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shindigger

Glad im 50. Glad i don't have kids because....

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

That about sums up reality.  :)

Each family is different. Mrs DeepLurker freely admits that if I wasn't around, she'd probably die of malnutrition within a couple of months.

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2 minutes ago, One percent said:

That about sums up reality.  :)

I know that's tongue in cheek but the only couples in which I recognise that reality are the ones in which the wife is bad tempered and shrewish and the husband has just been beaten down by it over the years until playing the good natured simpleton becomes second nature to him; how many times do you have to be told you're useless before you start believing it?  The counter examples of the defeated wife seem very much to be amongst the older generation and, more importantly, generally thought to be a bad thing.

This situation is very much a minority amongst the couples I know but I don't think it helps to disseminate it as being both ok and the norm.

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7 minutes ago, JackieO said:

I've noticed the MSM loves dead dads, they only good dad is dead one apparently 9_9

 

Cultural marxism emasculating men since WW2 >:(

Men have brought it on themselves to be fair. Nowadays it is socially acceptable to be a lazy slacker or manchild with no career, ambition or family well into the 20s and 30s.  I was educated in the Dark Labour years i.e. the depths of a cultural Marxist state school in the late 90s and yet I have never been out of work. Got a part-time job when I was 16 and went full-time after school. Seems to me that cultural Marxism is  the de rigeur excuse for the slovenly in society.

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1 minute ago, JoeDavola said:

"Mum calls Dad the 4th child of the family. Since they got married, Mum and Dad have had sex a total of 3 times. Mum frequently belittles Dad in front of their 3 children, and Dad says nothing because he doesn't want to be a chauvinist. Mum and her friends frequently meet up and slag their husbands off. Mum has been talking to an ex-boyfriend on Facebook, since she feels that Dad is not meeting her emotional needs. She's just not feeling it any more."

Should I merge this thread with the Deluded Old Scrappers one? xD

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8 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

"Mum calls Dad the 4th child of the family. Since they got married, Mum and Dad have had sex a total of 3 times. Mum frequently belittles Dad in front of their 3 children, and Dad says nothing because he doesn't want to be a chauvinist. Mum and her friends frequently meet up and slag their husbands off. Mum has been talking to an ex-boyfriend on Facebook, since she feels that Dad is not meeting her emotional needs. She's just not feeling it any more."

Have you been reading my poetry journal?

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11 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

Men have brought it on themselves to be fair. Nowadays it is socially acceptable to be a lazy slacker or manchild with no career, ambition or family well into the 20s and 30s.  I was educated in the Dark Labour years i.e. the depths of a cultural Marxist state school in the late 90s and yet I have never been out of work. Got a part-time job when I was 16 and went full-time after school. Seems to me that cultural Marxism is  the de rigeur excuse for the slovenly in society.

Or just simple cossetting.  I knew a small number of people who were basically ejected from their homes back in the 80s on the ground that they were, say, 18.  And per the not born wealthy thread my motivation at times when I've wanted to not bother, and that of most people, has been the necessity to earn a living.

I have watched somebody indulge their children to a ridiculous degree and now their second eldest has joined the eldest in dropping out of uni in their first year because the course, and the privations of living on your own with little money, are too hard.

Well it is hard, and lonely, and a shock.  But you will get used to it.  Your first job is a much bigger shock so if you can't cope with first year uni you have no chance.

But if you have no backbone or rather the necessity (hey, it was hard and a shock to me too) to put up with that shock then you won't.  But congratulations you have managed to write off all career propsects by the age of 25.

 

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3 minutes ago, dgul said:

It is just an old fashioned book from before the gender enlightenment.

This is what a normal family looks like:

Gender-Fluid-Family-30.jpg

Is this the scene from Return of the Jedi, with 2 jabba's?

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15 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

  I was educated in the Dark Labour years i.e. the depths of a cultural Marxist state school in the late 90s and yet I have never been out of work. Got a part-time job when I was 16 and went full-time after school. Seems to me that cultural Marxism is  the de rigeur excuse for the slovenly in society.

Yep some of us steered clear but many fell for for it hook line and sinker.

 

Take my other half's ex wife, a privately educated vicars daughter now tax credited up, living in a shitsville housing association flat, morbidly obese, Guardianista with a huge victim complex.

Go on mumsnet and criticise benefits scroungers and you'll bag yourself a net-full of the same type.:S

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10 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Or just simple cossetting.  I knew a small number of people who were basically ejected from their homes back in the 80s on the ground that they were, say, 18.  And per the not born wealthy thread my motivation at times when I've wanted to not bother, and that of most people, has been the necessity to earn a living.

I have watched somebody indulge their children to a ridiculous degree and now their second eldest has joined the eldest in dropping out of uni in their first year because the course, and the privations of living on your own with little money, are too hard.

Well it is hard, and lonely, and a shock.  But you will get used to it.  Your first job is a much bigger shock so if you can't cope with first year uni you have no chance.

But if you have no backbone or rather the necessity (hey, it was hard and a shock to me too) to put up with that shock then you won't.  But congratulations you have managed to write off all career propsects by the age of 25.

 

Yeah I know a bloke pushing 30 who's always lived with his mum, never worked more than a few months at a time, and is just finishing off his useless philosophy degree. By the time he graduates he will actually be less employable than he was when he left school at 16.

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2 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

Yeah I know a bloke pushing 30 who's always lived with his mum, never worked more than a few months at a time, and is just finishing off his useless philosophy degree. By the time he graduates he will actually be less employable than he was when he left school at 16.

I know people like this, it's a bit close to home to write in depth about. They say they want to work but I'm not convinced. They are convinced it's a vicious cycle, eg I can't get a job because I have nothing worthwhile to put on my CV.

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7 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

Yeah I know a bloke pushing 30 who's always lived with his mum, never worked more than a few months at a time, and is just finishing off his useless philosophy degree. By the time he graduates he will actually be less employable than he was when he left school at 16.

My mum threw me out at 28.

It was the best thing she ever did for me.

I tell the kids that tale often. ;)

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10 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

Yeah I know a bloke pushing 30 who's always lived with his mum, never worked more than a few months at a time, and is just finishing off his useless philosophy degree. By the time he graduates he will actually be less employable than he was when he left school at 16.

 

7 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

I know people like this, it's a bit close to home to write in depth about. They say they want to work but I'm not convinced. They are convinced it's a vicious cycle, eg I can't get a job because I have nothing worthwhile to put on my CV.

 

1 minute ago, JackieO said:

My mum threw me out at 28.

It was the best thing she ever did for me.

I tell the kids that tale often. ;)

It is.

Employers aren't stupid; they are not going to take a gamble on some 30 year old who has never held down a job whne they could take the safe bet of a thirty year old who has worked continually for ten years and been at each previous employer a decent amount of time and has a valid reason for leaving each job.

I could very well have been Joe's mate.  I am bookish and lazy and the only way I have become both good at and accepting or even liking of work is by doing it; I don't see that there is another way.  Though in my case it was partly ambition just edging it over my parents' pushing me out.  I wanted to study that degree, I wanted to work in the City.  To be fair most people with whom I studied were the same though that does seem to have been unusual even at the time and it is probably vanishingly rare now.

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Here we go, another example of snowflak-ism.

https://archive.is/man4o

Quote

DOMINIC SANDBROOK: The work-shy teacher who is a taste of what's to come when the snowflake generation runs Britain

PUBLISHED: 01:01, 8 November 2017 | UPDATED: 07:23, 8 November 2017
 
 
Some 80 years ago, the American government produced a pamphlet encouraging people into work.
It explained that being idle was just about the worst thing imaginable, because it meant the loss of self-respect, pride and hope. By contrast, it went on: 'Let's look at what work does for us. Work keeps us from going nuts.'
I sometimes wonder what would happen if our Government distributed such a pamphlet today. 
How long would it take for people to demand an apology? How long before the first online petition passed 10,000 signatures?
For one thing, there is that incendiary world 'nuts', which would have mental health campaigners steaming with outrage. But even worse, surely, is the emphasis on hard work.
 
Eddie Ledsham (pictured), from Wallasey, Merseyside, says he was warned by tutors that his first year in employment would be hard but decided to quit because he couldn't cope
Eddie Ledsham (pictured), from Wallasey, Merseyside, says he was warned by tutors that his first year in employment would be hard but decided to quit because he couldn't cope

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You might wonder what on earth is wrong with hard work. What's so bad about putting in the hours, knuckling down and getting something done?
Well, just ask Eddie Ledsham, of Wallasey, Merseyside. 
For as the Mail reported yesterday, the 22-year-old has just left the teaching profession after being unable to cope with what he considered as a nightmarishly back-breaking workload.
As he admitted in an online video, he had been warned by his tutors that his first year in the job, teaching eight-year-olds at a school on the Wirral, would be tough. 
Alas, not even this prepared him for the 'astronomical' burden to come.
Shocked
As he explained, he had so much to do that he found himself thinking about it 'on the train to and from work'. 
Because he stayed late to devise his lesson plans and mark pupils' work, he sometimes did not get home until 6.30pm. (I know — 6.30! No, that is not a misprint.)
But even that was not the worst of it. 'If I went to watch football with friends, I'd have to shoot off as soon as it finished because I'd have work to do,' said an outraged Mr Ledsham.
'The times I'd go and see my then girlfriend, I'd have to sit and do marking while she cooked or something.'
Eddie Ledsham blamed the pressure of impossible hours, unrealistic targets and finishing at 6.30pm after studying and earning a degree in teaching from university 
Eddie Ledsham blamed the pressure of impossible hours, unrealistic targets and finishing at 6.30pm after studying and earning a degree in teaching from university 
When I first read the story, I wondered if Mr Ledsham was being serious. But he appears to be genuinely shocked that he sometimes had to work after watching the football.
Still, since Mr Ledsham is only 22, perhaps he can be excused a little naivety. 
But I think his story is part of a bigger trend, reflecting the values of a generation who have been taught to shun the world, rather than to embrace it, and seeing themselves as victims, rather than as doers.
You have probably read about the emergence of a 'snowflake' generation in our universities, who take offence at the slightest provocation, demand 'trigger warnings' before classes and campaign to have supposedly racist statues torn down.
But these students have not sprung into life from nowhere. They are the products of a wider culture of self-indulgent victimhood, not just in our schools, but in millions of homes. 
And now, of course, they are growing up. They are not just schoolchildren with scrubbed faces, or students suffused with moral indignation. 
They are now becoming parents themselves, passing on their sense of entitlement to the next generation.
The 'Get a Grip' initiative in East Sussex tells parents there are 'no good reasons' for missing school and that children sick with colds and headaches should be forced out of bed and into class
The 'Get a Grip' initiative in East Sussex tells parents there are 'no good reasons' for missing school and that children sick with colds and headaches should be forced out of bed and into class
And if you doubt it, consider another story this week. It concerned parents in East Sussex who were infuriated by a council campaign to cut down on poor school attendance.
Under the heading 'Get a Grip', the council warned parents that there were 'no good reasons' for missing school, apart from a 'genuine medical condition'. 
If children had a 'headache or cold', the council said, they should still go to school, adding that 'your child is still able to go to school when they feel tired'. 
And it offered tips for parents on 'being more organised', from getting breakfast ready to setting an early-morning alarm.
All good advice, if a bit obvious. But clearly it was not obvious to everybody, since the council was disturbed that school attendance figures were 'simply not good enough'.
Apology
Personally, I think the council should be applauded for laying down the law so bluntly. 
Parents who keep their children at home because they are looking a bit tired are doing them a gross disservice. 
Life is about coping with setbacks and annoyances; it is about keeping going when you feel ropey.
Yet some parents see things differently. Ella Lewis, a mother from Seaford, even set up an online petition — that favourite recourse of the social-media-obsessed snowflake — demanding the council scrap the 'Get a Grip' campaign.
In her own words, she and her comrades were not merely 'shocked', they felt 'blindly attacked and undermined'. 
 
And in classic snowflake style, the petition demands the council 'make a public apology'.
By now there can be no institution in the land that has not been asked to make a public apology for something or other. 
For the campaigning classes, an apology, however insincere, is the Holy Grail.
In that supreme snowflake newsletter, The Guardian, somebody demands an apology for something almost every day. 
Britain once led the world in making things; we now lead the world in making apologies, or least in asking for them.
All this is the product of a culture that shrinks from challenges, disdains hard work and tries to wish away the harsher realities of life.
It has, I suppose, become a bit of a cliche to moan about the 'all-must-have-prizes culture' of today's schools. 
And yet only last month it emerged that Highgate School, in North London, had indeed abolished its annual prize-giving ceremony.
According to the head of its lower school, Stuart Evans, it was 'not right for pupils who were not prize-winners to sit through an event where prize-winners are being singled out'.
It has, I suppose, become a bit of a cliche to moan about the 'all-must-have-prizes culture' of today's schools. And yet only last month it emerged that Highgate School (pictured), in North London, had indeed abolished its annual prize-giving ceremony, writes Dominic Sandbrook
It has, I suppose, become a bit of a cliche to moan about the 'all-must-have-prizes culture' of today's schools. And yet only last month it emerged that Highgate School (pictured), in North London, had indeed abolished its annual prize-giving ceremony, writes Dominic Sandbrook
Presumably Mr Evans also objects to ceremonies such as the Oscars, where nominated actors and actresses have to watch their peers being applauded, or the Booker Prize, where short-listed authors watch the winner being singled out for acclaim.
You might think that learning to cope with disappointment is a crucial part of growing up. 
You might think that coming second, or third, or even last, is something that all children have to get used to eventually.
Similarly, you might think children need to learn how to go to school despite a cold. 
And you might even think that, yes, sometimes grown men need to go home after the football to catch up on their marking.
There was a time when people found pride in soldiering on. They told stories about explorers, soldiers, mountaineers and adventurers who had risked their lives to defy overwhelming odds.
Tough
Yet I worry we are raising a generation for whom soldiering on is inconceivable. 
They expect to be mollycoddled at every turn, shielded from harsh realities and unsettling opinions in the 'safe spaces' of schools and universities.
But the world itself is not a safe space. It can be tough and unforgiving. Being offended, being disappointed, feeling tired and working hard are all part of being human.
If we insulate our children from those realities, we are simply setting them up to fail.
For though Highgate School might have scrapped its prize-giving to avoid upsetting the little darlings, you can be sure that in other countries — and especially in the rising powers of Asia — the spirit of competition is alive and well.
And if things go on as they are, then one day an entire generation of little Britons will be left watching miserably as their foreign counterparts walk away with all the prizes.
Mind you, I suppose there is a good chance the British wouldn't even be invited. After all, the organisers wouldn't want to hurt our feelings

 

Fucking whinging little shit.

I hope he gets fuck all work after this, imagine doing a quick google search and this coming up, questions in interview 'why did you leave last job' etc

... wanker.

 

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1 minute ago, JFK said:

Here we go, another example of snowflak-ism.

https://archive.is/man4o

 

Fucking whinging little shit.

I hope he gets fuck all work after this, imagine doing a quick google search and this coming up, questions in interview 'why did you leave last job' etc

... wanker.

 

He won't will he, he has just shown that he can't handle a stressful job; and I accept that teaching is.  Most people find their first proper job incredibly hard and want to pack it in (definite yes and yes from me) but don't because they apprecaite that: work is hard and after the first job it will get better and the pay will go up.

He'll be doing part time and shift work form now on; he'll probably be much happier in that anyway.

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