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Reattaching carpet


spunko

Question

Well this isn't as easy as I thought. I removed the bottom part of the carpet on one of my stairs, the riser, by unclipping it carefully from the tacks. I needed to do this so that I could feed a small wire underneath. Then I went to reattach it and it's a nightmare. I thought it would just clip back on :S

According to YouTube I need a carpet kicker, about £30 on Amazon/Screwfix. Anyone know if there's a cheaper way? I don't want it to look shit btw...

Edited by spunko
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The XYY Man
10 hours ago, spunko said:

It's these, gripper rods. It was professionally fitted.

Carpet Gripper 300x300.jpg

 

I have bought a carpet gripper, as @Andersensays , not worth it for one job, thank the lord for Amazon's generous  returns policy ;)

Well all you do it fix the bottom of the carpet first, and move up stair by stair using the hammer and chisel to knock the carpet into the gap between the pair of gripper rods that should be fitted to the top rear of one stair and the bottom front of the one above. 

The nails of the rods should be pointing inwards, so as you move along the width of the carpet tapping it in with the hammer and chisel, it will tighten the carpet as it can't move back once it's snagged by the inward-pointing nails.

It really is that easy, and no kicker is necessary. In fact, I can't see how a kicker is of any use at all on a stair carpet. They are used for tightening carpets on a flat surface where the gripper rods are fitted at the skirting board.

You are free to ignore my advice of course, but I guarantee a hammer and a bolster chisel is all you need...

 

XYY

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The XYY Man
14 minutes ago, Wight Flight said:

A skill I have immense respect for. Like plastering but much more expensive if you fuck up.

I can fit carpets. I particularly enjoy doing stair carpets, with a hammer and bolster chisel.

But it will take me 3x longer than a proper skilled bloke - because I have to triple-check every slice of the Stanley knife before I make it so I don't fuck up.

And I won't work on anything above 15 quid a square yard for that reason...

 

XYY

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4 minutes ago, One percent said:

Get a carpet fitter to come and do it for you 

For one bit of carpet that's about 30cm long? Sod that...

I'd rather leave it hanging loose than pay someone :D

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if you have a spare carpet gripper (the bit with the teeth that you need the carpet to clip onto), you can DIY a kicker by nailing the gripper rod onto a piece of timber and using that to tension the carpet.

Other options are pay a fitter to do it, buy a kicker (not worth it for 1 job), or live with it. For a poor job just to stop it flapping around, use evostick or similar to glue it down.

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The XYY Man
4 hours ago, spunko said:

Well this isn't as easy as I thought. I removed the bottom part of the carpet on one of my stairs, the riser, by unclipping it carefully from the tacks. I needed to do this so that I could feed a small wire underneath. Then I went to reattach it and it's a nightmare. I thought it would just clip back on :S

According to YouTube I need a carpet kicker, about £30 on Amazon/Screwfix. Anyone know if there's a cheaper way? I don't want it to look shit btw...

OK, I need to ask you what might appear to be stupid questions - please bear with me as I am trying to help.

When you talk about "unclipping it carefully from the tacks", do you mean actual carpet tacks knocked through the piece of carpet from the top into the bottom stair, or are you talking about a "gripper-rod" (carpet fitters call it "smooth-edge") which is a thin strip of wood fastened to the stair itself - with the sharp ends of a load of tacks/nails pointing upwards that bite into the back of the carpet...?

 

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The XYY Man

PS - it is unlikely you will need a kicker (sometimes called a knee-kicker) if your stairs have smooth-edge fitted correctly to hold a stair carpet in place.

 

 

 

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The XYY Man

If the carpet was fitted professionally with a piece of smooth-edge near the bottom of the vertical part of each stair, and another piece fitted close to the back of the horizontal part of each stair, then all you will need to tighten the carpet is a hammer and a reasonably wide bolster chisel.

 

Hammer.jpg

 

 

amtech-g2250.jpg

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The XYY Man

Me dad was a carpet fitter back in the day, and taught me the tricks of the trade...

 

 

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9 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

OK, I need to ask you what might appear to be stupid questions - please bear with me as I am trying to help.

When you talk about "unclipping it carefully from the tacks", do you mean actual carpet tacks knocked through the piece of carpet from the top into the bottom stair, or are you talking about a "gripper-rod" (carpet fitters call it "smooth-edge") which is a thin strip of wood fastened to the stair itself - with the sharp ends of a load of tacks/nails pointing upwards that bite into the back of the carpet...?

 

It's these, gripper rods. It was professionally fitted.

Carpet Gripper 300x300.jpg

 

I have bought a carpet gripper, as @Andersensays , not worth it for one job, thank the lord for Amazon's generous  returns policy ;)

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Wight Flight
On 03/02/2022 at 00:17, The XYY Man said:

Me dad was a carpet fitter back in the day, and taught me the tricks of the trade...

 

 

A skill I have immense respect for. Like plastering but much more expensive if you fuck up.

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On 03/02/2022 at 20:06, The XYY Man said:

Well all you do it fix the bottom of the carpet first, and move up stair by stair using the hammer and chisel to knock the carpet into the gap between the pair of gripper rods that should be fitted to the top rear of one stair and the bottom front of the one above. 

The nails of the rods should be pointing inwards, so as you move along the width of the carpet tapping it in with the hammer and chisel, it will tighten the carpet as it can't move back once it's snagged by the inward-pointing nails.

It really is that easy, and no kicker is necessary. In fact, I can't see how a kicker is of any use at all on a stair carpet. They are used for tightening carpets on a flat surface where the gripper rods are fitted at the skirting board.

You are free to ignore my advice of course, but I guarantee a hammer and a bolster chisel is all you need...

 

XYY

Cheers. It's actually the top (first/last) step so the bulk of the carpet is part of the landing. The fitter had already cut it so that the landing carpet only went as far as the top step - the rest of the stairs is another piece of carpet that I haven't touched.

I have done it, to an extent, but it still isn't as firm/tight as the other stairs. I will give it another go to tighten it up, particularly at the "top" (overhang) part of the step as this is where it's loosest.

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           ____________
       __|
   __|
__|

 

Dunno how this will look on mobile. The red part is the carpet I'm referring to...

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The XYY Man

Right, that makes sense now. I thought you were just talking about the stairs. The landing and also the hall do need a kicker to tighten them.

But the stairs themselves don't.

Sorry for the confusion.

 

XYY

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Frank Hovis
On 04/02/2022 at 01:02, Wight Flight said:

A skill I have immense respect for. Like plastering but much more expensive if you fuck up.

 

Yes, I had a new one fitted recently for a large odd shaped area which needed 5m carpet rather than the 4m usual standard.

I was very impressed with how he specified exactly how much I needed to buy and that he even had it projecting under my gas fire place and back to the wall where I didn't even realise that there had been carpet there before.

Plus the join is impeccable; I know where it is and I can't see it.

I was so impressed.  Local independent guy plus assistant.

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The XYY Man
4 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

Yes, I had a new one fitted recently for a large odd shaped area which needed 5m carpet rather than the 4m usual standard.

I was very impressed with how he specified exactly how much I needed to buy and that he even had it projecting under my gas fire place and back to the wall where I didn't even realise that there had been carpet there before.

Plus the join is impeccable; I know where it is and I can't see it.

I was so impressed.  Local independent guy plus assistant.

How did he join it...?

My guess is a strip of hot-melt glue tape on the back, and a special tool to heat it with - or even an industrial sized electric iron.

This is the only type of domestic carpet-fitting job I've never done myself, but have watched it being performed by a professional a few times and it is well impressive to watch.

 

XYY

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Frank Hovis
Just now, The XYY Man said:

How did he join it...?

My guess is a strip of hot-melt glue tape on the back, and a special tool to heat it with - or even an industrial sized electric iron.

This is the only type of carpet-fitting job I've never done myself, but have watched it being performed by a professional a few times and it is well impressive to watch.

 

XYY

 

I don't know; I was working (as in wfh) in my office with the door closed trying to keep out of the way. It seemed very active with lots of knocks and moving around and they finished in a couple of hours.

I came out a couple of times to check everything was ok and to make them tea.

He gave the previous guy credit (no idea who, the carpet had probably been down twenty years) for his work because it took him ages when measuring up to find the join and he had to use a process of elimination where the distance edge to edge was greater than 5m and then working back from the walls.

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The XYY Man
15 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

I don't know; I was working (as in wfh) in my office with the door closed trying to keep out of the way. It seemed very active with lots of knocks and moving around and they finished in a couple of hours.

I came out a couple of times to check everything was ok and to make them tea.

He gave the previous guy credit (no idea who, the carpet had probably been down twenty years) for his work because it took him ages when measuring up to find the join and he had to use a process of elimination where the distance edge to edge was greater than 5m and then working back from the walls.

I've only had to fit carpets in my own houses and those of friends and family and joins have either been made at the top, bottom, or halfway down a stair carpet - which is a piece of piss using gripper rods - or on a door threshold between two rooms where you can use a metal strip across the join. No room I've fitted has ever needed wider that 4m carpet.

But I used to work for a company many moons ago who had amusements arcades and pubs/nightclubs and watching them being fitted with carpets that had to cover a huge area in the same carpet was where I witnessed the hot-melt tape method. It was remarkable to watch them cut and join 50 quid plus a square yard carpets that I wouldn't dare go any where near with a Stanley knife or a pair of carpet scissors. 

 

XYY

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Frank Hovis
1 minute ago, The XYY Man said:

I've only had to fit carpets in my own houses and those of friends and family and joins have either been made at the top, bottom, or halfway down a stair carpet - which is a piece of piss using gripper rods - or on a door threshold between two rooms where you can use a metal strip across the join. No room I've fitted has ever needed wider that 4m carpet.

But I used to work for a company many moons ago who had amusements arcades and pubs/nightclubs and watching them being fitted with carpets that had to cover a huge area in the same carpet was where I witnessed the hot-melt tape method. It was remarkable to watch them cut and join 50 quid plus carpets that I wouldn't dare go any where near with a Stanley knife or a pair of carpet scissors. 

 

XYY

 

I do find it interesting how much skill is within tasks that most take for granted.

His measuring up to tell me exactly how much I needed was excellent as the room is oddly shaped.

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The XYY Man
48 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

I do find it interesting how much skill is within tasks that most take for granted.

His measuring up to tell me exactly how much I needed was excellent as the room is oddly shaped.

Agreed. Much better than my ability to do that.

The amount of carpet necessary for a room that is basically a rectangle is easy. L-shaped rooms are a bit trickier, but I can often work them out with the aid of just a pen and a piece of paper. 

But for odd-ball rooms with all sorts of twists and turns, I find it best to measure all room dimensions and then draw it out to scale on a sheet of graph paper - follow by a bit of head-scratching, and tapping away on a calculator.

This is especially true when either me or someone else wants a hall, stairs and landing done cheaply by buying a either a remnant in the sale, or buying the least length of carpet possible measured in feet* from a roll of 4m wide carpet. Working out the area of the rectangle of carpet that you then cut into separate pieces to fit it to the hall, stairs and landing as cheaply as possible can take me several hours before I come up with the optimal rectangular size to do the job with as little waste as is possible.

 

XYY

 

A lot of people think you have to buy off-the-roll carpet in round numbers of square meters, but most carpet places I've used will let you buy by the linear foot from a roll of their standard stock items - and only charge you by the precise amount of square meters your carpet works out at.

 

 

 

Edited by The XYY Man
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@The XYY Man

Do you know if it's possible to take up carpet on the stairs and re-lay it (without it looking shit). I don't mean re-lay it myself, I mean get someone in. I plan to take up the stair carpet and then sort the skirting out. Much easier than having to tape it all off etc.

Then get someone in to re-lay it - but will it look shite? Carpet is about 4-5 years old.

Also any idea what the timeframe / labour might be to re-lay it please?

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The XYY Man
4 hours ago, spunko said:

@The XYY Man

Do you know if it's possible to take up carpet on the stairs and re-lay it (without it looking shit). I don't mean re-lay it myself, I mean get someone in. I plan to take up the stair carpet and then sort the skirting out. Much easier than having to tape it all off etc.

Then get someone in to re-lay it - but will it look shite? Carpet is about 4-5 years old.

Also any idea what the timeframe / labour might be to re-lay it please?

Assuming the carpet was fitted professionally in the first place, then that should be a piss-easy fifteen-minute job for any skilled carpet fitter, and I would expect an absolute maximum of an hour's labour - unless you've got an unusually large number of stairs, or more than one flight.

Are you taking it up yourself, or getting the pro to do that too...?

 

XYY

 

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1 hour ago, The XYY Man said:

Assuming the carpet was fitted professionally in the first place, then that should be a piss-easy fifteen-minute job for any skilled carpet fitter, and I would expect an absolute maximum of an hour's labour - unless you've got an unusually large number of stairs, or more than one flight.

Are you taking it up yourself, or getting the pro to do that too...?

 

XYY

 

Yes it was professionally fitted... I was going to take it up myself. 

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The XYY Man
2 minutes ago, spunko said:

Yes it was professionally fitted... I was going to take it up myself. 

OK, well start at the bottom and work upwards, and be gentle as you pull it off the gripper-rods on each stair.

There's a knack to it that's difficult to explain on here, but is actually very easy if I was stood next to you.

A crafty carpet fitter looking to charge you more might accuse you of ruining the carpet if you simply rip it off the stairs.

I assume it's decent quality hessian backed stuff and not some cheapo foam-back crap...?

XYY

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1 minute ago, The XYY Man said:

OK, well start at the bottom and work upwards, and be gentle as you pull it off the gripper-rods on each stair.

There's a knack to it that's difficult to explain on here, but is actually very easy if I was stood next to you.

A crafty carpet fitter looking to charge you more might accuse you of ruining the carpet if you simply rip it off the stairs.

I assume it's decent quality hessian backed stuff and not some cheapo foam-back crap...?

XYY

Yes looks like hessian but might be some polyester type thing, i got it from Carpet Right it was reassuringly expensive iirc.

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