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sarahbell

sheltered homes needed?

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theres tens of thousands of empty rooms in house we are paying for via houseing benifits,id make em take a lodger in.ive got a lodger i dont do it because i need to i do it because its free cash.ive known him many years and i saw how he was treated when he came out of the fostering and adoption system.in many ways i surpose i treat him has one of my own kids.i even got him a job working with me.

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8 hours ago, sarahbell said:

if over half homeless people can't cope with every day life then they need help with that

Everyday life is massively complicated if you stop and analyse what you do on a daily, weekly, monthly basis.  That so many people cope reasonably well with it all is impressive but I'm not surprised that a lot don't.

To pick up a theme that runs on here a lot, cars, just think how many tasks and skills contribute to your driving to work (or allotment!) this morning.  All the things you have to put in place to be able to do that, starting many years ago with arranging and paying for your first driving lesson.

7 hours ago, stokiescum said:

theres tens of thousands of empty rooms in house we are paying for via houseing benifits,id make em take a lodger in.ive got a lodger i dont do it because i need to i do it because its free cash.ive known him many years and i saw how he was treated when he came out of the fostering and adoption system.in many ways i surpose i treat him has one of my own kids.i even got him a job working with me.

Good on you for doing that Stokie.

The rules have changed and HB now gets paid on a "household" basis; e.g. one person gets the rent paid for a one bedroom flat.  Commonly known as the "bedroom tax" but entirely fair IMO.

The big exception to this rule is pensioners (ironic as they are the main source of under-occupation in social housing) however they are not exempt from Universal Credit which will have the same effect.

Give it ten years and anyone with a spare bedroom will be paying for it rather than receiving it as a freebie.

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8 hours ago, sarahbell said:

As far as I can make out, Homeless-Friendly is a Social Enterprise that has been set up just to give out medals. No doubt seen as a good money-making wheeze by its founders, but in effect, no more than a parasitical organisation.

Homesess-Friendly creates a need where one didn't exist. And naive companies will clamour to be accredited as Homeless-Friendly for a FEE

The same tosh as Investors in People awards, or any of the other stupid accreditation schemes that have spriung up to extract money out of companies, often lapped up by public sector organisations because they don't know any better.

No doubt there will be Gold, Silver and Bronze Homeless-Friendly plaques to proudly put on your wall.

Unadulterated Guff.

 

Edited by Hopeful

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Described as pointless "scout badges" by one chief exec whereas the current one seems sadly to be a collector; paying money out in order to put a blob of colour at the foot of the company notepaper that impresses nobody.

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4 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Described as pointless "scout badges" by one chief exec whereas the current one seems sadly to be a collector; paying money out in order to put a blob of colour at the foot of the company notepaper that impresses nobody.

 

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2 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

To pick up a theme that runs on here a lot, cars, just think how many tasks and skills contribute to your driving to work (or allotment!) this morning.  

I work from home. My car is a dressing gown today.

1 hour ago, Hopeful said:

As far as I can make out, Homeless-Friendly is a Social Enterprise that has been set up just to give out medals. No doubt seen as a good money-making wheeze by its founders, but in effect, no more than a parasitical organisation.

 

Thank god you've worked out what they do. Apart from the interesting 'homeless people are blah de blah" I had no idea what they actually did.

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2 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

Thank god you've worked out what they do. Apart from the interesting 'homeless people are blah de blah" I had no idea what they actually did.

 

And they'd do fekk all if people didn't apply for their bogus, dreamt up accreditation

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1 minute ago, sarahbell said:

It will be a badge of where to avoid. 

Yes, just like it is very wise to avoid any employer who has an 'Investors in People' plaque.

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9 hours ago, Hopeful said:

Yes, just like it is very wise to avoid any employer who has an 'Investors in People' plaque.

Ah, you too have worked for an investors in people badged organisation too.  

Does it still exist?  The biggest pile of fuckwittery imaginable. 

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2 minutes ago, One percent said:

Ah, you too have worked for an investors in people badged organisation too.  

Does it still exist?  The biggest pile of fuckwittery imaginable. 

The most systemic, institutionalised bulying and biggest cliques I have ever witnessed was within a gold plaque holder.

 

Edited by Hopeful

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2 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

The most systemic, institutionalised bulying and biggest cliques I have ever witnessed was within a gold plaque holder.

 

Yep, institutionalised bully was my experience too. One organisation we're so appalling that when it came for reinspection, the investors in people went away muttering we'll come back in six months. 

I was gone by then so never heard whether they kept it. xD

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Just now, One percent said:

Yep, institutionalised bully was my experience too. One organisation we're so appalling that when it came for reinspection, the investors in people went away muttering we'll come back in six months. 

I was gone by then so never heard whether they kept it. xD

I left too, A few years later the place went from gold to silver. Still a complete joke though. Pay money and you get a plaque. It was impossible to be productive in the place because everyone was fekking miserable and moaning the whole time, and goodwill between each other didn't exist. Fortunately for the management the place is on government money and so it is a slow decline that will see the top bods reach comfortable retirement before its nailed-on (IMO) demise. A hell of a waste of the staff's lives though.

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