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No real rain for months so yesterday I watered the plants


humdrum

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humdrum

The spuds are growing in tubs so I filled up a bucket with water, added 20ml of Tomatorite and put that into each tub.

No great problem. I was sitting down most of the time, but I still had to get up and empty the bucket, with the whole business taking about three hours and me lifting about a ton of water.

This morning I woke up and my legs were on fire. Still, I thought, at least the plants have had a good soak.

And now it is pissing down with rain.

God is alright, but the old bastard does come up with some bloody silly jokes

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Andersen

I had the same last year a couple of times. Held off watering the dry garden for weeks as rain was forecast - finally admitted defeat and got the hosepipe out. It rained that night. Happened at least twice 9_9 

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spunko

One of the mistakes, at least here in the dry SE, that a lot of new folks to gardening make is that they think a downpour in summer is enough water to keep plants in pots/vegetables happy for weeks, but it rarely is. Particularly if you don't mulch. I am mulching my veg this year with a light dusting of grass clippings, it does make a huge difference in stopping evaporation from the soil.

It pissed it down here on Friday and by Saturday evening my compost raised beds were bone dry again.

I can't remember the statistic but it was, something like 95% of all rainfall in the summer is taken up by plants, it doesn't enter the watercourse.

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nirvana
5 hours ago, humdrum said:

I still had to get up and empty the bucket

i wee in the bucket now to give em extra nutrients :P....right it's watering time 

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humdrum
11 minutes ago, nirvana said:

i wee in the bucket now to give em extra nutrients :P....right it's watering time 

Well, who does not?

But that, if you will pardon the pun, is just a quick piddle in a bucket. It still has to be filled :)

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nirvana
Just now, humdrum said:

Well, who does not?

But that, if you will pardon the pun, is just a quick piddle in a bucket. It still has to be filled :)

yes I have a wheelie bin and another black one that collects rain off the garage.....

I keep meaning to look for one of those 1000 litre bad boys....

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humdrum
Posted (edited)
55 minutes ago, nirvana said:

yes I have a wheelie bin and another black one that collects rain off the garage.....

I keep meaning to look for one of those 1000 litre bad boys....

You can fill a wheelie bin with piddle? By God Nirvana, I thought that I was doing well, but......wow :)

Edited by humdrum
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Carl Fimble
16 hours ago, humdrum said:

The spuds are growing in tubs so I filled up a bucket with water, added 20ml of Tomatorite and put that into each tub.

No great problem. I was sitting down most of the time, but I still had to get up and empty the bucket, with the whole business taking about three hours and me lifting about a ton of water.

This morning I woke up and my legs were on fire. Still, I thought, at least the plants have had a good soak.

And now it is pissing down with rain.

God is alright, but the old bastard does come up with some bloody silly jokes

You need a hose. If you only have collected water (and not water from a tap) maybe ones of these would be enough to carry it from the tank to the tubs?

https://www.vidaxl.co.uk/e/wolfcraft-drill-powered-pump-3000-lh-s%3D8-mm-2200000/4006885220003.html

 

Other "drill powered pump"s are available, cheaper too, I got one for about £12 that works fine, it's a Wolfcraft one too, but plastic. 

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sarahbell

Oh we've just had hail.

And a torrential downpouring for 10 minutes.

I'm glad I checked the greenhouse gutters were flowing right.

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onlyme
3 hours ago, Carl Fimble said:

You need a hose. If you only have collected water (and not water from a tap) maybe ones of these would be enough to carry it from the tank to the tubs?

https://www.vidaxl.co.uk/e/wolfcraft-drill-powered-pump-3000-lh-s%3D8-mm-2200000/4006885220003.html

 

Other "drill powered pump"s are available, cheaper too, I got one for about £12 that works fine, it's a Wolfcraft one too, but plastic. 

You can do quite a bit by creating a head of water, if there is a decent position for a water but or two on highest ground in the garden you can let natural flow do all the work. Put one of those gutter water trap pipes high up - to the level of the top of the water but and let gravity do the work, should then be able to use a hose from the but to any point in the garden.

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belfastchild
46 minutes ago, onlyme said:

You can do quite a bit by creating a head of water, if there is a decent position for a water but or two on highest ground in the garden you can let natural flow do all the work. Put one of those gutter water trap pipes high up - to the level of the top of the water but and let gravity do the work, should then be able to use a hose from the but to any point in the garden.

Ive a blue 220l barrel with a hozelock type tap fitted to the bottom. Its mounted at the highest point in the garden on a stand made from breeze blocks and paving slabs. Ive a duplicate attached to the house and when its full use a 12v pump to pump the water up to it.
The top one has a battery powered timer on it attached to a four way hoselock type distribution point then drip hoses running off that in different directions. Its more of a trickle than a drip and its a bit crude on the distribution but adjusted with the timer. The timer is for when Im away but the tap on the side of the barrel with the 4 way would be enough to do it manually.

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spunko

I've been considering getting one of those IBC water tanks that farmers use. Would be easy enough to divert rainfall from a gutter into it. In winter it would fill up in a few weeks.

Then just siphon it out when needed in summer. The problem is that they are very unsightly, but to bury them requires a lot of cement. You can't just bury one in the ground as I thought, due to the pressure or something.

I suppose an easy solution is just to put some hedging round it and hide it.

IBC-tanks-on-wooden-pallet.jpg

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One percent
3 minutes ago, spunko said:

I've been considering getting one of those IBC water tanks that farmers use. Would be easy enough to divert rainfall from a gutter into it. In winter it would fill up in a few weeks.

Then just siphon it out when needed in summer. The problem is that they are very unsightly, but to bury them requires a lot of cement. You can't just bury one in the ground as I thought, due to the pressure or something.

I suppose an easy solution is just to put some hedging round it and hide it.

IBC-tanks-on-wooden-pallet.jpg

What a waste. Those are used in the gin process.  

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sarahbell
1 hour ago, One percent said:

What a waste. Those are used in the gin process.  

They're intermediate bulk containers and have a wide range of uses.

Someone was selling them on Facebook marketplace but they needed washing out

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humdrum
23 hours ago, spunko said:

One of the mistakes, at least here in the dry SE, that a lot of new folks to gardening make is that they think a downpour in summer is enough water to keep plants in pots/vegetables happy for weeks, but it rarely is. Particularly if you don't mulch. I am mulching my veg this year with a light dusting of grass clippings, it does make a huge difference in stopping evaporation from the soil.

It pissed it down here on Friday and by Saturday evening my compost raised beds were bone dry again.

I can't remember the statistic but it was, something like 95% of all rainfall in the summer is taken up by plants, it doesn't enter the watercourse.

A small irony in this.

I am trying to grow as much as I can in tubs full of grass. The spuds are ok and I are about to start on the leeks and squash and such. But I can't because I need more grass which I can't cut because it is pissing down with rain.

As said, not a bad bloke God and if it were not for Him and his church, where would we send the women on Sunday.

But right now, sod Him and it.

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nirvana
7 minutes ago, humdrum said:

But right now, sod Him and it.

you can some of my grass dude, I've been making a large pile of it at the bottom of the garden lol

off to research one of those water timer things.....interesting this gardening malarky :)

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belfastchild
2 hours ago, spunko said:

No need to buy a 1000 litre fancy water butt, these are available for free from farmers, or £40 on ebay.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/234506701451?chn=ps&mkevt=1&mkcid=28

You need a black one or wrap it in black plastic as algae will grow in it otherwise.

I looked at the 600l versions but took ages to find one 2nd hand on gumtree/fb etc so went for the 220l blue barrels for a tenner each and will connect up with others with pvc pipes if required.

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Andersen
Posted (edited)

I'm seeing a lot of "wanted" ads from folk wanting 1000L IBCs / 500L barrels, I think everybody's had the same idea now the dry season is here 9_9

Disclaimer: I started advertising for one a couple of months ago and I'm still looking :(

Edited by Andersen
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The Grey Man
Posted (edited)

20220529_160737.thumb.jpg.56bf2d8bd7145815f8fd2ab00baa3b08.jpg20220529_160737.thumb.jpg.56bf2d8bd7145815f8fd2ab00baa3b08.jpgAt home the soil is rather damp. 

It rarely isn't.

North Yorkshire Dales. Here the same time last year. 

The eastern side has a fair few dried brooks. They are brooks from my area.

This is a distant picture of God's Bridge.

I have been there a long time since. I never bothered to walk down this week to look as I could see it was dry as the proverbial bone.

 

Edited by The Grey Man
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Stinky Wizzleteats
22 hours ago, spunko said:

I suppose an easy solution is just to put some hedging round it and hide it.

IBC-tanks-on-wooden-pallet.jpg

Looks perfect for growing beans up! Problem solved

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Bornagain
On 31/05/2022 at 13:26, spunko said:

I've been considering getting one of those IBC water tanks that farmers use. Would be easy enough to divert rainfall from a gutter into it. In winter it would fill up in a few weeks.

Then just siphon it out when needed in summer. The problem is that they are very unsightly, but to bury them requires a lot of cement. You can't just bury one in the ground as I thought, due to the pressure or something.

I suppose an easy solution is just to put some hedging round it and hide it.

IBC-tanks-on-wooden-pallet.jpg

I have eight of these for collecting and storing rainwater from my garage roof.

I use a small electric pump to move the water down to the polytunnel.

Last night we have a fire at the bottom of the garden (90m from the house), to cut a long story short I used the pumped supply to extinguish it.

Without this supply it would definitely have been a job for the fire brigade.

 

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Great Guy

I read that solar panels in spain actually increase the agricultural productivity of grazing land... it's due to the rain landing on the panels and watering the grass below...

I reckon that rain water harvesting is fairly awesome for gardens in dry climates...

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