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Can I plant my leeks in July?


humdrum

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It is a daft question because I have grown leeks for years, but never really taken much notice of when I plant them out. To be honest, I was never that interested in them as a crop, I just liked to see a bit of green in winter. A bit like pumpkins. Yards of cheery vines in autumn and something for the kids at Halloween, but does anyone actually eat the bloody things?

But this year things will be different, although I may have said that last year as well. Anyway, no more Mr Nice Guy. This time the allotment gets squeezed. I will sow the leeks in March and when I lift the first early spuds in July, I will use the space for the Musselburghs.

But will it be too late?

Any advice will be much appreciated.

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belfastchild

Going to pull out some giant leeks that were planted last year.
Have a few small buckets/containers of spuds about the place that Im going to dig up tomorrow to reuse the containers. Ive left them in the ground this winter as I lost a lot stored last year.
Leek and potato soup!

Gonna cook them down tomorrow in the big pot, take some soup, leave some for saturday and freeze the rest.

 

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I always end up planting my onions and leeks 2 months later than recommended because my ground is sodden clay in March or April. The only problem you'll face, potentially, is that there won't be as much white on them as they'll be slightly stunted. Doesn't affect the taste though.

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Bobthebuilder
4 hours ago, humdrum said:

It is a daft question because I have grown leeks for years, but never really taken much notice of when I plant them out. To be honest, I was never that interested in them as a crop, I just liked to see a bit of green in winter. A bit like pumpkins. Yards of cheery vines in autumn and something for the kids at Halloween, but does anyone actually eat the bloody things?

But this year things will be different, although I may have said that last year as well. Anyway, no more Mr Nice Guy. This time the allotment gets squeezed. I will sow the leeks in March and when I lift the first early spuds in July, I will use the space for the Musselburghs.

But will it be too late?

Any advice will be much appreciated.

I used to start multiple leeks off in big pots, then plant them when I dig the first spuds up. The broken up soil is perfect, make a hole 6 inches deep with the handle of a fork etc, then drop the leek in and fill with soil. The part of the leek underground will blanch white and will be good to go all winter and into early spring, when they will go to flower and be too tough to eat.

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8 minutes ago, Bobthebuilder said:

I used to start multiple leeks off in big pots, then plant them when I dig the first spuds up. The broken up soil is perfect, make a hole 6 inches deep with the handle of a fork etc, then drop the leek in and fill with soil. The part of the leek underground will blanch white and will be good to go all winter and into early spring, when they will go to flower and be too tough to eat.

Ta Bob, that was the bit I wanted to know

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sarahbell
2 hours ago, Bobthebuilder said:

I used to start multiple leeks off in big pots, then plant them when I dig the first spuds up. The broken up soil is perfect, make a hole 6 inches deep with the handle of a fork etc, then drop the leek in and fill with soil. The part of the leek underground will blanch white and will be good to go all winter and into early spring, when they will go to flower and be too tough to eat.

Dowding does then in blocks of four. And picks out the biggest first

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2 hours ago, sarahbell said:

Dowding does then in blocks of four. And picks out the biggest first

Funnily enough I watched his video on multi sowing leeks a couple of weeks ago and plan to try it out this year.

You don't get much blanched on them but it looks very productive.

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Having read the thread title, I would respond by saying "The Spring in Moscow is early this year", before handing you a brown envelope, whilst still being photographed by somebody in a brown Lada, with a 500mm lens on a Canon A1.

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mosstrooper
7 hours ago, MrPin said:

Having read the thread title, I would respond by saying "The Spring in Moscow is early this year", before handing you a brown envelope, whilst still being photographed by somebody in a brown Lada, with a 500mm lens on a Canon A1.

Or its an innuendo for an unthinkable sex act

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