• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Sign in to follow this  
The Masked Tulip

ARA San Juan - Argentina loses a sub

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

Santa Cruz class - 2 built for Argentina in the 1980's by the Germans.

Not the Argentine one, the one in the video Frank posted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

They have found the sub in 70 metres of water. Rescue attempts are now underway.

Poor bastards, being trapped in a metal tube in deep water with the air running is the stuff of nightmares 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Malthus said:

Poor bastards, being trapped in a metal tube in deep water with the air running is the stuff of nightmares 

Yep, the Americans are involved so no doubt there is the option of their rescue vehicle but that is a long, long flight from Norfolk in the US to Patagonia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Malthus said:

Poor bastards, being trapped in a metal tube in deep water with the air running is the stuff of nightmares 

I've been on a couple of submarines at naval museums, the sense of claustrophobia on them even when they are above water is bad enough, I can't (and don't want to) imagine the horror or being trapped on one underwater. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Dipsy said:

I've been on a couple of submarines at naval museums, the sense of claustrophobia on them even when they are above water is bad enough, I can't (and don't want to) imagine the horror or being trapped on one underwater. 

a mate's brother joined the submarine branch and told it was common for newbies to go to sleep and dream of being trapped in a coffin - fck that for a game of soldiers

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/3606461/Coffin-dreams-600-ft-under.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Dipsy said:

I can't watch Das Boot.

Uncut version is on this weekend on one of the channels, got it set to record to relive avidly watching it in the 1980s when I was a kid, can see them now popping the valve lifters on the big diesels when they start them up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Knock Out Johnny said:

a mate's brother joined the submarine branch and told it was common for newbies to go to sleep and dream of being trapped in a coffin - fck that for a game of soldiers

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/3606461/Coffin-dreams-600-ft-under.html

I've known archaeologists have to leave digs because when they're excavating an inhumation burial they suddenly see themselves as the body and flip. Not common but it does happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, eight said:

Eh? It's no that bad. You're thinking of U571.

I'm not risking it, I'm a bit claustrophobic. It's one of Mr Dipsy's favourites so I have seen snippets of it over the years - I find the end very moving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hunt for Red October always made a life on submarines seem very exciting. Imagine it was very much an oversell and you don't get to yell 'right full rudder' nearly as much in real life.

An emergency surface or surfacing through the polar ice pack would probably still be the shizz.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, SNACR said:

Hunt for Red October always made a life on submarines seem very exciting. Imagine it was very much an oversell and you don't get to yell 'right full rudder' nearly as much in real life.

An emergency surface or surfacing through the polar ice pack would probably still be the shizz.

In the wake of the use of subs in the Falklands I was keen to join up as they were such an effective weapon; it seemed the coolest part of the armed forces.  I had a school friend join up and he was in the secret communications team of ?three ?two who weren't allowed to fraternise with the rest of the crew and had their own separate quarters and meals.  So for six months his only human contact was saying hello to the bloke with whom he was chnaging shifts.

He also said that amazingly they were allowed to smoke and the air was foul; you can see some compensation claims being lined up.  This was the late 80s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

In the wake of the use of subs in the Falklands I was keen to join up as they were such an effective weapon; it seemed the coolest part of the armed forces.  I had a school friend join up and he was in the secret communications team of ?three ?two who weren't allowed to fraternise with the rest of the crew and had their own separate quarters and meals.  So for six months his only human contact was saying hello to the bloke with whom he was chnaging shifts.

He also said that amazingly they were allowed to smoke and the air was foul; you can see some compensation claims being lined up.  This was the late 80s.

 

Anyone who wishes to join the submarine fleet really needs to read up some stories from people who have served - will put you off. How on earth any woman wishes to go, ahem, down with the sub fleet is beyond me. The subs are better today - bigger, smoking bans - but all the same you need a certain mindset to be able to do that job.

Therei s a female sailor aboard this Argie sub. I hope that the entire crew is alive and are soon saved. Big search area though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By sancho panza
      A decade after the last EM crisis,it looks we're about to have another.The humble Greenback takes centre stage.
      The last sentence below is the one that worries most for the UK and Sterling holders.
      My thanks obviously to Wolf as I've lifted all the links from the last 7 days of his work.Great site.
       
      Mexico launches the 2000 Peso note
      https://wolfstreet.com/2018/09/02/mexicos-central-bank-just-broke-with-the-war-on-cash/
      'which begs the question: why the sudden need for an even higher denomination note? The most likely answer? To keep up with inflation.
      In the last 10 years the Mexican currency has lost much of its value despite the fact that inflation during that time has been relatively tame by Mexican standards! The accumulated inflation rate of the last 10 years of so-called “moderate” inflation is 51%. The result has been a 34% fall in purchasing power.'
       
      Spainish banks exposure to South American and Turkish debt crisis
      https://wolfstreet.com/2018/08/31/turkey-argentina-brazil-other-emerging-markets-haunt-spanish-banks/
      'In the case of Turkey’s financial system, Spanish banks had total exposure of $82.3 billion in the first quarter of 2018, according to the Bank for International Settlements. That’s more than the combined exposure of lenders from the next three most exposed economies, France, the USA, and the UK, which reached $75 billion in the same period.
      According to BIS statistics, Spanish banks’ exposure to Turkey’s economy almost quadrupled between 2015 and 2018, largely on the back of Spain’s second largest bank BBVA’s madcap purchase of roughly half of Turkey’s third largest lender, Turkiye Garanti Bankasi. Since buying its first chunk of the bank from the Turkish group Dogus and General Electric in 2010, BBVA has lost over 75% of its investment under the combined influence of Garanti’s plummeting shares and Turkey’s plunging currency.
      But the biggest fear, as expressed by the ECB on August 10, is that Turkish borrowers might not be hedged against the lira’s weakness and begin to default en masse on foreign currency loans, which account for a staggering 40% of the Turkish banking sector’s assets.
      In Brazil Spanish banks have total exposure to the economy of $167 billion, according to BIS data. That’s the equivalent of 44.6% of total foreign banking investments in the country. For Banco Santander, Brazil is by far its biggest market, accounting for 26% of its global operating profits, compared to just 16% for Spain.
      Meanwhile, in Mexico Spanish banks have over $160 billion invested, which represents 42% of total foreign banking exposure. Once again, it’s BBVA that is doing the heavy lifting, through its subsidiary BBVA Bancomer, the largest bank in Mexico. It provided 45% of BBVA’s group profits in the first half of 2018.
      This pattern of exposure to emerging-market risk is replicated across most Latin American economies. In Chile Spanish banks account for 43% of total foreign bank-owned debt; in Colombia, it’s 32% and in Peru, it’s 40%.'
       
      Turkey’s Debt & Currency Crisis Morphs into Financial Crisis as Banks Face Funding Squeeze
      https://wolfstreet.com/2018/08/30/turkey-debt-currency-crisis-lira-crash-dollar-debt-banks-financial-crisis/
      The more the lira falls against major foreign currencies such as the dollar and the euro, the more difficulties the banks will have funding their operations. According to Moody’s, a serious funding crisis could come sooner rather than later, given that in the next 12 months around $77 billion of foreign currency wholesale bonds and syndicated loans — equivalent to 41% of the total market funding — needs to be refinanced.
      Over the past four months, the lira has plunged 40%.
       
      Global bondholders are understandably concerned about this trend, especially given that it coincides, and is partly the result of, rising U.S. rates and a firming U.S dollar. These bondholders’ predictable response is to beg the IMF to step in and impose some semblance of order on Turkey’s economy, whose currency crisis has already turned into a debt crisis that is now dragging some rather large European banks through the mire.
      What global bondholders ultimately want is for the IMF to lend Turkey money to bail out Turkey’s bondholders so as to put an end to the turmoil and torture in emerging markets bonds, which were selling like hotcakes just eight months ago. There’s one big problem with the plan, however: for the IMF to intervene in a country’s economy, it must first be invited to do so by that country’s respective government — and it usually attaches some unpalatable strings.
       
      https://wolfstreet.com/2018/08/30/argentina-peso-collapses-20-in-2-days-as-government-asks-for-faster-imf-bailout/
      Yesterday the peso plunged 7%; and today as of midday in Buenos Aires, it has plunged over 17%. That brings the total plunge for the two days to 24%. It now takes 41.3 pesos to buy a dollar. Seen the other way around, a peso is now worth 2.4 cents (down from $1 in early 2002):
      WTF happened? As soon as those IMF dollars started flowing a couple of months ago, the government – the central bank is under the Ministry of Finance and thus integral part of the government – started selling those dollars and buying pesos. But it was the only entity buying pesos, and those dollars were handed to the pesos sellers and thus wasted instead of being invested in the economy.
      This is what a currency-and-debt crisis looks like: Argentina has $120 billion in dollar-denominated debt, a chunk of which comes due next year and needs to be paid off, and in order to pay off this debt, Argentina needs to be able to borrow more dollars. This was no problem last year, when it was even able to issue 100-year dollar bonds, but sheer insanity has left the building, and investors have opened their eyes.
      This goes back to my old dictum: No one should ever lend dollars to Argentina, not even the IMF. This always ends the same way: in a default.
      The thing is, a collapsing peso makes imports more expensive in peso terms, which pushes up inflation, which in turn helps crush the peso…. You get the idea.'
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.