Jump to content
DOSBODS  
  • Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

IGNORED

Why do we replant potatoes in the Spring?


humdrum

Recommended Posts

humdrum

I know that I must be missing something , but my allotment is full of spuds that I missed in late summer and autumn, which have over wintered and are now growing like good 'uns.

So why can't I open my potato trenches, take out what I want and leave some to act as seed for next year? Apart from anything else, there is always plenty of time towards the end of the year while there are a zillion things to do Spring.

There has to be a flaw in my thinking, but I am buggered if I know what it is.

Ideas?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sarahbell

They can habour blight spores in living material - so really you should eliminate all those volunteers from the soil.

That and you can plant them in straight lines.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

belfastchild
2 hours ago, humdrum said:

I know that I must be missing something , but my allotment is full of spuds that I missed in late summer and autumn, which have over wintered and are now growing like good 'uns.

So why can't I open my potato trenches, take out what I want and leave some to act as seed for next year? Apart from anything else, there is always plenty of time towards the end of the year while there are a zillion things to do Spring.

There has to be a flaw in my thinking, but I am buggered if I know what it is.

Ideas?

Thats the Irish method. I did this last year, just left some in the ground and also missed some as well.
Any potatoes you have sprouting in autumn, stick them in the ground over winter etc.

Of course as mentioned, there is the blight issue and you know about the potato famine etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

humdrum
5 hours ago, belfastchild said:

 

Of course as mentioned, there is the blight issue and you know about the potato famine etc.

You mean the potatoes rot in the ground and we all have to go and live in Boston with the gangbangers and race riots?

Mmh, you might have a point. Still, I will give it a shot when I lift the first earlies in a month or so.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

humdrum
4 hours ago, dgul said:

Crop rotation (disease, soil health, soil nutrients).

You could be right, although there might be a way round that. As said, I will give it a go in July when I lift the first earlies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One percent

Not trying to derail the thread but when will my second earlies be ready for harvesting?  Not flowered yet. Also, the ones planted a couple of weeks later seem to have overtaken the or

 planting.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sarahbell
31 minutes ago, One percent said:

Not trying to derail the thread but when will my second earlies be ready for harvesting?  Not flowered yet. Also, the ones planted a couple of weeks later seem to have overtaken the or

 planting.  

You can have a furtle and see how big they are. 

  • Cheers 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

humdrum
2 hours ago, One percent said:

Not trying to derail the thread but when will my second earlies be ready for harvesting?  Not flowered yet. Also, the ones planted a couple of weeks later seem to have overtaken the or

 planting.  

Potatoes are funny buggers and don't always flower. I just wait until the haulms die back before Iifting them. That way I know that the maximum amount of omf has gone into the spud

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Grey Man

 I called it sub clinical blight about 15 years ago. The dying infection after an initial bout.

2007 was wet and humid with a blight spectacular. The few years after the weather wasn't so pro blight yet the site had it demingshingly for about 4 years. Maincrops were poor.

Endless talk of is it or isn't it blight was utter shite. It was blight from the left over tubers. That affair took about 5 years to gradually settle before a full crop was available. Earlies and main.

Those after years I switched to earlies and second earliers as the tubers were mostly done before the better conditions of blight arrived. Beat the blight. It worked.

Quote me the conditions and I will tell you a few years after those infected reminants  caused issues in  an environment not so pro blight afterwards.

This idea seems alive at this current plot. I posted last year somewhere, of blight in the spud fields in South Manchester. They were hit hard at the new plot and and a good bulk have not planted any this year.

It did not look a primary year (every sod infected) last year. I suspect it was from the heat and wet of 2019 summer. Alas I wasn't in the UK to see it directly.

My advice. If it looks like blight it is. Ignore others. Act as needed.

I don't copper spray now. Just cut the halums off and take them away.

The following year stick to earlies. This might extend to 3 or 4 years.

 

Edited by The Grey Man
  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...