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Body weight, somebody please explain this


haroldshand

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haroldshand

Since before Christmas I have been fitness training at a medium pace increasing to something more tougher last few weeks. I have as good as been eating like a Saint, low carbs, lean meat and plenty of veg and salads and smaller portions, alcohol is totally out as I try to get back down to 12 stone and BMI of 10-12% so I can start training properly for a half Ironman later this year.

A bit of weight came off to start and ever since it has been just a little at best and I am still stick as 13 stone ish and so much has been altered in my diet and exercise including the shitty weights that I hate doing. So at the weekend I just flipped and drank alcohol, stuffed my face with utter crap and I get on the scales on Monday dreading it and I have lost 4 Lb WTF, I have heard about shocking the system once in a while but that was mental.

I really don't get weight loss sometimes, there is more to it than not eating sometimes

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my weight refuses to go below 11st 4lb ... doesn't matter how much exercise I do, it's as if my body compensates for the calories burned via exercise by reducing my BMR so daily calorie burn stays constant. There's actually some science to back this up, lazy western couch potatoes have been found to burn about the same daily calories as rural Africans when both are in a steady state, ie not transitioning from being active to inactive and vice versa.

I can diet to get my weight down, but as soon as I return to normal eating my weight goes back to 11st 4lb. I'm happy at that weight, losing a few pounds would be nice, but the effort to keep the weight off seems disproportionate, so I've stopped trying.

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SpectrumFX

How much did you have to drink? Getting proper pissed will leave you dehydrated the next day, which will cut your weight. Not in a good way though.

Also your training will hopefully be building muscle mass, which would add to your weight, but in a good way.

 

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Dehydration.

I wouldn't bother weighing yourself but go off body measurements or vascularity.

No forearm vein means you're a bit porky, bicep vein appearing means weight is about right, hip vein appearing means it's time to eat a bit more - those are my rules anyway!

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I once lost 6-8lb overnight drinking neat bourbon, lasted all of a day or 2 but was interesting that it could vary soo much!

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Aye, fluid loss is the only way (without losing a limb xD) to lose a significant amount of weight (i.e. more than shitting out a lb, as Peter Kay does xD) over a short space of time (days) unless doing some sort of endurance thing where burning many thousands of calories from stored fat and not stuffing them back in.

 

 

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swiss_democracy_for_all
15 hours ago, haroldshand said:

Since before Christmas I have been fitness training at a medium pace increasing to something more tougher last few weeks. I have as good as been eating like a Saint, low carbs, lean meat and plenty of veg and salads and smaller portions, alcohol is totally out as I try to get back down to 12 stone and BMI of 10-12% so I can start training properly for a half Ironman later this year.

A bit of weight came off to start and ever since it has been just a little at best and I am still stick as 13 stone ish and so much has been altered in my diet and exercise including the shitty weights that I hate doing. So at the weekend I just flipped and drank alcohol, stuffed my face with utter crap and I get on the scales on Monday dreading it and I have lost 4 Lb WTF, I have heard about shocking the system once in a while but that was mental.

I really don't get weight loss sometimes, there is more to it than not eating sometimes

How old are you?

Weight loss is a lot slower as you get older, and when you've been a certain weight for a long time your body "thinks" that is the correct weight and will resist the change. You'll probably need to do something more extreme to lose the stone, then do what you've been doing but more intensely for about 6 months to maintain it and "reset" what the body "thinks" is the correct weight. It's not easy. You probably won't achieve this without quite a bit of suffering, I know that every surf holiday I've prepared for over the years has become more difficult every year. 

One thing you can also do is look into the supplements that are used to accompany keto/Atkins type diets - chromium is one, I forget the others. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

How old are you?

Weight loss is a lot slower as you get older, and when you've been a certain weight for a long time your body "thinks" that is the correct weight and will resist the change. You'll probably need to do something more extreme to lose the stone, then do what you've been doing but more intensely for about 6 months to maintain it and "reset" what the body "thinks" is the correct weight. It's not easy. You probably won't achieve this without quite a bit of suffering, I know that every surf holiday I've prepared for over the years has become more difficult every year. 

One thing you can also do is look into the supplements that are used to accompany keto/Atkins type diets - chromium is one, I forget the others. 

 

 

 Also - endless cardio just makes you a smaller version of your current self. Not always a good goal for a bloke = skinny fat. 

Resistance training makes you carry more muscle which increases metabolism. 

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In 18 months, I lost over 20lbs when I went carnivore. It wasn't a linear drop. I'd lose a few pounds and plateau. Then a noticeable drop and plateau again.

If you're exercising, you might gain muscle mass faster than you're losing fat.

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Sasquatch

I can speak from direct experience. We've been working very hard on our house refurbishment since April last year. Lots of work with power tools, hefting heavy materials etc. 

My weight has dropped from just over 13 stone to 12 stone 7 pounds. I've put on quite a bit of muscle mass particularly arms and shoulders and back and therefore my overall weight 'adjustment' is a loss of at least 10 pounds of excess weight, probably more. 

Feeling as fit as I was 25 years ago.

I'm just under 6 foot and the official BMI indicator suggests I am only just within the healthy weight band. Of course, this is total bollocks. No excess weight at all. The BMI indicator suggest my healthy weight range being 9st 8lb to 12st 13lb. Utterly ridiculous. 

It's really interesting putting the human body through an intense period of activity/exercise in your mid 50's. Most of my peer group is falling apart and I've moved in the other direction.

Though as others have said, it takes a long time to reset the body.

My main aim now is to maintain this body shape and weight.

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3 hours ago, Stuey said:

3 hours of heavy lifting per week is all you need really. 

The decline comes when you take a break, either through illness or injury. Injuries take longer to heal, and during these times muscle loss is much faster as you age.

Increasingly it becomes harder to maintain, have a spell in hospital in your 60s and your not likely to ever regain the lost muscle.

It's why TRT is important for older men, I believe this will become as normal as HRT currently is for women in the future.

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8 hours ago, snaga said:

The decline comes when you take a break, either through illness or injury. Injuries take longer to heal, and during these times muscle loss is much faster as you age.

Increasingly it becomes harder to maintain, have a spell in hospital in your 60s and your not likely to ever regain the lost muscle.

It's why TRT is important for older men, I believe this will become as normal as HRT currently is for women in the future.

There are certain lifts I refuse to do as I don't think they are mechanically sensible for the body and likely to lead to injury at some point:

Overhead presses - pressing weight upwards is never something we'd have been likely to do in nature. The shoulder gets into an unnatural and weakened position.

Deadlifts - utter folly

Squats - yeah, go and have 200kg of weight coarsing through your vertebrae

One-rep max lifts - you're relying on a huge amount of tendons and ligaments not to "go wrong".

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SpectrumFX
10 hours ago, snaga said:

The decline comes when you take a break, either through illness or injury. Injuries take longer to heal, and during these times muscle loss is much faster as you age.

Increasingly it becomes harder to maintain, have a spell in hospital in your 60s and your not likely to ever regain the lost muscle.

It's why TRT is important for older men, I believe this will become as normal as HRT currently is for women in the future.

As you get older the number one goal in training has got to be not to get injured.

This is why I like body weight exercises. I'm sure it's theoretically possible to injure yourself doing press-ups etc, but in reality you'd have to be some sort of massive spaz to fuck up press-ups to the extent that you're debilitated.

 

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1 hour ago, SpectrumFX said:

As you get older the number one goal in training has got to be not to get injured.

This is why I like body weight exercises. I'm sure it's theoretically possible to injure yourself doing press-ups etc, but in reality you'd have to be some sort of massive spaz to fuck up press-ups to the extent that you're debilitated.

 

yes, I follow the same philosophy, avoid injury.

But accidents happen in life all the time, not just when exercising.

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SpectrumFX
31 minutes ago, snaga said:

yes, I follow the same philosophy, avoid injury.

But accidents happen in life all the time, not just when exercising.

I can't argue with that.

I fucked up my face the other day falling off a bike when I was pissed.

xD

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haroldshand
On 10/02/2022 at 18:06, Stuey said:

3 hours of heavy lifting per week is all you need really. 

I am back on the weights, basically everything working around big core exercise such as deadlifts, squats and bench presses

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haroldshand
On 10/02/2022 at 21:16, snaga said:

The decline comes when you take a break, either through illness or injury. Injuries take longer to heal, and during these times muscle loss is much faster as you age.

Increasingly it becomes harder to maintain, have a spell in hospital in your 60s and your not likely to ever regain the lost muscle.

It's why TRT is important for older men, I believe this will become as normal as HRT currently is for women in the future.

I have always found when you have been training, eating and living well for long periods a sudden two fingers and let rip for a while tends to do you more good than bad as your body thinks what the f*** is going on here.

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haroldshand
On 11/02/2022 at 06:11, Stuey said:

There are certain lifts I refuse to do as I don't think they are mechanically sensible for the body and likely to lead to injury at some point:

Overhead presses - pressing weight upwards is never something we'd have been likely to do in nature. The shoulder gets into an unnatural and weakened position.

Deadlifts - utter folly

Squats - yeah, go and have 200kg of weight coarsing through your vertebrae

One-rep max lifts - you're relying on a huge amount of tendons and ligaments not to "go wrong".

Bugger, you have just trashed the exercises I think highly of :)

But to be fair I have vastly increased my reps now and a 120 Kg dead lift would be my max with tons of reps

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haroldshand
On 11/02/2022 at 09:46, snaga said:

yes, I follow the same philosophy, avoid injury.

But accidents happen in life all the time, not just when exercising.

I swear by this, the benefits from weights and exercise far out weighs the risks. Not quite the same but the times I was told over the years that "running f***ed your  knees up", yes It can  happen(rarely) but on the whole it does you far more good. I actually went through a period of neglect and never ran because of this urban myth and while my joints were getting bad as well. Then someone educated me and I started running at slow pace again and with a months my bad joint problem was vastly reduced.

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Roger_Mellie
On 11/02/2022 at 06:11, Stuey said:

There are certain lifts I refuse to do as I don't think they are mechanically sensible for the body and likely to lead to injury at some point:

Overhead presses - pressing weight upwards is never something we'd have been likely to do in nature. The shoulder gets into an unnatural and weakened position.

Deadlifts - utter folly

Squats - yeah, go and have 200kg of weight coarsing through your vertebrae

One-rep max lifts - you're relying on a huge amount of tendons and ligaments not to "go wrong".

Yet there are loads of people doing them. 

Having said that, I'm 90% sure my trapped nerve was caused by a deadlift I messed up. 

Agree with the injury thing though, between the trapped nerve and broken wrist I've barely done anything for the last 4 months. Which means I'm now way behind where I was. Particularly on the upper body. 

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On 11/02/2022 at 06:11, Stuey said:

There are certain lifts I refuse to do as I don't think they are mechanically sensible for the body and likely to lead to injury at some point:

Overhead presses - pressing weight upwards is never something we'd have been likely to do in nature. The shoulder gets into an unnatural and weakened position.

Deadlifts - utter folly

Squats - yeah, go and have 200kg of weight coarsing through your vertebrae

One-rep max lifts - you're relying on a huge amount of tendons and ligaments not to "go wrong".

^^^This (apart from shoulder targeted overhead lifts, I haven't found a way to engage the lot without doing some form of them).

I haven't done a squat. deadlift or enganged in one-rep max nonsense for 20 years. You can calculate your one-rep max anyway (roughly) based on your 10 rep max so it really is a pointless exercise (see what I did there?).

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