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Zanu Bob

CEO pay:charity begins at home.....

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This comment from Masked Tulip reminded of one of my personal bete noires

' I read something a few months back looking at the top charities in the UK and, IIRC, most were only spending about 40% of charitable income at most - the other 60% going on running costs - i.e. salaries and pensions. '

 

https://www.thirdsector.co.uk/charity-pay-study-2017-highest-earners/special-report/article/1427306

' The British Red Cross also paid its highest earner £173,000, about £30,000 less than in the 2015 study. Fourteen of the top 100 charities paid their highest earners more than £300,000, compared with 12 in 2015. Thirty-seven charities paid more than £200,000, compared with 32 in the 2015 study. But some charities paid their highest earners considerably less than in previous years. The highest-paid employee at the London Clinic earned between £540,000 and £550,000, compared with £850,000 to £860,000 in the 2015 study. The salary awarded to the highest-paid employee at St Andrew's Healthcare has fallen by more than £300,000 since the 2015 study.

 

The study also includes the total number of staff in each organisation who were paid more than £60,000. Charities are required to state in their annual accounts how many employees earn above this amount. Save the Children International employed the highest number of staff earning above £60,000 (375), and was followed by the British Council with 339. In the top 100, the International Rescue Committee had the fewest employees earning more than £60,000, paying just two more than this amount.

But others in the sector urge restraint over senior executive pay levels. Stella Smith, a governance consultant and Third Sector columnist, says that it is not always clear what special qualities senior manager have that justify such salaries, and neither is there any evidence that over time high pay results in better performance. She believes it is unwise for organisations to become so dependent on individual staff members that they feel they have to pay them substantial amounts.

"If charities don't have enough skilled people, surely it would make more sense to invest in developing their staff instead of paying senior managers more," she says.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/charities-in-pound5bn-pensions-deficit-v3mbf7wvxzf

'SOME of the UK’s best known charities are facing potentially catastrophic deficits in their pension funds with the top 40 having a combined £5.5bn black hole in their accounts.

There are fears that charities will be forced to use public donations to plug the gaps in their funds.

The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (GDBA) received more than £60m from the public in its last financial year, but more than 10% of that amount was used to pay off the pension fund deficit of £22m.'

Edited by Zanu Bob

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54 minutes ago, Zanu Bob said:

The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (GDBA) received more than £60m from the public in its last financial year, but more than 10% of that amount was used to pay off the pension fund deficit of £22m.'

Good post about the state of charities in the uk. Personally I now give to very few charities and prefer to give to local causes where I’m sure the money goes directly to those who require some assistance.

@One percent posted a good link a while ago about the percentage of donations that reach those who the charity states they aim to help!

I know a blind person whose guide dog died over six months ago. This person walked miles every day locally and also regularly visited Edinburgh and Glasgow via train with the help of their lovely and utterly amazing guide dog.

Person still waiting for a new guide dog although it’s getting close now.

Meantime the person’s life is marred because they weren’t born into wealth and can’t afford to pay.

While I would like to donate for people to access guide dogs I refuse to do so because I don’t want to pay for pension decifits or extortionate pays in the charity sector. 

The person I know is lucky and has family, friends and acquaintances who are helping them through a rough patch. Unfortunately all people with no means to finance the extortionate cost of a new guide dog.

The cost IMO is because charity has lost its way with extortionate pay and pensions. Perhaps if retirement wasn’t being pushed to ages where we have one foot in the grave we could find a way for older, interested and dedicated people with retirement income for living costs to organise and provide services such as guide dogs for the blind without extortionate pay and pensions? Charity has lost the way IMO it’s just a business now with high earners creaming at the top exploiting unemployed and generous people at the bottom.

 

 

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8 hours ago, Zanu Bob said:

This comment from Masked Tulip reminded of one of my personal bete noires

' I read something a few months back looking at the top charities in the UK and, IIRC, most were only spending about 40% of charitable income at most - the other 60% going on running costs - i.e. salaries and pensions. '

 

https://www.thirdsector.co.uk/charity-pay-study-2017-highest-earners/special-report/article/1427306

' The British Red Cross also paid its highest earner £173,000, about £30,000 less than in the 2015 study. Fourteen of the top 100 charities paid their highest earners more than £300,000, compared with 12 in 2015. Thirty-seven charities paid more than £200,000, compared with 32 in the 2015 study. But some charities paid their highest earners considerably less than in previous years. The highest-paid employee at the London Clinic earned between £540,000 and £550,000, compared with £850,000 to £860,000 in the 2015 study. The salary awarded to the highest-paid employee at St Andrew's Healthcare has fallen by more than £300,000 since the 2015 study.

 

The study also includes the total number of staff in each organisation who were paid more than £60,000. Charities are required to state in their annual accounts how many employees earn above this amount. Save the Children International employed the highest number of staff earning above £60,000 (375), and was followed by the British Council with 339. In the top 100, the International Rescue Committee had the fewest employees earning more than £60,000, paying just two more than this amount.

But others in the sector urge restraint over senior executive pay levels. Stella Smith, a governance consultant and Third Sector columnist, says that it is not always clear what special qualities senior manager have that justify such salaries, and neither is there any evidence that over time high pay results in better performance. She believes it is unwise for organisations to become so dependent on individual staff members that they feel they have to pay them substantial amounts.

"If charities don't have enough skilled people, surely it would make more sense to invest in developing their staff instead of paying senior managers more," she says.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/charities-in-pound5bn-pensions-deficit-v3mbf7wvxzf

'SOME of the UK’s best known charities are facing potentially catastrophic deficits in their pension funds with the top 40 having a combined £5.5bn black hole in their accounts.

There are fears that charities will be forced to use public donations to plug the gaps in their funds.

The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (GDBA) received more than £60m from the public in its last financial year, but more than 10% of that amount was used to pay off the pension fund deficit of £22m.'

It was Brown - seriously. He stuff them full of people in his group.

The pension deficit is because the people are inumerate.

Any charity or public sector body should not be earning more than 150k - the pressures and the like just do not tally with the private sector.

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I really hate to admit this here but both my daughters want to work for charities. They see it as an altruistic move, giving something back 9_9

i have attempted to explain to them, the true nature of charities and they way that it is just very well paid make work for some.  They are prepared to take a pay cut to work for a charity. 

Fuck only knows where I went wrong in bringing them up.   

Edited by One percent

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20 minutes ago, One percent said:

I really hate to admit this here but both my daughters want to work for charities. They see it as an altruistic move, giving something back 9_9

i have attempted to explain to them, the true nature of charities and they way that it is just very well paid make work for some.  They are prepared to take a pay cut to work for a charity. 

Fuck only knows where I went wrong in bringing them up.   

I was walking along a public footpath on National Trust land recently. Two salaried NT Rangers were standing with their arms folded while they watched the 20 or so volunteers they were organising to clear gorse.

Edited by Hopeful

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9 hours ago, Economic Exile said:

Good post about the state of charities in the uk. Personally I now give to very few charities and prefer to give to local causes where I’m sure the money goes directly to those who require some assistance.

@One percent posted a good link a while ago about the percentage of donations that reach those who the charity states they aim to help!

I know a blind person whose guide dog died over six months ago. This person walked miles every day locally and also regularly visited Edinburgh and Glasgow via train with the help of their lovely and utterly amazing guide dog.

Person still waiting for a new guide dog although it’s getting close now.

Meantime the person’s life is marred because they weren’t born into wealth and can’t afford to pay.

While I would like to donate for people to access guide dogs I refuse to do so because I don’t want to pay for pension decifits or extortionate pays in the charity sector. 

The person I know is lucky and has family, friends and acquaintances who are helping them through a rough patch. Unfortunately all people with no means to finance the extortionate cost of a new guide dog.

The cost IMO is because charity has lost its way with extortionate pay and pensions. Perhaps if retirement wasn’t being pushed to ages where we have one foot in the grave we could find a way for older, interested and dedicated people with retirement income for living costs to organise and provide services such as guide dogs for the blind without extortionate pay and pensions? Charity has lost the way IMO it’s just a business now with high earners creaming at the top exploiting unemployed and generous people at the bottom.

 

 

Mrs Bob used to donate to save the children until, I pointed out that her monthly contribution was just about covering the 15 minute break of the CEO once a month.

I'd love one percent to post that link.

Mrs Bob knows well enough when they knock on the door to stand back and take fifteen to herself while I explain to the chugger how much their CEO earns and why I won't be funding their tea breaks.

Like you I give to small charities with committed volunteers where £20 buys £20 of food in Africa that's delivered by volunteers.

I understand how chariddees became so big but it don't make it right what they do.

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1 hour ago, Hopeful said:

I was walking along a public footpath on National Trust land recently. Two salaried NT Rangers were standing with their arms folded while they watched the 20 or so volunteers they were organising to clear gorse.

Bet theyd never see their 40s either.

Ive seen various NT and NP staff. Like some babyboomer slave lords.

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2 hours ago, One percent said:

I really hate to admit this here but both my daughters want to work for charities. They see it as an altruistic move, giving something back 9_9

i have attempted to explain to them, the true nature of charities and they way that it is just very well paid make work for some.  They are prepared to take a pay cut to work for a charity. 

Fuck only knows where I went wrong in bringing them up.   

You got a link to that piece you psoted a while back about where the money goes?

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Just now, Zanu Bob said:

Mrs Bob used to donate to save the children until, I pointed out that her monthly contribution was just about covering the 15 minute break of the CEO once a month.

I'd love one percent to post that link.

Mrs Bob knows well enough when they knock on the door to stand back and take fifteen to herself while I explain to the chugger how much their CEO earns and why I won't be funding their tea breaks.

Like you I give to small charities with committed volunteers where £20 buys £20 of food in Africa that's delivered by volunteers.

I understand how chariddees became so big but it don't make it right what they do.

Chuggers work for another company.

They are contracted to go door2door.

Amazing thing charities. In 10-15 years theyve thrown away all goodwill built up over the last 50-100 years.

So, charities have vastly increased the CEo - and the rest of the boards pay - to increase 'efficiency'.

All thats happened is the wage bill has gone up, the money spent on good causes have gone down, and the future collections have fallen off the cliff.

Genius.

 

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2 hours ago, One percent said:

I really hate to admit this here but both my daughters want to work for charities. They see it as an altruistic move, giving something back 9_9

i have attempted to explain to them, the true nature of charities and they way that it is just very well paid make work for some.  They are prepared to take a pay cut to work for a charity. 

Fuck only knows where I went wrong in bringing them up.   

BBC/teachers/gubbermint these days is very much pushing the centre left line that the govt can solve all your problems and that whatever gone wrong in your life,it's someone elses fault.

Our politicians are gutless,but we've known that for a long time.

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https://www.channel4.com/news/factcheck/how-much-charities-spend-good-causes

How much do charities spend on their charitable activities?

As of December 2016, there were 167,000 registered charities in England and Wales, with a collective annual income of over £70 billion.

Data from the UK Civil Society Almanac shows that in 2014-15, charities spent around £42 billion of their income.

Using that data, we’ve calculated that between 60 and 70 per cent of charities’ annual spending goes on “charitable activities” – i.e. providing the services or fulfilling the duties that the charity exists to provide.

Administration (often chalked up as “governance”) as well as spending on fundraising are the next largest costs. And these are at least in part designed to generate future income for the organisation.

 

'image.png.cf9e46476ce69e613f1f5b1e63290423.png

Charity spending: size does matter

But that figure only gives us part of the picture. When we break it down by charity size, we can see that the very smallest and the very largest charities spend much less on their charitable objectives as a proportion of their total expenditure.

 

image.png.e0b00dcf5c19c9e37257c8e30f6a977a.png

“Small and micro” charities – i.e. those with an annual income of under £100,000 – dedicated just 60 per cent of their spending to charitable activities in 2014-15.

At the other end of the spectrum, so-called “super-major” organisations – i.e. those with an annual income of £100 million or more – spent a similar proportion on charitable activities, at just under 64 per cent.

That said, the largest charities actually saw their incomes go up in recent years, while the smallest players have got even smaller. So it’s harder to explain why super-major organisation have been spending relatively little on their charitable activities.

Medium-sized operations performed best, with nearly three quarters of their money going towards charitable activities.

But with all of these statistics, it’s worth remembering that this is an average position. Any one charity may well spend much more or less on charitable activities. The Charity Commission website allows you to find out more about the spending of an individual organisation.

What about staff salaries?

The average boss of the UK’s top 100 charities is paid £255,000 a year, according to analysis by Third Sector. Fourteen of those charities paid their highest earners more than £300,000.

But a report by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) found that of all registered charities, 91 per cent have no paid staff at all and are run by volunteers. The remaining 9% provide jobs for 800,000 people. Fewer than 1% of charities employ a member of staff earning £60,000 or more.'

3 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Chuggers work for another company.

They are contracted to go door2door.

Amazing thing charities. In 10-15 years theyve thrown away all goodwill built up over the last 50-100 years.

So, charities have vastly increased the CEo - and the rest of the boards pay - to increase 'efficiency'.

All thats happened is the wage bill has gone up, the money spent on good causes have gone down, and the future collections have fallen off the cliff.

Genius.

 

That's even worse.Genuinely stunned.

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2 hours ago, One percent said:

I really hate to admit this here but both my daughters want to work for charities. They see it as an altruistic move, giving something back 9_9

i have attempted to explain to them, the true nature of charities and they way that it is just very well paid make work for some.  They are prepared to take a pay cut to work for a charity. 

Fuck only knows where I went wrong in bringing them up.   

They are virtue signalling.  It is ingrained in them at school.  Feelings are topmost.

Reality is, they are the easiest to exploit.

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2 hours ago, spygirl said:

It was Brown - seriously. He stuff them full of people in his group.

The pension deficit is because the people are inumerate.

Any charity or public sector body should not be earning more than 150k - the pressures and the like just do not tally with the private sector.

Jackie Ballard.4 years in Theftminster as an MP followed by taking the reins of the RSPCA in 2002............

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Ballard

'In September 2002, she was appointed Director General of the RSPCA. Her appointment was criticised[by whom?] as she was seen as too inexperienced. The controversy continued as, to solve the financial problems the RSPCA was facing, she made substantial changes, including 300 job cuts. However, by 2004 the RSPCA had balanced its books and made £7 million savings, seeming to vindicate Ballard's approach.[citation needed]

Ballard was appointed Chief Executive of the RNID in October 2007.[6] She was appointed as the Chief Executive of Womankind Worldwide in September 2012 but stepped down from the role after only ten months in June 2013.[7]

In December 2009, Ballard was appointed to the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority which supervises MPs' expenses.[8] She was one of four members of IPSA who announced in December 2012 that they would not seek reappointment.[9]'

1 minute ago, BLOOLOO said:

They are virtue signalling.  It is ingrained in them at school.  Feelings are topmost.

Reality is, they are the easiest to exploit.

Quite.And load up with debt so you can get your pension fund the other side of the trade.............

 

PS great to see you Bloo.Not seen you on HPC for sometime.

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They should make it target driven only, for the MDs and upper echelons of charities. If this person increased donations by, say, £200m (and £150m of that goes to charity directly) then I'd have no issue with that person taking a huge salary.

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I worked, not for a charity, but a non commercial organisation with weak oversight. One of the scams of the directors was awarding themselves pension bonusses,  and announcingthe big increases the company was having to make to fund the deficit they caused as if it were a benfit for the staff. They made me sick, altough weirdly, they were a nice buch of blokes. I expect mostcharities are stuffed with similar types.

 

Anecdote 2. Exgirl friend agonising about whether her next career move would be to join an investment bank, or as FD at a charity. Not compltely ridiculous, but kind of ironic. She went for the bank.

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51 minutes ago, Zanu Bob said:

That's even worse.Genuinely stunned.

Typically, when you set up the DD with a chugger, a bit more than the first year's donations pay for the chugger and their boss.  I find this abhorrent.

always ask for details so that I can look up the charity later and maybe donate then.  They never ever have details for this.  I take a picture of the pamphlet just to annoy them more.  If they push me, I look them in the eye and say 'I never, ever hand out money on a whim.'  I also always translate their 'only x a month' into yearly expenditure, or sometimes cost over a 5 year period (like I'm working out a pcp deal).  So when they say 'only £20 a month' I'll say 'but that's over £1000 over a 5 year period -- that's not only, that's loads'.

But I'll also say something like 'it is great that you're out here collecting like this'.  I like to think that for most they'd start to develop a crisis of conscience and get a proper job.

I'm  generally sympathetic to young people having to do unpleasant jobs because the employment market has been broken, but really chugging is a deception bordering on fraud, and they shouldn't do it.

I do know people who run chugging companies.  They're seriously loaded.  Really really.  

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21 minutes ago, dgul said:

I'm  generally sympathetic to young people having to do unpleasant jobs because the employment market has been broken, but really chugging is a deception bordering on fraud, and they shouldn't do it.

I do know people who run chugging companies.  They're seriously loaded.  Really really.  

x2 and I say that to their faces.It's sad,when I was a kid there were genuine apprenticeships

Chugging isn't really a job it's deception in an SJW stylee.

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