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longtomsilver

Private Health Insurance

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It’s apparent that the NHS is creaking, busily offering all and sundry around the globe expensive medical intervention. I’m really not that fussed with my own personal arrangement but it’s important that MrsLTS stays in good health as she pays the bills.

an online quote from Bupa to cover all care including cancer and outpatient treatment (essential hospitals, £500 excess) costs only £58 a month. 

What’s the catch? Has anyone got personal experiences here. We could just go through her employers provider but that’s a taxable perk and the net benefit is marginal. 

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9 minutes ago, longtomsilver said:

It’s apparent that the NHS is creaking, busily offering all and sundry around the globe expensive medical intervention. I’m really not that fussed with my own personal arrangement but it’s important that MrsLTS stays in good health as she pays the bills.

an online quote from Bupa to cover all care including cancer and outpatient treatment (essential hospitals, £500 excess) costs only £58 a month. 

What’s the catch? Has anyone got personal experiences here. We could just go through her employers provider but that’s a taxable perk and the net benefit is marginal. 

Is that an actual quote, or just a figure on their website somewhere. 

It will change massively depending on age and existing conditions (they won't be covered anyway). 

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8 minutes ago, longtomsilver said:

It’s apparent that the NHS is creaking, busily offering all and sundry around the globe expensive medical intervention. I’m really not that fussed with my own personal arrangement but it’s important that MrsLTS stays in good health as she pays the bills.

an online quote from Bupa to cover all care including cancer and outpatient treatment (essential hospitals, £500 excess) costs only £58 a month. 

What’s the catch? Has anyone got personal experiences here. We could just go through her employers provider but that’s a taxable perk and the net benefit is marginal. 

This may be a one-off but I've heard of cases where in a real emergency surgery situation a patient was transferred from the BUPA hospital to an NHS hospital close by where a more experienced surgeon saved the person. She had a nice bright clean room in the BUPA place though. I'd guess it's probably worth it overall as serious emergencies are rare.

 

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9 minutes ago, longtomsilver said:

It’s apparent that the NHS is creaking, busily offering all and sundry around the globe expensive medical intervention. I’m really not that fussed with my own personal arrangement but it’s important that MrsLTS stays in good health as she pays the bills.

an online quote from Bupa to cover all care including cancer and outpatient treatment (essential hospitals, £500 excess) costs only £58 a month. 

What’s the catch? Has anyone got personal experiences here. We could just go through her employers provider but that’s a taxable perk and the net benefit is marginal. 

No real catch but it won’t cover anything existing and it will only kick in after a GP referral. Given what you’ve said about mrs LTS in the past, I’d go with taking out life insurance on her and leave her health to the NHS!

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10 minutes ago, longtomsilver said:

It’s apparent that the NHS is creaking, busily offering all and sundry around the globe expensive medical intervention. I’m really not that fussed with my own personal arrangement but it’s important that MrsLTS stays in good health as she pays the bills.

an online quote from Bupa to cover all care including cancer and outpatient treatment (essential hospitals, £500 excess) costs only £58 a month. 

What’s the catch? Has anyone got personal experiences here. We could just go through her employers provider but that’s a taxable perk and the net benefit is marginal. 

I can tell you that my father took out private health insurance when he was about 50.

Three months later and he was diagnosed with throat cancer. He had 5 years of very expensive private treatment which was exceptionally good.

I have had it for a few years but thankfully never needed it. For me it is always about timing - if I need something fixing, it is imperative that I choose when it is fixed.

I have also seen the public and private cancer wards. I know where I would like to be,

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Just now, swissy_fit said:

This may be a one-off but I've heard of cases where in a real emergency surgery situation a patient was transferred from the BUPA hospital to an NHS hospital close by where a more experienced surgeon saved the person. She had a nice bright clean room in the BUPA place though. I'd guess it's probably worth it overall as serious emergencies are rare.

 

Yes, never have anything complex done in a private hospital ever. Best bet is to use the private wards at a big NHS teaching hospital- nice clean private room, no long waiting lists and proper emergency care for backup.

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2 minutes ago, swissy_fit said:

This may be a one-off but I've heard of cases where in a real emergency surgery situation a patient was transferred from the BUPA hospital to an NHS hospital close by where a more experienced surgeon saved the person. She had a nice bright clean room in the BUPA place though. I'd guess it's probably worth it overall as serious emergencies are rare.

That is true to an extent The one time I have been hospitalised, I said that I had insurance and could I go to the private wing. (hey were short on beds and had bunged me in the geriatric ward with no access to the outside world)

They said that I needed to be within three minutes of crash and that the private wing couldn't provide that.

But I doubt it about the surgeon. You tend to get the same ones no matter which way you go.

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8 minutes ago, gilf said:

Is that an actual quote, or just a figure on their website somewhere. 

It will change massively depending on age and existing conditions (they won't be covered anyway). 

It’s the on-line quote and takes me straight through to the direct debit set-up. No pre-existing conditions but a diet predominantly based on haribo.

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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, TheBlueCat said:

No real catch but it won’t cover anything existing and it will only kick in after a GP referral. Given what you’ve said about mrs LTS in the past, I’d go with taking out life insurance on her and leave her health to the NHS!

Ha! that’s next on my to do list. Her employer offers a multiple of salary as part of the pension package that is worth £350k so I shouldn’t be too greedy.

Edited by longtomsilver

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1 minute ago, longtomsilver said:

It’s the on-line quote and takes me straight through to the direct debit set-up. No pre-existing conditions but a diet predominantly based on haribo.

Doesn't sound too far off to me - it will probably come with a large excess (£500) which is OK

But you need to check out if it has annual limits and also the hospital band it covers. In London / SE you will need much higher levels or you will find your choice of Hospital severely limited.

If she is mainly fit and well you may get a better deal with one that asks a lot of questions / has a medical.

The no questions asked ones are typically for people that already know they are high risk.

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Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

I can tell you that my father took out private health insurance when he was about 50.

Three months later and he was diagnosed with throat cancer. He had 5 years of very expensive private treatment which was exceptionally good.

I have had it for a few years but thankfully never needed it. For me it is always about timing - if I need something fixing, it is imperative that I choose when it is fixed.

I have also seen the public and private cancer wards. I know where I would like to be,

Thank you for your very personal and detailed reply, it’s the positive opinion that matters most. 

Further to your second post. It’s essential hospitals only (213) that cover the midlands. 

Edited by longtomsilver

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5 minutes ago, longtomsilver said:

Thank you for your very personal and detailed reply, it’s the positive opinion that matters most. 

Further to your second post. It’s essential hospitals only (213) that cover the midlands. 

My dad was quite proud of it. He hated large organisations (his ambition was to die owing Barclays bank £1m- he failed on that)

But he did take BUPA for probably £300/£400k which he found a good way to keep his spirits up.

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6 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

My dad was quite proud of it. He hated large organisations (his ambition was to die owing Barclays bank £1m- he failed on that)

But he did take BUPA for probably £300/£400k which he found a good way to keep his spirits up.

A man after my own heart - I’d like to go check out with an unpaid bar tab. 

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Maybe just stick that money in a savings account and use it as pay as you go for anything you would rather get done privately ? 

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If you're a statistics person then the best average bet is following the advice of @ccc. In a previous career I knew people at a big Australian insurer and that was their policy for staff.  The company covered them and would pay any bills as they arose; they found this was much cheaper than paying third party health premiums.  This would of course be people of working age.

Also IIRC the health premiums are very reasonable in middle age, when you're unlikely to claim, but start shooting up as you go into your 60s.

Based upon the recent experience of a family member, especially the after care, I would pay to go private if necessary but won't be bothering with health insurance.  Though I won't set up a segregated account.

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Just now, Frank Hovis said:

If you're a statistics person then the best average bet is following the advice of @ccc. In a previous career I knew people at a big Australian insurer and that was their policy for staff.  The company covered them and would pay any bills as they arose; they found this was much cheaper than paying third party health premiums.  This would of course be people of working age.

Also IIRC the health premiums are very reasonable in middle age, when you're unlikely to claim, but start shooting up as you go into your 60s.

Based upon the recent experience of a family member, especially the after care, I would pay to go private if necessary but won't be bothering with health insurance.  Though I won't set up a segregated account.

I've had to have private health insurance in three countries now.  I think the above is true - is you are relatively fit, and not too old, it is a waste of money in probability terms.  But if you need it, you really need it.  My view is that if we did not HAVE to have it (its often a condition of a visa), I would not, and if I got something really nasty I'd just kill myself.  Tricky with kids though - if they got one of the nasty cancers, the insurance could be priceless, especially as you are not allowed to suicide other people.

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I have Bupa through my employer, covers me and Dipsy junior. I had a lot of physiotherapy and an MRI via it, very good for non life threatening conditions when you just wanted to be treated at your convenience not the NHS's. 

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

If you're a statistics person then the best average bet is following the advice of @ccc. In a previous career I knew people at a big Australian insurer and that was their policy for staff.  The company covered them and would pay any bills as they arose; they found this was much cheaper than paying third party health premiums.  This would of course be people of working age.

Also IIRC the health premiums are very reasonable in middle age, when you're unlikely to claim, but start shooting up as you go into your 60s.

Based upon the recent experience of a family member, especially the after care, I would pay to go private if necessary but won't be bothering with health insurance.  Though I won't set up a segregated account.

That's all very well but they are aggregating a whole lot of people together.

Which is just another word for insurance.

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Posted (edited)

There is a third way, which is to self-insure.

When there's a need, just ask the consultant how much to get it done privately.  It'll probably be done by the same person in the same place, but with nicer coffee and in a fraction of the wait. 

Obviously there'll be plenty of 'big problems' that won't be readily affordable, but many problems would be.  

[the few really wealthy people I know self-insure.  I guess they'll just pay up what it'll take.   They often have private GPs though.]

Edited by dgul

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It's odd. Labour hate private health insurance yet the whole idea is that everyone pays in to cover the unfortunate few that may need to use it.

In reality it is proper socialism.

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Posted (edited)

In totality of service and scope it's not as good as the NHS - and that's not a particular endorsement of the NHS.  

When treated for a condition privately you do tend to get quicker service, better accommodation, more attentive nurses and medical staff and better meals etc but you have to be very wary of the exclusions and the length of cover of your treatment.  You also have to go through the paperwork to get your treatment approved.

On the whole I would stick to the NHS despite all its inadequacies.   Maybe with private as a back up if you can afford it - although they used to say if you had private insurance that might count against you in the NHS - I'm not sure that's the case today.

On the whole private doesn't really impress.

Overseas might be a different matter.

Edited by twocents

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17 hours ago, Cunning Plan said:

My dad was quite proud of it. He hated large organisations (his ambition was to die owing Barclays bank £1m- he failed on that)

But he did take BUPA for probably £300/£400k which he found a good way to keep his spirits up.

i fking love it

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The Nhs and Bupa share doctors and premises a lot. I'd sooner put away 50 quid a month in a savings account and fuck off overseas to an American / German / Polish hospital where the care, conditions and survival rates are vastly better. 

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