dying of thirst. In many cases there was enough food and water at hand but they lacked the knowledge of what it was or how to find it.

The only cases I can think of where people did not have anything nearby is the infamous crashing of a jet liner in the Andes and the football who eventually ate their dead team mates. There was also a WW2 bomber crew who crash-landed on the Northern Queensland coast, returning from a bomber raid, and who found themselves in an area where basicaly nothing lives and all the water was salt-water for a great many miles around.

I also recall watching a BBC doc about a British settlement in Oz in the 1700's or early 1800's who basically decided to build houses, a church, etc, in a place of extreme heat and which was completely desolate of food and water. Within a year the church grave-yard was full.

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1 hour ago, Great Guy said:

Nice one, I've decided to try it out for myself, however it's always good to hear that the idea works :)

Seemingly you need a log that has been freshly felled - so I'll be out with the saw this weekend....

Just be careful it hasn't got a tree preservation order or something on it. xD

also, take Sarah's advice and bag a sample along with written notes. :ph34r:  I'm still here though....

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As everyone says - leave well alone. The answer to the question "is this edible" is always no. 

I gather and eat lots of mushrooms over the season but there are very strict rules I stick to. The main one is to be able to unequivocally identify your target edible species, and the main toxic ones that could be confused for those edible ones.  I limit myself to a few edible species and am not interested in discovering more - too much risk!

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, InLikeFlynn said:

As everyone says - leave well alone. The answer to the question "is this edible" is always no. 

I gather and eat lots of mushrooms over the season but there are very strict rules I stick to. The main one is to be able to unequivocally identify your target edible species, and the main toxic ones that could be confused for those edible ones.  I limit myself to a few edible species and am not interested in discovering more - too much risk!

 

 

 

Yes, I used to go picking loads in the fields and hedgerows surrounding where I lived as a child. I would then go round knocking at doors selling them to nearby residents. More lucrative than my paper round. When I left home I think most of them were still alive.

Edit to add: I think they did definitely eat them and weren't just saying 'it's that weird boy with the manky bits of fungus, buy 50p worth to get rid of him'.

 

Edited by SNACR

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2 hours ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

I had a day with a mycologist in Epping Forest years ago. He said that there's a class of little brown mushrooms that are mostly edible with the exception of a few horribly poisonous ones - trouble being, they all look pretty much the same, in some cases requiring spore prints to identify the nasties, hence all go uneaten. Bottom-line: For the table, stick to the unmistakables.

Went on a mushroom walk with a mycologist. The guy knew his stuff but even for him it took detailed examination of each mushroom for identification. He admitted that he had even accidentally poisoned himself on more than one occasion as had other experts he knew. Interestingly he mentioned that some of the poisonous fungi taste the best.

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9 minutes ago, gibbon said:

Went on a mushroom walk with a mycologist. The guy knew his stuff but even for him it took detailed examination of each mushroom for identification. He admitted that he had even accidentally poisoned himself on more than one occasion as had other experts he knew. Interestingly he mentioned that some of the poisonous fungi taste the best.

And that is only when he has known he has poisoned himself - could have low level poisoned his system many more times without immediate effects (like stomach cramps) , how does something like kidney damage display itself - immediate feedback or partial (possibly permanent) deterioration which you might know nothing about but has already happened?

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