• Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

Sign in to follow this  
sarahbell

999 addicts

Recommended Posts

This was featured on the news programme this morning.  It's just another pointless moan.

  • The vast majority of people would not consider making a fake 999 call so the message is clearly not aimed at them.
  • Anyone who does make fake 999 calls would not be dissuaded by a feature on a news programme so the message is clearly not aimed at them.
  • There are legal penalties for fake 999 calls so how are these five most frequent callers still racking them up?

It's just trumpeting loud and clear how useless the authorities are at stopping known individuals making repeated calls whilst achieving nothing.

"Look at us, we're really pathetic aren't we?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't understand the response -- charities like Mind were saying 'the individuals needs were not being met [by the emergency services]'.  This is bonkers.  They've clearly got a serious mental problem, and that isn't solved by pandering to them.  They should have their numbers logged and have all calls diverted to some 'mental illness' callcentre.  Sure, this might mean that a real emergency might be missed, but you can't just treat 5 times a day as normal -- let the mental illness callcentre do the triage.

10% of all calls are this type of call.  Sounds like diverting them would massively ease our emergency services call centres.  I can't imagine why this isn't the automatic response.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, dgul said:

I don't understand the response -- charities like Mind were saying 'the individuals needs were not being met [by the emergency services]'.  This is bonkers.  They've clearly got a serious mental problem, and that isn't solved by pandering to them.  They should have their numbers logged and have all calls diverted to some 'mental illness' callcentre.  Sure, this might mean that a real emergency might be missed, but you can't just treat 5 times a day as normal -- let the mental illness callcentre do the triage.

10% of all calls are this type of call.  Sounds like diverting them would massively ease our emergency services call centres.  I can't imagine why this isn't the automatic response.


This is a great idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Panther said:

It's just the typical refusal to take responsibility/exercise authority in the public sector - from ambulances to borders, nothing can be will be done

I'd refuse to take that decision too if the law and higher management allowed for me to lose my job or worse in the vanishingly unlikely circumstance of a real emergency arising for these people.

This needs to be enshrined in a legal decision either as an actual law or an accepted  precedent- if you make too many 999 calls you lose the right to be prioritised and you lose the right to compensation etc in the event that a real emergency arises and the reaction is slow.

Once again it's rights and responsibilities.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dgul said:

I don't understand the response -- charities like Mind were saying 'the individuals needs were not being met [by the emergency services]'.  This is bonkers.  They've clearly got a serious mental problem, and that isn't solved by pandering to them.  They should have their numbers logged and have all calls diverted to some 'mental illness' callcentre.  Sure, this might mean that a real emergency might be missed, but you can't just treat 5 times a day as normal -- let the mental illness callcentre do the triage.

10% of all calls are this type of call.  Sounds like diverting them would massively ease our emergency services call centres.  I can't imagine why this isn't the automatic response.

After a couple of days of ringing, Id be goign round a shooting the fuckers.

Seriously.

Stop panding to these attention seeking cunts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, swissy_fit said:

I'd refuse to take that decision too if the law and higher management allowed for me to lose my job or worse in the vanishingly unlikely circumstance of a real emergency arising for these people.

This needs to be enshrined in a legal decision either as an actual law or an accepted  precedent- if you make too many 999 calls you lose the right to be prioritised and you lose the right to compensation etc in the event that a real emergency arises and the reaction is slow.

Once again it's rights and responsibilities.

Years ago administrators would do their jobs and administer, not paralyse themselves with the spectre of some legal challenge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, sarahbell said:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-43293581
 

Ambulances and emergency response vehicles were deployed more than 1,500 times to five patients in 12 months, the So-Called BBC has learned.

A total of 8,303 emergency calls were made by the five most frequent UK callers.

 

Imho we need to review the whole care in the community project 

There are so many examples like this of people with MH issues who clearly need help and support in an insitution, it’s got to be cheaper in the long run 

It may seem harsh but people will undoubted have died waiting on an ambulance that’s busy with one of these people 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The trouble with dealing with people like this is that you don't know if they genuinely have a mental condition or are just dickheads. If they are bona fide mentalists they shouldn't be in the community and should be in a care home. If they are dickheads they should be spending time in jail.

This is another example of society being soft on people that don't really deserve that much sympathy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

May as well face it.

We live in a country where virtue signalling, sky screamer, Snowflake, SJWs rule.

Imagine Steptoe, Lily Allen and all the other toss pots if the emergency services did not respond

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

zen-meditation-636x380.jpg

I try not to elicit a direct response from such articles (which is what they want?). Don't worry. Take some positives. I will assume nothing will change for us to see in public. But ask where did the story originate from and who wrote it and what is their motive. Is it to unite us or divide us. Is it to create love or is it to create hate? Who benefits?

I am sure this issue has been around since the day dot, which is why there is a story of "the boy that cried wolf".

I am probably sure that the computer already flags them up already and an actual ambulance does not attend 5x a day, but maybe a first repsonder on a bike in most cases or the call centre deals with the issue over the phone or sign posts them to an appropriate source of help

With something that is "free" there is always an issue of the "the tragedy of the commons" regardless of mental illness. This is up to the authorities to plan and manage this which will never be elimited in an system of services that are free at the point of access. Go anywhere in the world, there will always be someone crying "wolf".

Other positives - during quiet times it keeps the call centre on its toes and ensures that the emergency services do not reduce staff to save money. It's like life and evolution - always being tested by the environment, predators and even the smallest things such as viruses and bacteria. "Life will find a way" to mould and shape our emergencies each day - they have to adapt, and to be able to meet the continuing changing needs of the population that it serves.

As more people live alone and don't talk to their neighbours, people are more likely to call the emergency services. If you are alone and vulnerable, then it will seem like an emergency to yourself. And don't forget about dementia also. 

 

Edited by 201p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, 201p said:

zen-meditation-636x380.jpg

I try not to elicit a direct response from such articles (which is what they want?). Don't worry. Take some positives. I will assume nothing will change for us to see in public. But ask where did the story originate from and who wrote it and what is their motive. Is it to unite us or divide us. Is it to create love or is it to create hate? Who benefits?

I am sure this issue has been around since the day dot, which is why there is a story of "the boy that cried wolf".

I am probably sure that the computer already flags them up already and an actual ambulance does not attend 5x a day, but maybe a first repsonder on a bike in most cases or the call centre deals with the issue over the phone or sign posts them to an appropriate source of help

With something that is "free" there is always an issue of the "the tragedy of the commons" regardless of mental illness. This is up to the authorities to plan and manage this which will never be elimited in an system of services that are free at the point of access. Go anywhere in the world, there will always be someone crying "wolf".

Other positives - during quiet times it keeps the call centre on its toes and ensures that the emergency services do not reduce staff to save money. It's like life and evolution - always being tested by the environment, predators and even the smallest things such as viruses and bacteria. "Life will find a way" to mould and shape our emergencies each day - they have to adapt, and to be able to meet the continuing changing needs of the population that it serves.

As more people live alone and don't talk to their neighbours, people are more likely to call the emergency services. If you are alone and vulnerable, then it will seem like an emergency to yourself. And don't forget about dementia also. 

 

Very good point. Dementia is rife nowadays and an elderly person living alone could be calling the emergency services dozens of times a day. 

Really they ought to be referred to social services but they will only put people in a home as an absolute last resort nowadays. An elderly person with dementia can live, sort of, with a carer coming in twice a day to wash and feed them, but in the meantime he or she could be on the phone dialling 999 every 10-20 minutes or so. Dementia patients can get 'stuck' in certain behaviours as with OCD, doing them over and over again. Usually it's a relation they phone but if they don't have anyone close it's just as likely to be the emergency services. 

In the old days such people were either in care homes or other institutions, were looked after closely by family, or didn't have easy access to a phone. 

 

Edited by Austin Allegro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Austin Allegro said:

Very good point. Dementia is rife nowadays and an elderly person living alone could be calling the emergency services dozens of times a day. 

Really they ought to be referred to social services but they will only put people in a home as an absolute last resort nowadays. An elderly person with dementia can live, sort of, with a carer coming in twice a day to wash and feed them, but in the meantime he or she could be on the phone dialling 999 every 10-20 minutes or so. Dementia patients can get 'stuck' in certain behaviours as with OCD, doing them over and over again. Usually it's a relation they phone but if they don't have anyone close it's just as likely to be the emergency services. 

In the old days such people were either in care homes or other institutions, were looked after closely by family, or didn't have easy access to a phone. 

 

Reminds me very much of the mentally ill brother in Love Actually. Without his sister, he would be just the type to call 999 ten times a day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.