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Kurt Barlow

30GW windfarn on Dogger bank

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18 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

For the part in Bold, boats in SW Ireland, including Donegal, Wales and Scotland. SW England (cornwall) have been a bit slow on the uptake.

There was a viable UK sportfishery at the turn of the 20th Century, hence the creation of the Bluefin Tunny Club.

Commercial fishing (>10m) has decimated fish over the last 200 years.

I'm not a fisherman, but I'm fortunate to catch enough seafood to eat it every day.

They were never slow on the up take ,it`s just not viable and never have been in my lifetime 

To fish at those distances ,(On the main you have to hit the gulf stream to have much of a chance )  you will be very lucky to get 100 days at sea a year with a angling boat yet alone a tuna season   

The boats that have landed fish are boats doing shark fishing trips ,tuna has always been more of an accident up to the last few years when they Had ago when they seen them  which  has never been a daily or even weekly occurrence (you need very calm days  to make seeing them possible)

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1 hour ago, Long time lurking said:

Mackerel moving northwards how far ? i have caught them in the north of Scotland in the 80`s (they have always been there) ,the UK`s largest commercial pelagic boats are based in Scotladnd and where the mackerel are the tuna are never far away

Numbers maybe increasing but there decline was never due to angling and will never be ,ROI realised a long time ago that Bass anglers were far greater value to there economy than the commercial boys so they banned all netting and commercial line caught (it was still to late) (the US came to the same conclusion with stripped bass years ago)  ..angling has never been the problem it`s not in the interest of the sport

One of the major wintering spots for Mackerel is off North West Scotland. The other is off Cornwall.

Mackerel are predominantly spring - summer visitors to the North Sea. I used to catch them by the boat load from Yacht off Well  next the Sea from Mid July towards the end of August with nothing after the Bank Holiday.

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28 minutes ago, Long time lurking said:

They were never slow on the up take ,it`s just not viable and never have been in my lifetime 

To fish at those distances ,(On the main you have to hit the gulf stream to have much of a chance )  you will be very lucky to get 100 days at sea a year with a angling boat yet alone a tuna season   

The boats that have landed fish are boats doing shark fishing trips ,tuna has always been more of an accident up to the last few years when they Had ago when they seen them  which  has never been a daily or even weekly occurrence (you need very calm days  to make seeing them possible)

Yes, there wouldn't be an income to be had solely from Tuna at the moment. I don't think i said that there would. And there may never be a return of Tuna to the numbers seen in the N Sea at the beginning of the 20th century as the abundance in the Atlantic has been decimated since then. So there may never be a sportfishery for tuna again in our waters where boats could earn a living from just that species. But in 20 years time,  I would not be surprised to see fishing trips for Atlantic tuna in our waters. Today, is premature however. As I said, I've had decent numbers of Atlantic bluefin tuna within 0.5 nmi of the coast regularly in September through to December; this in the last 3 years. I had many around me that distance from shore over anchovy the week before Xmas with the sea temp still at 11C. So given what people would pay to catch one, a charter skipper, such as a sharking boat, could do very nicely at the end of the season, even with a day a week at sea. Of course, your business wouldn't be just Atlantic tuna, but, as the season closes, it would be a welcome and profitable boost.

Given that the UK has no quota for Atlantic bluefin tuna, so there is no commercial market, it is pointless to target them for sport, and a single tuna will be more than a fisherman could eat. Atlantic bluefin tuna are not physiologically suited to a prolonged fight and so many that are caught and released 'alive' will die, and what is the point of that when it's an IUCN red list species, where is the conservation in that?

Edited by Hopeful

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21 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

Didn't notice any dolphins in ASDA today - but I did see plenty of whales.

Most of them driving round in them electric scooters that help them grow to full maturity...

 

XYY

If you're cacomorphobic in any way never go to an American games convention, it's grotesque.

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4 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

One of the major wintering spots for Mackerel is off North West Scotland. The other is off Cornwall.

Mackerel are predominantly spring - summer visitors to the North Sea. I used to catch them by the boat load from Yacht off Well  next the Sea from Mid July towards the end of August with nothing after the Bank Holiday.

That's as you know it. The distribution is moving northwards fast

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2 hours ago, Kurt Barlow said:

The hub proposal is to link this to Norway. Norway are currently converting some of their Hydro to pump storage as they see themselves as Europes 'Battery' post oil and gas era.

And the UK needs to get its act together and do the same. The rush to decarbonise the power market is all well and good, but the intermittent nature of renuwables means grid instability and a huge struggle to balance the supply/demand without conventional base load and spinning reserve from thermal & Hydro. Pump storage takes decades to develop as you need to thoroughly check that you are not inconveniencing any tadpoles etc, so to prevent future brown outs when there’s a high pressure cold snap (no wind) you’d need to be cloning Dynorwic asap.

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4 hours ago, Kurt Barlow said:

I used to have some dealings with Eastern Seas fisheries and their marine science bods reckoned large scale wind farm developments would help the uk inshore fleet because the areas themselves act as reserves for fish to breed. Secondly the plethora of farms and cables make the big Euro klondiker trawlers unviable in our waters.

Less the trawlers, more the Dsnish vacuum boats sucking up sandeels for pig feed.

Entire bottom of sea food pyramid hoovered up for cheap, fishy bacon.

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2 hours ago, Kurt Barlow said:

One of the major wintering spots for Mackerel is off North West Scotland. The other is off Cornwall.

Mackerel are predominantly spring - summer visitors to the North Sea. I used to catch them by the boat load from Yacht off Well  next the Sea from Mid July towards the end of August with nothing after the Bank Holiday.

If your lucky you get to see a mad chain of species eating each other. Minkes a mile out then sprats sandeels being chased by mackrell, which are bring chased by dolphins and seals.

 

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2 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Less the trawlers, more the Dsnish vacuum boats sucking up sandeels for pig feed.

Entire bottom of sea food pyramid hoovered up for cheap, fishy bacon.

Thabk you - I thought I was going mad thinking that my bacon was smelling a bit fishy lately.

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1 minute ago, This Time said:

Thabk you - I thought I was going mad thinking that my bacon was smelling a bit fishy lately.

Theyve been doing it for years.

Sandeels are ' free' - unlike soymeal.

Gormless as sandeels underpin the north sea food chain.

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18 hours ago, FudgePacker said:

If you're cacomorphobic in any way never go to an American games convention, it's grotesque.

I can imagine so Fudgy. Those Yanks like to "go large" with everything.

A particularly huge colleague at work had to have his anti-static overalls ordered specially at some expense to the company. A few years later, he was sent to our sister plant in Illinois to assist them with some problem they were having, and packed his overalls thinking he'd have the same problem over there.

When he got there, after his site-induction, he was lead into a room with racks of overalls and told to pick himself a set, and that they were arranged from the smallest to largest from left to right along the rail.

He found his size about two-thirds of the way down...

 

 

XYY

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