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spygirl

OAPs driving automatics

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Worthy of record.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-41900744

'A 90-year-old driver who killed a couple by reversing into them has been given a two-year suspended sentence.

Philip Bull made a "genuine but catastrophic mistake" when he backed into Clare Haslam, 44, and Deborah Clifton, 49, outside Withington Hospital, a judge said.

Manchester Crown Court heard Bull pressed the accelerator instead of the brake in his automatic car.'

 

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I sort of understand why they haven't jailed him. It would be pointless. he would cost us a huge amount of money and he isn't a risk to anyone - ASSUMING he isn't driving anymore. 

If he's looking after his wife at home then he is already in a prison. 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Worthy of record.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-41900744

'A 90-year-old driver who killed a couple by reversing into them has been given a two-year suspended sentence.

Philip Bull made a "genuine but catastrophic mistake" when he backed into Clare Haslam, 44, and Deborah Clifton, 49, outside Withington Hospital, a judge said.

Manchester Crown Court heard Bull pressed the accelerator instead of the brake in his automatic car.'

 

I have seen geriatrics do the same a couple of times, though they hit walls rather than people. One old boy almost got his wife as she was walking into a restaurant, but fortunately for her the door was recessed. 

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One of my clients did the same hit the accelerator shot backwards out of her drive and crashed into the wall opposite lots the kids play on the street as well she was lucky.

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I've seen a number of reversing incidents (fortunately no injuries) in supermarket car parks - all age groups and both male and female.  One youngish bloke in a suit said he hadn't looked when reversing -  quite unconcerned about doing that he was. 

There's no accounting for careless/crazy drivers - they come in all shapes and sizes.

With increasing congestion the risks are bound to increase.

Edited by twocents

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6 minutes ago, twocents said:

I've seen a number of reversing incidents (fortunately no injuries) in supermarket car parks - all age groups and both male and female.  One youngish bloke in a suit said he hadn't looked when reversing -  quite unconcerned about doing that he was. 

There's no accounting for careless/crazy drivers - they come in all shapes and sizes.

With increasing congestion the risks are bound to increase.

This is why I drive a crap old car. I don't mind (too much) if someone bumps it :)

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21 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

When will a government have in its manifesto to make 75 year olds retake their driving test? So many OAPs should NOT be behind the wheel. I watched one earlier try to do a three point turn, she had to physically look at what gear she was in every time, and still dented someone's car.

Just managed to retire my parents from driving. It was worrying until they did so. But also, I'm also sure we only need to look at the cost of car insurance versus driver age and car model to see who should and shouldn't be driving

Edited by Hopeful

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7 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

Just managed to retire my parents form driving. It was worrying until they did. But also, I'm also sure we only need to look at the cost of car insurance versus driver age and car model to see who should and shouldn't be driving

The chart below is quite interesting and although it's the US I imagine the UK is similar. 

I expect that older drivers might have more small bumps but fewer serious accidents and that's likely reflected in the insurance rates?

Related image

.

 

Edited by twocents

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Just now, twocents said:

The chart below is quite interesting although it's the US I imagine the UK is similar. 

I expect that older drivers might have more small bumps but fewer serious accidents and that's likely relfected in the insurance rates?

Related image

.

 

 

I expect so,

Apart from confused cock-ups such as hitting the accelerator when they meant the brake, speed and a feeling of invincibility generally decreases with age

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6 minutes ago, dgul said:

That chart is deeply flawed as it doesn't take into account miles/yr.  Given that 75+ won't be commuting, etc, I'd say those stats are pretty bad for the oldies.

That said, the stats I've seen in the UK don't support older drivers being more dangerous.  What they largely do do is self-police -- they'll slowly give up on motorways, driving at night, driving in the rush hour, driving in the rain until the point several years later that they give up completely.  This self-policing does reduce their accident rates significantly.

Isn't the chart 'speeding drivers' ?

So speed as a factor in accidents decreases with age

Edited by Hopeful

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16 minutes ago, dgul said:

That chart is deeply flawed as it doesn't take into account miles/yr.  Given that 75+ won't be commuting, etc, I'd say those stats are pretty bad for the oldies.

That said, the stats I've seen in the UK don't support older drivers being more dangerous.  What they largely do do is self-police -- they'll slowly give up on motorways, driving at night, driving in the rush hour, driving in the rain until the point several years later that they give up completely.  This self-policing does reduce their accident rates significantly.

I wouldn't go so far as to say those stats are bad for the oldies but as you suggest if everything is taken into account then maybe they're not quite as good as the chart portrays - but the risks are reflected in the average insurance premiums.

It still shows that older drivers are involved in fewer speed related serious accidents which I think is likely to be typical of all serious accidents. 

That chart was only from a brief search and it would be interesting to see the chart taking into account miles/year.   I also expect there might be a relationship of an individuals quality of driving when young with their quality of driving as they get old but I don't expect there to be a chart showing that.  I know some people just don't like driving so might give up on it quicker than others.

Edited by twocents

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16 minutes ago, dgul said:

That chart is deeply flawed as it doesn't take into account miles/yr.  Given that 75+ won't be commuting, etc, I'd say those stats are pretty bad for the oldies.

That said, the stats I've seen in the UK don't support older drivers being more dangerous.  What they largely do do is self-police -- they'll slowly give up on motorways, driving at night, driving in the rush hour, driving in the rain until the point several years later that they give up completely.  This self-policing does reduce their accident rates significantly.

It also doesn't take into account the fact that OAPs cause accidents but aren't directly involved in them. A general poor driving ability, as seen frequently with pensioners, will mean others take risks to get round you which can indirectly cause accidents etc.

EG for me: driver stopping at a clear roundabout = automatic overtake.

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18 minutes ago, twocents said:

I wouldn't go so far as to say those stats are bad for the oldies but as you suggest if everything is taken into account then maybe they're not quite as good as the portrays - but the risks are reflected in the average insurance premiums.

It still shows that older drivers are involved in fewer speed related serious accidents which I think is likely to be typical of all serious accidents. 

That chart was only from a brief search and it would be interesting to see the chart taking into account miles/year.   I also expect there might be a relationship of an individuals quality of driving when young with their quality of driving as they get old but I don't expect there to be a chart showing that.  I know some people just don't like driving so might give up on it quicker than others.

The fallacy that insurers price based on risk alone is pervasive. The fact is that if insurers charged more for OAPs to match the increased risk, then they would simply not drive and therefore would be of no benefit to insurers. Young people by comparison have the bank of mum and dad to foot some of the bill. Consider the number of miles per year driven by an OAP versus the 'decreased' incidence of reported prangs. How many miles does the average pensioner do annually, 2,000? Extrapolate that with a 40 year old driver who does 25,000 a year and the number of accidents each, and we'd all see how terrible these OAP drivers are.

Frankly I am close to refusing to insure my cars nowadays, even though I am not that young now, but the costs are going up by 20% every year despite the fact I have 10 years of NCB. Do any DOSBODers not pay car insurance out of interest? Out in the sticks I never see police, and rarely see ANPR cameras. I'm sure I could get away with it.... o.O I've driven on a SORN before, for years, and nothing came of it.

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1 minute ago, spunko2010 said:

It also doesn't take into account the fact that OAPs cause accidents but aren't directly involved in them. A general poor driving ability, as seen frequently with pensioners, will mean others take risks to get round you which can indirectly cause accidents etc.

The Mr Magoo series often used to portray that sort of thing and they're a good laugh.  Of course he shouldn't have been driving because he would fail the eye test which I believe applies to all ages.

I think the offical view on those circumstances (overtaking etc) is drive for the conditions.

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5 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

It also doesn't take into account the fact that OAPs cause accidents but aren't directly involved in them. A general poor driving ability, as seen frequently with pensioners, will mean others take risks to get round you which can indirectly cause accidents etc.

EG for me: driver stopping at a clear roundabout = automatic overtake.

Ahhh, poor driving by both parties.

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