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Wood pigeon problem


sarahbell

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sarahbell

Normally they wait until the berries are ripe. They're eating everything. Gooseberries and blackcurrants. 

Bit late to net for some. All the fruits gone. Bastards.

 

 

 

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jamanda

We've got that many it's hard not to trip over them.  Eat everything that isn't protected well.

Told Mr. J when things get tougher in autumn I will make the pie crust while he goes out with his gun.

 

Edit;  Just realised something is eating the very unripe morello cherries. 

Edited by jamanda
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Have you tried that silver reflective tape? Works really well, as long as there is wind. If there's a completely still day, it's next to useless.

I've not had a single strawberry from my garden yet. I'm not sure if something is eating them or if they're just very late this year.

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swiss_democracy_for_all

image.jpeg.68a5378955a983f3256e113e290fc93d.jpeg

2 or 3 woodpigeons plucked, gutted and pressure cooked in a garlicky stew are great.

Don't bother roasting them, they'll be dry and tough.

Edited by swiss_democracy_for_all
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jamanda

Mr. J has shotgun and also air rifles.  I make the pastry.  Their days are numbered but I'm keeping them up and running in storage until we're hungry.

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humdrum

Funnily enough, the solution might be a couple of cans of Asda dog food. Or any other dog food for that matter, except that Asda's stuff goes for washers.

I like to feed the wildlife because it is nice to have something to look up to and it does piss off the members of the allotment committee. And it does attract crows and rooks and foxes and rats and everything else that likes to eat pigeons. Who so far have gotten the message and left the gooseberries and most everything else alone.

I will probably go for netting next year, but right now it is nice to see the Vermin Patrol at work. In fact, the only problem so far is that I seem to have acquired a bunch of vegetarian foxes, who have taken to eating my first earlies....:)

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sarahbell
4 hours ago, spunko said:

Have you tried that silver reflective tape? Works really well, as long as there is wind. If there's a completely still day, it's next to useless.

I've not had a single strawberry from my garden yet. I'm not sure if something is eating them or if they're just very late this year.

I think we'll need tall canes up around with tape. The blackcurrants are too dense to have tape wafting near. Branches being bent down show the damage and the green-ness of the berries at the moment.

 

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Dave Bloke
4 hours ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

Don't bother roasting them, they'll be dry and tough.

Just like a DOSB

Edited by Dave Bloke
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Dave Bloke
4 hours ago, spunko said:

Have you tried that silver reflective tape?

Have you tried CDs?

James Blunt ones work very well I'm told. Just put a speaker in the garden.

 

Quote

Birds, like most creatures, can get used to certain sounds and ignore them after a while. Kelly Cross, writing in "Pollution Engineering," said sound deterrents must "vary in frequency, duration and sequence." Arranging several CDs so they play against one another in random sound patterns helps keep birds away.

 

Edited by Dave Bloke
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Caravan Monster

Wood pigeon is one of the best game meats imo. Being lazy I just take the breasts, which are the large majority of the meat on the bird. Barely need a knife, you can break the skin and peel the breasts off with your fingers. Fried and sliced with a little seasoning, very tasty.

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sarahbell
6 hours ago, Caravan Monster said:

Wood pigeon is one of the best game meats imo. Being lazy I just take the breasts, which are the large majority of the meat on the bird. Barely need a knife, you can break the skin and peel the breasts off with your fingers. Fried and sliced with a little seasoning, very tasty.

How do I catch them?

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Agent ZigZag

The other day I took the insect netting off my cauliflower bed that i am growing for the first time using the no dig method as  they were well established. What a mistake for a novice as the next day they were stripped bare. They are so destructive. It is only when you put the effort into growing your own food do you see how cruel nature can be but in equal measure so must man be to cull them. Will learn from that mistake. Got a .22 Weichrauch would love to pop the woodies as I have about 8 in my garden. However I am outvoted by the family. Still tempted to do it and get the kids involved removing the breasts to show them what is involved when eating meat.

 

 

 

 

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One percent

Cuntish neighbour feeds the bloody things. Line up on all the roof ridges round about.  At least we have seagulls to keep the buggers a bit inline. 

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sarahbell
12 minutes ago, One percent said:

Cuntish neighbour feeds the bloody things. Line up on all the roof ridges round about.  At least we have seagulls to keep the buggers a bit inline. 

Do seagulls eat wood pigeons?

We occasionally see the results of a sparrowhawk visit.but not often enough

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One percent
2 hours ago, sarahbell said:

Do seagulls eat wood pigeons?

We occasionally see the results of a sparrowhawk visit.but not often enough

No but they are right bullies. Council brought in a bird of prey to scare off the gulls. They soon saw it off.  xD

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Battenberg

Air rifle. We have loads of crows but Mr B had been taking them out one by one. Our neighbour rents the field behind us and he’s happy because they keep eating his chicken feed.

We have a bloody mahoosive pigeon that’s made a home in the tree next door and keeps coming down for the small bird feed. Even our big dog doesn’t like it and chases it off. I’m just worried it might have babies but I suspect it’s a bit late in the season for that.

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Caravan Monster
11 hours ago, sarahbell said:

How do I catch them?

Generally the unsporting method of shooting them when roosting in trees at night. The sporting method is to attract them into shooting range with decoys and shoot them from a hide in the hedge. So far as protecting veg goes there is no alternative to net. Even if you manage to shoot a few, more will always come. Shooting is harder than it looks and much more time consuming than people generally expect, especially with air rifles that most gardeners are restricted to. Not aware of an effective way to trap wood pigeons.

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jamanda
15 minutes ago, Battenberg said:

I’m just worried it might have babies but I suspect it’s a bit late in the season for that.

Wrong.  They are at it all the time here.  Obviously I avert my eyes.

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Democorruptcy
10 hours ago, One percent said:

Cuntish neighbour feeds the bloody things. Line up on all the roof ridges round about.  At least we have seagulls to keep the buggers a bit inline. 

That's a bit OCD, I doubt their formation would matter to most people.

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sarahbell
1 hour ago, Caravan Monster said:

Generally the unsporting method of shooting them when roosting in trees at night. The sporting method is to attract them into shooting range with decoys and shoot them from a hide in the hedge. So far as protecting veg goes there is no alternative to net. Even if you manage to shoot a few, more will always come. Shooting is harder than it looks and much more time consuming than people generally expect, especially with air rifles that most gardeners are restricted to. Not aware of an effective way to trap wood pigeons.

There's a trao but it's sixty quid nearly.

Mind you they've eaten sixty quids worth of fruit per plot 

I know a pest controller who might have a idea.ive not sent him any wasp calls for a while though

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Great Guy

I've shot a fair few pigeons....

Shotgun is good if you have one...

Better is probably an airgun at night time. They sit on a roost and you can shoot them. You either use a night vision scope or get someone to light them up with a torch.

Air rifle struggles to kill them though. You  might have to stomp some to death. 

I used the dead ones as fertilser for my trees :)

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sarahbell
6 hours ago, Great Guy said:

I've shot a fair few pigeons....

Shotgun is good if you have one...

Better is probably an airgun at night time. They sit on a roost and you can shoot them. You either use a night vision scope or get someone to light them up with a torch.

Air rifle struggles to kill them though. You  might have to stomp some to death. 

I used the dead ones as fertilser for my trees :)

I know someone good with a gun. He goes and deals with rabbits for people. 
I don't know where they roost.

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sarahbell

Was chatting on the allotment and they started appearing down the bottom end of the site. So I pointed out to the lady I was talking to what they do to fruit bushes. They'd wondered if the branches were really laden down with fruit and that's why they were bent on to the ground.

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