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Should I chit my potatoes or not?


humdrum

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Chitting gets the spuds off to an early start, but there is always a late frost which pushes their growth back. On the other hand, everyone I know chits their potatoes and that is clearly the way God meant things to be. And I want the first earlies out of the way so that I can put in some leeks for the autumn and winter and to cheer the ground up a bit. That said, I have already gotten some potatoes growing through in the compost heap so maybe chitting is a load of eyewash anyway.

Some folk think that I spend all my time at the allotment drinking coffee and feeding  the foxes and rats and birds, but I think a lot as well

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2 hours ago, humdrum said:

Chitting gets the spuds off to an early start, but there is always a late frost which pushes their growth back. On the other hand, everyone I know chits their potatoes and that is clearly the way God meant things to be. And I want the first earlies out of the way so that I can put in some leeks for the autumn and winter and to cheer the ground up a bit. That said, I have already gotten some potatoes growing through in the compost heap so maybe chitting is a load of eyewash anyway.

Some folk think that I spend all my time at the allotment drinking coffee and feeding  the foxes and rats and birds, but I think a lot as well

Fuck that shit, nigga.  Life's too short.

Just bung the seed potatoes in the ground in the last week of March and let nature give a rat's ass.

You'll always get a return and it's all for next-to-nothing financially.

Oh, and it's so much less stress.

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One percent
2 hours ago, humdrum said:

Chitting gets the spuds off to an early start, but there is always a late frost which pushes their growth back. On the other hand, everyone I know chits their potatoes and that is clearly the way God meant things to be. And I want the first earlies out of the way so that I can put in some leeks for the autumn and winter and to cheer the ground up a bit. That said, I have already gotten some potatoes growing through in the compost heap so maybe chitting is a load of eyewash anyway.

Some folk think that I spend all my time at the allotment drinking coffee and feeding  the foxes and rats and birds, but I think a lot as well

 Have mine in an used bedroom, chitting away. Been there since last week.  

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sarahbell

Keep them in the light. Else they'll chit in the dark and produce big long chits that are really vulnerable to snapping.

They've got to be cool and dark to stop them sprouting. Unless you have a huge empty fridge it's not worth the bother to try to keep them from chitting.

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3 hours ago, Upsettah said:

Fuck that shit, nigga.  Life's too short.

Just bung the seed potatoes in the ground in the last week of March and let nature give a rat's ass.

You'll always get a return and it's all for next-to-nothing financially.

Oh, and it's so much less stress.

Well of course, that is a point of view

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2 hours ago, sarahbell said:

Keep them in the light. Else they'll chit in the dark and produce big long chits that are really vulnerable to snapping.

They've got to be cool and dark to stop them sprouting. Unless you have a huge empty fridge it's not worth the bother to try to keep them from chitting.

You have a good point.

I will leave them in a cardboard box and let nature take its course

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ninjaborrower

I have tried so many ways, chitting, leaving just one or two horns on, trenching, containers, 

 The one thing i have learnt about potatoes is , if you stick them in the ground you will get something

 The best no hassel way is to push them about 8 inches in the ground (just break off any horns other then about two if they have started sprouting)

 Dont even bother mounding them up, i have found you only get one or two green ones when harvesting them, and if you have the room just plant loads, who cares if you throw a handful away

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sarahbell
2 hours ago, ninjaborrower said:

I have tried so many ways, chitting, leaving just one or two horns on, trenching, containers, 

 The one thing i have learnt about potatoes is , if you stick them in the ground you will get something

 The best no hassel way is to push them about 8 inches in the ground (just break off any horns other then about two if they have started sprouting)

 Dont even bother mounding them up, i have found you only get one or two green ones when harvesting them, and if you have the room just plant loads, who cares if you throw a handful away

Once you've had plenty of rain you can mulch them up with straw out if the chicken coop floor and leave them to it. 

They need rain when they're starting to flower.

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I was still wondering where to put our seed potatoes to wait until time.  Next time I looked Mr. J. had scampered off down to the greenhouse and put them out to chit.

We really should communicate now and again.

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21 hours ago, ninjaborrower said:

I have tried so many ways, chitting, leaving just one or two horns on, trenching, containers, 

 The one thing i have learnt about potatoes is , if you stick them in the ground you will get something

 The best no hassel way is to push them about 8 inches in the ground (just break off any horns other then about two if they have started sprouting)

 Dont even bother mounding them up, i have found you only get one or two green ones when harvesting them, and if you have the room just plant loads, who cares if you throw a handful away

Exactly THIS!  Just bung 'em in the dirt, water now and then and you can't go wrong!

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2 hours ago, Upsettah said:

Exactly THIS!  Just bung 'em in the dirt, water now and then and you can't go wrong!

I don't know why I grow them as I can get a bag at the farm shop cheaper than I can grow them. I tell myself that it's to show the grandkids where their food comes from.

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One percent
1 minute ago, Bilbo said:

I don't know why I grow them as I can get a bag at the farm shop cheaper than I can grow them. I tell myself that it's to show the grandkids where their food comes from.

Do the homegrown ones taste better?  

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49 minutes ago, One percent said:

Do the homegrown ones taste better?  

Yes.

Freshly harvested, washed and lightly boiled new potatoes with butter are sublime.

One of life’s treats, in my opinion.

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Bobthebuilder
2 hours ago, Van Lady said:

Yes.

Freshly harvested, washed and lightly boiled new potatoes with butter are sublime.

One of life’s treats, in my opinion.

Best home grown veg, that you can get straight out the soil. Washed, boiled and served with butter and pepper is quite delicious.

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ninjaborrower
On 16/02/2022 at 23:46, sarahbell said:

Once you've had plenty of rain you can mulch them up with straw out if the chicken coop floor and leave them to it. 

They need rain when they're starting to flower.

Believe me i have tried so many ways sarah, i have trenched them laying them in a bed of cut grass (that does produce clean potatoes when harvesting)

 Grown them in containers , watering three times a week etc and no dig raised beds (which have been the best on results)

 The truth is, if you have the area , just lightly manure the area and sink them in the ground, water them in and let nature do its work, only helping out if it gets really dry, and the worse that can happen is you get abit of scab if to dry

 Every seed potatoe should give around one kilo of spuds, a bit more if your lucky, so every hundred seed potatoes will give you 100 kilos, its how i work out how many to grow

 The one thing i would be against unless its a space issue it container growing, its to time consuming and users to much compost, i find you only get about 20 percent more at best, i would rather plant 20 percent more seed potatoes in rough ground for less effort

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On 17/02/2022 at 21:58, One percent said:

Do the homegrown ones taste better?  

Yep! Especially when cut into really slim MacDonalds style chips and put through a deep fat fryer. Brings back childhood memories!

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On 17/02/2022 at 22:58, One percent said:

Do the homegrown ones taste better?  

spuds don't taste of anything really do they? o.O

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Bobthebuilder
2 hours ago, nirvana said:

spuds don't taste of anything really do they? o.O

It has something to do with natural sugars, when really fresh, that turn into starch very quickly after harvesting. Not sure of the exact science, but they say the same for many other fresh veg, such as sweetcorn.

I have never tasted anything better than freshly dug potatoes.

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One percent
3 hours ago, Bobthebuilder said:

It has something to do with natural sugars, when really fresh, that turn into starch very quickly after harvesting. Not sure of the exact science, but they say the same for many other fresh veg, such as sweetcorn.

I have never tasted anything better than freshly dug potatoes.

Freshly picked tomatoes are very, very good 

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Bobthebuilder
10 hours ago, nirvana said:

spuds don't taste of anything really do they? o.O

Just thought about one of my favourite meals of the year, that ties in with your boating interest, Nirv.

When I lift my first earlies, around late May, I boil them, then serve them with butter and chives. To make a top meal, I have them with Asparagus which is in season and smoked Haddock from the freezer (winter caught).

Quite delicious.

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5 minutes ago, Bobthebuilder said:

Just thought about one of my favourite meals of the year, that ties in with your boating interest, Nirv.

When I lift my first earlies, around late May, I boil them, then serve them with butter and chives. To make a top meal, I have them with Asparagus which is in season and smoked Haddock from the freezer (winter caught).

Quite delicious.

i'm having an existential crisis today mate, too many drugs and my mate doing my head in xD

he says we need to go visit the horse owner and collect loads o horse shit for our potatoes......and it'll nearly be drug planting time again......and I'm trying to watch sailing movies about doing a round the world trip and thinking what's next to sort my house out and potentially get it on the market.......talk about cognitive dissonance issues or what.....'first world' problems eh??? lmao

PS and I had the munchies earlier.......I've had 2 amazing buddha bowls this weekend with some smoked fish, think it was mackerel, bloody gorgeous........I hate the thought of catching a live fish, having to kill the poor fukker and then gut and cook it.......I need a skivvy first off perhaps lol

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Bornagain
On 17/02/2022 at 21:58, One percent said:

Do the homegrown ones taste better?  

Yes, early potatoes picked, washed, cooked and eaten within the hour are perfect.

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