• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Sign in to follow this  
sarahbell

Plastic. It's over

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, sarahbell said:

Britain has been shipping up to 500,000 tonnes of plastic for recycling in China every year, but now the trade has been stopped.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-42455378

 

 

Burn it waste to energy power stations (we already do this with recycled plastic rejected from recycling). 500.000 tonnes of plastic is almost a million tonnes of coal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

Burn it waste to energy power stations (we already do this with recycled plastic rejected from recycling). 500.000 tonnes of plastic is almost a million tonnes of coal.

feed it to bacteria. surely a bit of GM could come up with a bacterial that could convert it to something useful.

wonder why bacteria haven't started eating it naturally. must be a great food source. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

Britain has been shipping up to 500,000 tonnes of plastic for recycling in China every year, but now the trade has been stopped.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-42455378

 

 

Couple years back heard on R4 from a expert on the shipping industry that for every 4 containers of crap we import from China we only send 1 back, which is full of scrap metal and plastic. Nuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We could recycle it and use it in British factories..

Oh!!!  Forget about that last bit.

Anyway there is no problem that politicians and bureaucrats won't invent a tax to fix so expect a plastic tax soon. And indeed the government mentions one is being considered in that BBC article.

 

Edited by Virgil Caine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Kurt Barlow said:

Burn it waste to energy power stations (we already do this with recycled plastic rejected from recycling). 500.000 tonnes of plastic is almost a million tonnes of coal.

That`s the only option ...tree huggers will be crying in there milk though 

Mind you the boiler tubes don `t like the stuff ..go long on inconel coated pipe 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand that there are complications with burning it (need higher temps to break down nasties, etc).

But I dislike the constant 'burning would be a waste of this high carbon resource' -- it makes much more sense to burn the oil that's been used once (or more) as plastic, than to burn neat oil.

Anyway, I think we should parcel it all up then send to strategic stockpiles around the country*.  Then, in hundreds of years time when there's no oil we can mine this valuable resource and export it.

[* not round here, obviously.  Perhaps Scotland or Cornwall.]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

We could recycle it and use it in British factories..

Oh!!!  Forget about that last bit.

Anyway there is no problem that politicians and bureaucrats won't invent a tax to fix so expect a plastic tax soon. And indeed the government mentions one is being considered in that BBC article.

 

It would be great to have a plastic tax; anything that reduces the amount of cheap consumer tat for which people seem to have an inexhaustible appetite is a plus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it was divided up proportionally between the country's top fifty retailers and dumped daily outside their corporate headquarters until they could prove categorically that none of it came from them I bet the problem would go away overnight. It really fucking annoys me how most consumer stuff is packed in plastic when paper or cardboard would do just as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It would be great to have a plastic tax; anything that reduces the amount of cheap consumer tat for which people seem to have an inexhaustible appetite is a plus.

It might also prompt people to think that a local industrial cycle might be better than a global one. While our politicians and planners clearly can not think further ahead than the average gold fish it is worth noting that much of this plastic originates in China so they potentially are going to take a hit if a plastic tax makes their imports more expensive 

Edited by Virgil Caine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, One percent said:

Why not just go back to glass containers?  The ultimate in recycling. 

Idiots. 

People sell my Granddad's old bottles on ebay.  I feel like writing to them saying that they belong to me (and that they can have the 0.5p per bottle returned).

That's the trouble with glass -- it's nice so people nick it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a bit rich China saying buy our tat but we don't want it back in any shape or form.  A very one sided form of globalisation.  Buying the tat should be on condition of them taking back at least an equivalent amount of waste.

How about using the waste as bulk to build some large islands off the north coast of Africa etc to use as neutral status safe holding stations for illegal immigrants. 

Those for instance saved by NGOs in their illegal people smuggling operations - until the "refugees" legal status can be established and their destination decided.  

 

Edited by twocents

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, dgul said:

People sell my Granddad's old bottles on ebay.  I feel like writing to them saying that they belong to me (and that they can have the 0.5p per bottle returned).

That's the trouble with glass -- it's nice so people nick it.

You just need to make the deposit worthwhile and market it.

£1 for a lifetime recyclable milk bottle and you money back if you don't need one any more?.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Poseidon said:

feed it to bacteria. surely a bit of GM could come up with a bacterial that could convert it to something useful.

wonder why bacteria haven't started eating it naturally. must be a great food source. 

Errr - i think thats the problem - nothing does eat it hence the issue of plastics in the ocean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, dgul said:

Dropping it in the Pacific?

 

10 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

Probably. Looking at that beach in Bali

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/42511483

 

Yes, they are.  Councils bully us to "recycle and save the planet".  It gets shipped halfway around the world to China who then discreetly dumps it into the sea.
 

Quote

 

In a recent report, Ocean Conservancy claims that China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam are spewing out as much as 60 percent of the plastic waste that enters the world’s seas.

In the five Asian countries listed above, only about 40 percent of garbage is properly collected. Across Asia, trash is often piled up in communal dumps where stray bits are swept up by the wind and cast into the ocean.

Even sanctioned garbage dump sites are sometimes intentionally set up near rivers that flow into the sea. The reason, according to Ocean Conservancy: “Waste will intermittently be carried away by heavy rains or current, refreshing the capacity of the dump to receive more waste.”

 

https://www.pri.org/stories/2016-01-13/5-countries-dump-more-plastic-oceans-rest-world-combined

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.