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One percent

They don’t make them like they used to

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-43086375

The funeral has taken place for a woman whose tough life as a farmer in the Yorkshire Dales featured in a series of television programmes.

Hannah Hauxwell found fame in the 1970s as the programmes showed her difficult and remote life in Baldersdale, near Barnard Castle.

She died aged 91 at a nursing home in West Auckland, County Durham, in January.

It was in 1973 when Yorkshire Television's documentary Too Long A Winter introduced Hannah.

Viewers saw her struggle to run the 80-acre Low Birk Hatt farm after the death of her parents, and attempting to survive on less than £200 per year.

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i think a lot could have learnt from her

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Sad news, though not unexpected at her age. I saw the documentary when it came out, and have two books about her. (Seasons of my Life, and Daughter of the Dales.) I've met quite a few people who assumed she'd died years ago; she was only in her 40's in the documentary! I once visited Ilkley when she was doing a book signing many years ago. The queue to see her was massive, and stretched right around the block. Her beginnings were really humble, and very moving. RIP.

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Interesting how we think of people living these harsh existences as reclusive, but actually have a sociable outlook. I think they are trying to live an idealised life from an earlier time. Another wilderness woman now gone:

 

 

Edited by Caravan Monster

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I can't imagine running 80 acres by yourself! That must be one of those 18 hour days, 7 days a week setups. No wonder she couldn't find the time to get married etc.

Of course nowadays you could just approach Redrow, get outline consent, and sell it for a couple of million.

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11 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

I have no link for it but a caller on the radio said that she met HH when HH was playing the piano on a cruise ship; it was unclear if this was professionally.

So after those years of hardship she became as soft as the rest of us!

No, she didn't do it professionally, though she learned the piano when she was young. The film company went back to her in 1992 to do a documentary called " Innocent Abroad ". It was her first trip outside the UK, probably paid for by the company, and Hannah visited several European countries. She lived in a humble cottage in Cotherstone after leaving the farm, and had a quiet retirement.

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2 minutes ago, jay67 said:

No, she didn't do it professionally, though she learned the piano when she was young. The film company went back to her in 1992 to do a documentary called " Innocent Abroad ". It was her first trip outside the UK, probably paid for by the company, and Hannah visited several European countries. She lived in a humble cottage in Cotherstone after leaving the farm, and had a quiet retirement.

 

Thnak you Jay; that anecdote in isolation left several unanswered questions which you have excellently answered.

 

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I'm from farming stock myself. My Dad had pictures of ancestors from the early 20th century. They wore ragged clothes and must have worked hard in the days before machinery. The thing that struck me was how dignified and happy they all looked in their rags during yet another days hard labour. I look around today, with the abundance of everything, and half the people are broken. I think in the olden days they had what Orwell called a "simpler and harder" life which was more conducive to happiness (assuming you could get work and not starve!).

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5 minutes ago, billfunk said:

I'm from farming stock myself. My Dad had pictures of ancestors from the early 20th century. They wore ragged clothes and must have worked hard in the days before machinery. The thing that struck me was how dignified and happy they all looked in their rags during yet another days hard labour. I look around today, with the abundance of everything, and half the people are broken. I think in the olden days they had what Orwell called a "simpler and harder" life which was more conducive to happiness (assuming you could get work and not starve!).

Being knackered at the end of the day has a lot going for it

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6 minutes ago, billfunk said:

I'm from farming stock myself. My Dad had pictures of ancestors from the early 20th century. They wore ragged clothes and must have worked hard in the days before machinery. The thing that struck me was how dignified and happy they all looked in their rags during yet another days hard labour. I look around today, with the abundance of everything, and half the people are broken. I think in the olden days they had what Orwell called a "simpler and harder" life which was more conducive to happiness (assuming you could get work and not starve!).

If you look at photos of ordinary people from before about the mid sixties, most people seem to have a genuine look of happiness on their face when at beaches, in the high street, in factories etc. After about 1967 a spoilt, bored, sullen look creeps into the faces of younger people. Compare pictures of, say, the Isle of Wight festival in 1970 with those of, say, holidaymakers in Blackpool in 1960 and you'll see what I mean. 

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3 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

If you look at photos of ordinary people from before about the mid sixties, most people seem to have a genuine look of happiness on their face when at beaches, in the high street, in factories etc. After about 1967 a spoilt, bored, sullen look creeps into the faces of younger people. Compare pictures of, say, the Isle of Wight festival in 1970 with those of, say, holidaymakers in Blackpool in 1960 and you'll see what I mean. 

For all the absolute tosh that Blair / Brown brought in about GDP growth being their god (and Cameron / May continued; their is no left right difference in this nonsense) these monetary measures really do not improve people's lives.

I am at this moment wearing a polo shirt that became too small for my brother ten / fifteen years ago.  I actually prefer wearing that, with its thin patches, to a brand new ? £80 polo shirt.  All this excess money sloshing about makes no-one happier.  What makes people happy is family, friends, and time.  GDP per head ncreasing 10% will not make people happier.

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5 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

For all the absolute tosh that Blair / Brown brought in about GDP growth being their god (and Cameron / May continued; their is no left right difference in this nonsense) these monetary measures really do not improve people's lives.

I am at this moment wearing a polo shirt that became too small for my brother ten / fifteen years ago.  I actually prefer wearing that, with its thin patches, to a brand new ? £80 polo shirt.  All this excess money sloshing about makes no-one happier.  What makes people happy is family, friends, and time.  GDP per head ncreasing 10% will not make people happier.

Kids today in particular seem punch-drunk with material wealth. I know children who have activities every night of the week, and get mountains of presents for Christmas and birthdays. It seems to make them jaded and bored and desperate for the next adrenaline rush from computer games etc. 

When I were lad, I had Scouts on Thursdays and church choir on Sundays (which I didn't like so it didn't count), a 'big' present like a bicycle had to do for Christmas and birthday combined, and from other relations like grandparents, uncles and aunts etc I might get a small toy or a book. We weren't in any way poor, my parents just had that austerity era mindset, but would happily spend hours playing with us etc. 

Edited by Austin Allegro

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11 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

For all the absolute tosh that Blair / Brown brought in about GDP growth being their god (and Cameron / May continued; their is no left right difference in this nonsense) these monetary measures really do not improve people's lives.

I am at this moment wearing a polo shirt that became too small for my brother ten / fifteen years ago.  I actually prefer wearing that, with its thin patches, to a brand new ? £80 polo shirt.  All this excess money sloshing about makes no-one happier.  What makes people happy is family, friends, and time.  GDP per head ncreasing 10% will not make people happier.

If you’re not careful though it sounds like it’s ‘because I’m not worth it’ and is just another side of the same low self-esteem coin.

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5 minutes ago, SNACR said:

If you’re not careful though it sounds like it’s ‘because I’m not worth it’ and is just another side of the same low self-esteem coin.

I accept that charge to a degree, though it's more a stance of "I can afford a rare Ferrari so will instead drive a very ordinary car as I'm not jumping on that bandwagon"; a lot of much wealthier people than me do the same.  Zuckerberg, Buffet, and the IKEA founder all drove / drive ordinary cars.

It's also a "green" (in a good sense rather than a virtue-signalling sense) motivation.  I mend my socks so wear them ?two years more than somebody who chucks them out at the first appearance of a hole.  So my sock purchases are a third of your average person meaning less environmental damage from producing three times as many socks and discarding them.

I linked the R4 Your and Yours phone in which included amongst the callers a woman who on principle would buy nothing new barring underwear because she wanted to cause the minimum damage to the environment.

It's an acceptance of the necessity of having material goods combined with a dislike of materialism.  I like having old things; especially if my repairing them means that they continue in use.

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52 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

Being knackered at the end of the day has a lot going for it

Being physically tired is much better than being mentally tired. I try to get out at least once for week for a long walk, get the best sleep after that.

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1 hour ago, billfunk said:

I'm from farming stock myself. My Dad had pictures of ancestors from the early 20th century. They wore ragged clothes and must have worked hard in the days before machinery. The thing that struck me was how dignified and happy they all looked in their rags during yet another days hard labour. I look around today, with the abundance of everything, and half the people are broken. I think in the olden days they had what Orwell called a "simpler and harder" life which was more conducive to happiness (assuming you could get work and not starve!).

Happiness and boredom never go together. I just don't think you'd get bored working that hard 7 days a week, stopping only for church on a Sunday. 

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15 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

It's also a "green" (in a good sense rather than a virtue-signalling sense) motivation.  I mend my socks so wear them ?two years more than somebody who chucks them out at the first appearance of a hole.  So my sock purchases are a third of your average person meaning less environmental damage from producing three times as many socks and discarding them.

Reduce
Reuse
Repair
Recycle.

Absolutely. 
I am always amazed by how much people want to spend on clothes. 

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5 hours ago, sarahbell said:

Reduce
Reuse
Repair
Recycle.

Absolutely. 
I am always amazed by how much people want to spend on clothes. 

Most of my clothing is bought secondhand because I can buy good quality stuff reasonably. I don’t buy much clothing these days because I have plenty. I’m glad of those who pay top whack for stuff then clear out their wardrobe!

I also repair/alter clothes and replace buttons etc.

I don’t think a lot of younger people know how to cook from scratch and I don’t think a lot know how to repair clothing or even sew a button on either!

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On 17/02/2018 at 21:20, Austin Allegro said:

Kids today in particular seem punch-drunk with material wealth. I know children who have activities every night of the week, and get mountains of presents for Christmas and birthdays. It seems to make them jaded and bored and desperate for the next adrenaline rush from computer games etc. 

When I were lad, I had Scouts on Thursdays and church choir on Sundays (which I didn't like so it didn't count), a 'big' present like a bicycle had to do for Christmas and birthday combined, and from other relations like grandparents, uncles and aunts etc I might get a small toy or a book. We weren't in any way poor, my parents just had that austerity era mindset, but would happily spend hours playing with us etc. 

Yeah but when you were a lad schools had sports, and competition, and excitement, and danger. And you could go play outside later. 

If you want kids that are neither physical and mental jelly, nor feral scum, the sad fact is you have to have a program of proper education running in the evenings.

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2 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Yeah but when you were a lad schools had sports, and competition, and excitement, and danger. And you could go play outside later. 

If you want kids that are neither physical and mental jelly, nor feral scum, the sad fact is you have to have a program of proper education running in the evenings.

+1000 I reckon my 70s childhood was way, way more fun than many kids have now. At the same time, there were probably kids whose childhoods were worse than todays kids, because there was physical fear and bullying in my time, nearly everyone copped a bit of it.

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21 minutes ago, swissy_fit said:

+1000 I reckon my 70s childhood was way, way more fun than many kids have now. At the same time, there were probably kids whose childhoods were worse than todays kids, because there was physical fear and bullying in my time, nearly everyone copped a bit of it.

There were many not nice situations but because it was kids against kids generally nobody ended up with anything worse than a bruised arm or a nosebleed.

The legacy of those events was that you wouldn't freeze in a fight as an adult because you had had some proper scraps as a child.

The psychological effect of a mugging on someone who hasn't been through those experiences must be huge.

I tackled a mugger (many years ago, I was about 22) and whilst he got away (steep downhill and he was going full pelt so I couldn't hold onto him) he dropped all his stuff including the knife with which he slashed me, surface wound, didn't need stitches.

I think because of the rough and tumble of a childhood up to probably the 80s most blokes on here would do the same and not be particularly bothered about it.

I doubt that someone who's childhood was in the early 90s on would be as unphased.

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