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Fence post sockets


humdrum

Question

humdrum

Bit of a daft question and I have a nasty feeling that I already know the answer, but here goes....

The wooden fence posts have rotted away, the fence has blown down and all is woe.

Then I thought, every cloud etc. The posts were secured by the usual bucket of cement and the result is a 10cm x 10cm socket that can be used as a slot for a concrete post (sod timber). So all I need do is dig all the rotten wood out of the socket, pop in a concrete post and there you are.

Except that digging out the rotten wood is a pain in the bum. So has anyone an idea how how such a job can be done with a smile and bugger all effort?

And advice would be greatly appreciated

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Chewing Grass
9 minutes ago, humdrum said:

Bit of a daft question and I have a nasty feeling that I already know the answer, but here goes....

The wooden fence posts have rotted away, the fence has blown down and all is woe.

Then I thought, every cloud etc. The posts were secured by the usual bucket of cement and the result is a 10cm x 10cm socket that can be used as a slot for a concrete post (sod timber). So all I need do is dig all the rotten wood out of the socket, pop in a concrete post and there you are.

Except that digging out the rotten wood is a pain in the bum. So has anyone an idea how how such a job can be done with a smile and bugger all effort?

And advice would be greatly appreciated

Agreed, however drilling the stump with a series of holes with as large a bit as you have and using a large screwdriver will make removal easy. A concrete post wont fit so replace with timber with perhaps these condom things put on.

https://www.postsaver.com/about/

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humdrum
42 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Agreed, however drilling the stump with a series of holes with as large a bit as you have and using a large screwdriver will make removal easy. A concrete post wont fit so replace with timber with perhaps these condom things put on.

https://www.postsaver.com/about/

Many thanks.

It is my belief that timber posts hate me and only rot out of spite, but I will look into it.

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oggie100
Posted (edited)

Car jack, lever, and some sort of screw into the wood from the lever.

Edited by oggie100
drunkeness
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Harley

I've got a lot of timber fence and gate posts.  Concrete seems a bad idea as does wrapping them in plastic.  The last gate post was so bad I removed it in pieces with a breaker.

@DurhamBorn did some remedial fence work.  I think he used those post savers (pointed shaft with clamp).  At least that keeps the timber mostly away from the soil.  A board and gravel could hide them.  Else yes, concrete posts.

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humdrum
58 minutes ago, oggie100 said:

Car jack, lever, and some sort of screw into the wood from the lever.

Thanks.

I had the same idea but the wood is dry enough to be a sod to remove, but it won't hold a screw

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humdrum
4 hours ago, Gloommonger said:

Soak it in oil and burn it?

It might crack the concrete socket, That said, so what? I am going to fill it with postcete anyway

Thanks

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Told my wife if I tried to use a wooden fence post again she has to get me locked up in a mental institution. 

Try these if you want an easy life.

https://www.toolstation.com/drive-in-repair-spike/p69167?utm_source=googleshopping&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=googleshoppingfeed&mkwid=_dm&pcrid=560261087208&pkw=&pmt=&gclid=Cj0KCQjwhLKUBhDiARIsAMaTLnHwNx6yE2iy0M573bMdcXTaiWNEhzu5QqRuzHLuy138CLUgQyu7LA0aArkYEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

Have increased from about £12 to as above but they do work.

 

 

 

 

 

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ashestoashes

sds hammer chisel would destroy the wood in the socket easily, pros would use a car jack or drill holes and use a chisel

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onlyme

Sounds like a good idea until you actually try it, often the rot is at the top of the concrete level and the post lower down is sodden yet still unrotten, making it exceedingly difficult to remove. Damage from the storm over the winter means I'm biting the bullet, removing the old posts, replacing them with large in ground blocks of concrete and larger 4 inch posts plated and bolted onto the block (stainless stud set in the concrete), really easy to replace if they need doing again without all the faff of removing the old.

Company called Adna components do some really solid galvanised post supports with excellent pricing, far more substantial than your average metpost. Also big advantage is that a U plate or similar (they do different styles) keeps the post out of the ground / soil, so should rot far less quickly, they do a plate with welded rebar that you set in concrete similar to the met post if you prefer that style.

https://www.adnacomponents.co.uk

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whitevanman

Hire or buy (£150) a concrete breaker and smash out the old post and concrete. Renew with concrete post or wooden post fixed to a concrete spur (keeps the look of a wooden fence) Postcrete is £5 a bag, one bag per post. Throw the old concrete rubble into the new concrete.

Theres no point in pissing about, just get it done properly. It’ takes about 1 hour per post

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Great Guy

You're wasting your time trying to get rid of the existing wood and slotting a new post in... 

On site we often make posts from H shaped steel beams. The fence panels sit inside the flange of the beam. The steel should last forever if it is galvanised. If the wood panel rots you slot a new one in. 

I wouldnt take the old concrete foundations out. Just stagger the new foundations over them.

Screenshot_20220530-230750_Samsung Internet.jpg

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nirvana
16 hours ago, Great Guy said:

You're wasting your time trying to get rid of the existing wood and slotting a new post in... 

On site we often make posts from H shaped steel beams. The fence panels sit inside the flange of the beam. The steel should last forever if it is galvanised. If the wood panel rots you slot a new one in. 

I wouldnt take the old concrete foundations out. Just stagger the new foundations over them.

Screenshot_20220530-230750_Samsung Internet.jpg

that's a helluva bloody fence, should stop a car..... just found another photo from their website.....that's the sort of fence I fancy lol

 

Railway sleepers in steel RSJs(1).jpg

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nirvana

@humdrumhow about something like this? https://www.toolstation.com/concrete-in-sleeper-base-anchor-bracket/p75498

my 'foreign garden' has a hot potch of really old concrete posts but they'll probs last forever and some skinny metal posts that are popular and are concreted in.....again probs last forever but the 'deep holes' are a bit of a pita to dig and need a lot of filling in.....I'm looking for a solution to erect a few 'screens' to provide a bit more privacy.....I tried concreting in some thinnish wooden posts but didn't dig large enough holes so they were shite.....I'm liking the idea of having wooden posts held 'off the ground' with those steel supports....like this...it looks a bit 'modern' to me too 

 

download.jpeg

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Caravan Monster

Concrete fence posts aren't square (or 4" x 4" iirc), so they won't fit into the sockets left by the wood posts. Difficult to avoid digging out the old concrete. My preference for garden fences would normally be to use 'godfathers' which solve the problem of wood posts rotting at ground level. They're visually unoffensive if it's possible to put them on the unseen side of the fence.

Concrete Repair Spur (Stub post/Godfather post) | Weavo fencing ...

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humdrum
On 17/05/2022 at 20:51, oggie100 said:

Car jack, lever, and some sort of screw into the wood from the lever.

I am actually working on that. I used 10cm screws that did not work because the wood was rotten, but now I am trying 20cm screws. A bit of bodging will be required but with luck and a following wind I will have a result by the weekend.

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humdrum
5 hours ago, Caravan Monster said:

Concrete fence posts aren't square (or 4" x 4" iirc), so they won't fit into the sockets left by the wood posts. Difficult to avoid digging out the old concrete. My preference for garden fences would normally be to use 'godfathers' which solve the problem of wood posts rotting at ground level. They're visually unoffensive if it's possible to put them on the unseen side of the fence.

Concrete Repair Spur (Stub post/Godfather post) | Weavo fencing ...

A distinct possibility.

If plan A does not work I will give that a shot.

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Dave Beans

I'd use featherboard rather than panels (these fences also seem to be stronger, and they give you more flexibility)..you can then space the posts out whereever you like - you're not limited to 6ft, and as Great Guy stated, you can stagger them over the base of the old broken posts.

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onlyme
49 minutes ago, Dave Beans said:

I'd use featherboard rather than panels (these fences also seem to be stronger, and they give you more flexibility)..you can then space the posts out whereever you like - you're not limited to 6ft, and as Great Guy stated, you can stagger them over the base of the old broken posts.

Seems like a great ideal, but have a small weatherboard fence that I thought would last 20 years, after about 10 it is on its way out None of the materials nowadays last is my assumption, a featherboard fence is going to be a swine to repair / replace sections. Hence me thinking doing the best I can to have stable and as long lasting main posts as possible and go from there, or have the ability to quickly change out a post or panel quickly and easily with the make support for both basically permanent consisting of concrete and steel.

@nirvana The company I mentioned above does those styles as well, in fact they do all sorts, stand off like that in your picky (basically for point / vertical loads,not suitable for fencing really), fully socketed posted holders like the metpost style, and U shaped / half open ones which are the ones I think I'm going to go for - thick steel, galvanised, bolted into cement plug, should last 20/30 years I reckon. Similar really to @Caravan Monster's godfathers, just in metal.

 

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Dave Beans
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, onlyme said:

Seems like a great ideal, but have a small weatherboard fence that I thought would last 20 years, after about 10 it is on its way out None of the materials nowadays last is my assumption, a featherboard fence is going to be a swine to repair / replace sections. Hence me thinking doing the best I can to have stable and as long lasting main posts as possible and go from there, or have the ability to quickly change out a post or panel quickly and easily with the make support for both basically permanent consisting of concrete and steel.

@nirvana The company I mentioned above does those styles as well, in fact they do all sorts, stand off like that in your picky (basically for point / vertical loads,not suitable for fencing really), fully socketed posted holders like the metpost style, and U shaped / half open ones which are the ones I think I'm going to go for - thick steel, galvanised, bolted into cement plug, should last 20/30 years I reckon. Similar really to @Caravan Monster's godfathers, just in metal.

 

I've found with featherboard, that it should last longer than a panel fence, as loads are spread across the whole fence.  I've seen panel fences fail, as people nail the panel to the post. A few big winds find weak points, and it will eventually lever panel out.  Featherboard gives you more flexibilty, especially if you need to edge awkward sized gardens - for instance if the span is more or less than 6ft in length, rather than trying to saw a 6ft panel in half.

Spreading the load should also reduce the occurence of posts snapping off at the base.  If you're replacing wooden posts, they could be coated with a seal, to stop it rotting.  These can also be used, if you have issues trying to replace broken posts in the future (without potentially having to break out concrete...

image.jpeg.961e0db8a8e4e7c0eef847a2d8657c29.jpeg

If you dont want to go featherboard, then go concrete posts, and use six or twelve inch concrete kickboards.  You then slide the panel in.. A further option is Colourfence, but that can be very expensive https://colourfence.co.uk/garden-fencing

image.jpeg.45820ad84ad6dff63437d9e93792e9a1.jpeg

Edited by Dave Beans
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nirvana
5 hours ago, onlyme said:

@nirvana The company I mentioned above does those styles as well, in fact they do all sorts, stand off like that in your picky (basically for point / vertical loads,not suitable for fencing really), fully socketed posted holders like the metpost style, and U shaped / half open ones which are the ones I think I'm going to go for - thick steel, galvanised, bolted into cement plug, should last 20/30 years I reckon.

it's interesting livin in a foreign cuntry, the foreigners bring the wrong mindset with em lol

eg the Brits like to use the solid panels but they can't handle the weather! ie the winds blow in from the Atlantic and knock em down.....the frogs have larger gardens and don't see the point of all the privacy the Brits seek so much....

Me I've got a bit of half way house mentality so I've finally planted some of those grasses out front that grow pretty big and I just really want a few 'strategically placed panels' to help with a bit more privacy......I planted some bamboo  and i was warned it would 'take off' but it's taking bloody years to get going! Anyways I quite like this sort of design now, so I was gonna stick a few of em at the 'sides of the house' for starters.......one side the old hedge got demolished last year when they were doing it up to sell it.....anyways this sort of thing me likey

Modernize-Your-Fence.jpg

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onlyme
4 hours ago, Dave Beans said:

I've found with featherboard, that it should last longer than a panel fence, as loads are spread across the whole fence.  I've seen panel fences fail, as people nail the panel to the post. A few big winds find weak points, and it will eventually lever panel out.  Featherboard gives you more flexibilty, especially if you need to edge awkward sized gardens - for instance if the span is more or less than 6ft in length, rather than trying to saw a 6ft panel in half.

Spreading the load should also reduce the occurence of posts snapping off at the base.  If you're replacing wooden posts, they could be coated with a seal, to stop it rotting.  These can also be used, if you have issues trying to replace broken posts in the future (without potentially having to break out concrete...

image.jpeg.961e0db8a8e4e7c0eef847a2d8657c29.jpeg

If you dont want to go featherboard, then go concrete posts, and use six or twelve inch concrete kickboards.  You then slide the panel in.. A further option is Colourfence, but that can be very expensive https://colourfence.co.uk/garden-fencing

image.jpeg.45820ad84ad6dff63437d9e93792e9a1.jpeg

The met posts nowadays, some of them at least are pretty flimsy, just painted and they rust, all the effort of getting those properly fixed in the ground I'd want that to last, hence looking at much more substantial base plates / sockets, metal much thicker and galvanised. Panels I use green decking screws, they don't rust as quickly, hold much better and it is more often than not that post  failure is the issue and when that starts moving you get the panel damage, wood rots regardless with time and that is what I'm seeing with the featherboard fence, it is rotting away at not that much different rate to a decent quality panel, at least a standard sized panel can be swapped out quickly.  

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