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steppensheep

Inconsistent temperature sensitivity

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If I'm naked and it's chilly in the house, the most important think to put on is a long sleeved t-shirt. Or if its wintry out, I can wear shorts no bother, but need something to keep body and arms warm.

Getting into the swimming pool, the trickiest bit is getting the tummy under the water surface. If cold showering, tummy is sensitive, but also the back.

In bed, essential that my legs are covered with the duvet, but torso can comfortably be exposed (although for actual sleeping, it is comforting to have the duvet around shoulders). But wearing bedsocks really makes feet overheat.

Questions of modesty aside. It's bothering me.

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I used to live in Hungary, which has very cold winters (down to -25 sometimes) and very hot summers (up to +40). 

Oddly enough I didn't find it too difficult to cope with, but a lot of Hungarians seemed to complain about it. 

I think it's because the Brits are used to sometimes having four seasons in one day!

Probably why we managed to conquer both India and Canada!

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1 hour ago, steppensheep said:

If I'm naked and it's chilly in the house, the most important think to put on is a long sleeved t-shirt. Or if its wintry out, I can wear shorts no bother, but need something to keep body and arms warm.

Getting into the swimming pool, the trickiest bit is getting the tummy under the water surface. If cold showering, tummy is sensitive, but also the back.

This is completely normal.

1 hour ago, steppensheep said:

In bed, essential that my legs are covered with the duvet, but torso can comfortably be exposed (although for actual sleeping, it is comforting to have the duvet around shoulders). But wearing bedsocks really makes feet overheat.

This is pretty weird. I know it's the new era and cross dressing is "completely cool yeah", but honestly, bedsocks are really only for women. 

1 hour ago, steppensheep said:

Questions of modesty aside. It's bothering me.

This is very weird. You maybe need a therapist.

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1 hour ago, steppensheep said:

If I'm naked and it's chilly in the house, the most important think to put on is a long sleeved t-shirt. Or if its wintry out, I can wear shorts no bother, but need something to keep body and arms warm.

Getting into the swimming pool, the trickiest bit is getting the tummy under the water surface. If cold showering, tummy is sensitive, but also the back.

In bed, essential that my legs are covered with the duvet, but torso can comfortably be exposed (although for actual sleeping, it is comforting to have the duvet around shoulders). But wearing bedsocks really makes feet overheat.

Questions of modesty aside. It's bothering me.

I'm exactly the same.

The legs are basically bone wrapped in muscle so unless you're incapacitated they generate plenty of their own heat and also don't contain any vital organs that need a specific temperature range as they are all in the groin to scalp range.

Pretty much everyone (in Britain) wears the same trousers winter and summer.

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37 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm exactly the same.

The legs are basically bone wrapped in muscle so unless you're incapacitated they generate plenty of their own heat and also don't contain any vital organs that need a specific temperature range as they are all in the groin to scalp range.

Pretty much everyone (in Britain) wears the same trousers winter and summer.

Oddly enough this is the first winter where I've actually started to feel cold in my legs. I now wear long-johns a lot, or have a blanket over my knees at my desk, like a victorian cripple in a bath-chair. 

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If you look at old photographs, lots of people seemed to wear lots of clothes.

Before central heating in houses, we all wore jackets or pullovers indoors, bedrooms could get really cold, especially as there were no fitted carpets, just a rug to put your feet on.

Most houses only had one coal fire which heated the living room and the hot water tank.

Consequently we are all designed to cope with cold weather and it is only really the last 45 years or so that we have become used to heated houses and offices.

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3 hours ago, Austin Allegro said:

I used to live in Hungary, which has very cold winters (down to -25 sometimes) and very hot summers (up to +40). 

Oddly enough I didn't find it too difficult to cope with, but a lot of Hungarians seemed to complain about it. 

I think it's because the Brits are used to sometimes having four seasons in one day!

Probably why we managed to conquer both India and Canada!

What did you think of living in Hungary? Its a country I've never visited but has some advantages that make it somewhere I'd consider moving to. 

On topic, if its cold I turn the heating up :P

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30 minutes ago, Byron said:

If you look at old photographs, lots of people seemed to wear lots of clothes.

Before central heating in houses, we all wore jackets or pullovers indoors, bedrooms could get really cold, especially as there were no fitted carpets, just a rug to put your feet on.

Most houses only had one coal fire which heated the living room and the hot water tank.

Consequently we are all designed to cope with cold weather and it is only really the last 45 years or so that we have become used to heated houses and offices.

It's hard to believe that up until the second world war, the standard clothing for most men was a three piece tweed or woollen suit, and long woolen underwear, pretty much all year round. 

Wear all that lot and you don't need central heating! 

 

 

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Just now, sleepwello'nights said:

What did you think of living in Hungary? Its a country I've never visited but has some advantages that make it somewhere I'd consider moving to. 

On topic, if its cold I turn the heating up :P

I liked it a lot. Friendly people, nice weather most of the year (except November-February, but even then it's cold and clear, not overcast like Britain), cheap cost of living, beautiful women, lots of culture. They also have a staunch pride in what you might call western Christian civilization, and have no truck with champagne socialism or trendy-lefties in general. 

Downsides are the national sense of despondency and gloom, Mr Orban's increasingly odd laws, old socialist bureaucracy and the incredibly hard to learn language. 

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11 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

I liked it a lot. Friendly people, nice weather most of the year (except November-February, but even then it's cold and clear, not overcast like Britain), cheap cost of living, beautiful women, lots of culture. They also have a staunch pride in what you might call western Christian civilization, and have no truck with champagne socialism or trendy-lefties in general. 

Downsides are the national sense of despondency and gloom, Mr Orban's increasingly odd laws, old socialist bureaucracy and the incredibly hard to learn language. 

Köszönöm

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2 hours ago, Austin Allegro said:

It's hard to believe that up until the second world war, the standard clothing for most men was a three piece tweed or woollen suit, and long woolen underwear, pretty much all year round. 

Wear all that lot and you don't need central heating! 

 

 

My parents first installed partial central heating in 1962, by then I had left home and was living in houses heated by a coal fire.

My wife used a tin bath in front of the living room fire until 1970 when we got married.

We never felt particularly cold because we wore plenty of clothes.

It was women that caused the rot. I worked in those days in a Bank. In winter the women were constantly moaning about feeling cold because they simply would not wear sufficient clothing. By 1968, offices  were like ovens in winter and men just had to adapt.

Just look at the photos of the Aberfan disaster. This was 1966, October and November, the men are wearing plenty of underclothing, the Police, Ambulance, Fire Brigade, St. Johns Ambulance, Red Cross etc. are all in winter uniforms.

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But, don't get me wrong, I reckon that central heating saved lives.

I remember in 1968 going to visit an old Scotsman, friend of a friend so to speak. It was winter and he was living in an old stone house which was simply not adequately heated by modern standards, of course we did not know any better then, but sure enough, as winter came on he slowly succumbed to respiratory problems and was gone by January.

My own chest was pretty ropey in those days.

The coming of central heating dried peoples bronchial problems up.

People used to complain about the dryness of central heating then and you could buy little plastic water containers to hang on your radiators.

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15 hours ago, Austin Allegro said:

It's hard to believe that up until the second world war, the standard clothing for most men was a three piece tweed or woollen suit, and long woolen underwear, pretty much all year round. 

Wear all that lot and you don't need central heating! 

 

 

I think it also has got warmer (not the global warming lobby type warmer but the steady recovery from having Frost Fairs on the Thames) and we just don't get many of those relentlessly cold spells every winter any more.

I have never had to wear even lined trousers, let alone long johns, and a vest is a distant memory.

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I do find sitting at my desk, at home, my feet get cold whilst the rest of me is comfortably warm. The noise from a fan heater annoys me so was considering one of those old lady electric plug in feet warmers. The problem with feet is if you wear thicker socks in footwear it has no effect as it just forces out the better insulating air.

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1 hour ago, SNACR said:

I do find sitting at my desk, at home, my feet get cold whilst the rest of me is comfortably warm. The noise from a fan heater annoys me so was considering one of those old lady electric plug in feet warmers. The problem with feet is if you wear thicker socks in footwear it has no effect as it just forces out the better insulating air.

Two pairs of socks?

On long walks I wear undersocks (tight cycling socks that don't move) and thicker oversocks that can move and provide cushioning.

The aim is to prevent blisters but the side-effect is that in summer my feet are boiling; but it's better than blisters.

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5 hours ago, SNACR said:

I do find sitting at my desk, at home, my feet get cold whilst the rest of me is comfortably warm. The noise from a fan heater annoys me so was considering one of those old lady electric plug in feet warmers. The problem with feet is if you wear thicker socks in footwear it has no effect as it just forces out the better insulating air.

These are great for keeping your feet warm indoors (they're way too thick to wear with shoes):

https://heatholders.co.uk/mens-clothing/socks

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On 17/11/2017 at 11:52, steppensheep said:

If I'm naked and it's chilly in the house, the most important think to put on is a long sleeved t-shirt. Or if its wintry out, I can wear shorts no bother, but need something to keep body and arms warm.

Getting into the swimming pool, the trickiest bit is getting the tummy under the water surface. If cold showering, tummy is sensitive, but also the back.

In bed, essential that my legs are covered with the duvet, but torso can comfortably be exposed (although for actual sleeping, it is comforting to have the duvet around shoulders). But wearing bedsocks really makes feet overheat.

Questions of modesty aside. It's bothering me.

So, to summarise: when you're using your legs, they are warmer than the rest of you; and when you're not, they're colder?

If so, I think it just shows you have an active physiology, and you're getting a lot of your warmth from activity, rather than basal metabolic rate. Without knowing any medicine, that sounds like a good thing.

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One thing that does annoy me about modern offices is that in winter people expect them to be heated to a level where they don't need to wear a jumper. FFS! Even if you don't care about global warming it's a waste of energy!!

Women do seem inconsiderate when it comes to office temperature....

I heat my flat to 15 degrees and just wear an extra jumper and use a blanket...

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1 minute ago, Great Guy said:

One thing that does annoy me about modern offices is that in winter people expect them to be heated to a level where they don't need to wear a jumper. FFS! Even if you don't care about global warming it's a waste of energy!!

Women do seem inconsiderate when it comes to office temperature....

I heat my flat to 15 degrees and just wear an extra jumper and use a blanket...

This has been studied; the simple conclusion is that women are in general smaller than men so have higher surface area / mass ratios and lose heat more quickly.  Hence they prefer the temperature to be slightly warmer.

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