• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Recommended Posts

Right, the bilberries have point blank refused to ferment.

This new experiment was started on Friday night and is Damson.

So ingredients for 1 bottle, handful of Damsons and 3 teaspoons (heaped) of sugar.

This is what it looked like in the bottle tonight after 4 days and in the glass.

20190827_164126s.thumb.jpg.38f0bd1a85f7ac2296e3bd23b8dcc2e6.jpg20190827_213206s.thumb.jpg.f7740663d5d4ef3e61e82afed122a3ff.jpg

Went off like a rocket, had to open it over the bath as it was spraying everywhere and the vigorous eruption brought forth the cast from the bottom of the bottle so it looks like cresta (its frothy man).

Anyway quite nice and plummy without being fruity and eminently quaffable.

Conclusion, damsons work and the colour is great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/08/2019 at 21:03, Chewing Grass said:

Right, fermentation and things of interest.

Been branching out from the ginger beer and did ginger and rhubarb which fermented like an express train, so much . after 3 days it was like letting off a bottle of champagne.

Have also done so bilberries (or whimberries or blaeberries depending on your geographical persuasion) that made a beautiful deep red syrup and has a great colour but refused to ferment.

Even thought I had forgot to add yeast so redosed it and still nothing.

Thought it might be lack of acidity so did another bottle and added the juice of 1/2 lemon to the bilberry syrup.

Two days later and this one hasn't budged.

Can only think that the berries have some anti-yeast property.

Picture doesn't do the colour justice.

bilberry.thumb.jpg.361347d9c38e1d3213cde5ec791fd84f.jpg

Have bilberries got enough natural yeast to produce fermentation? Better with Damsons

 Never tried doing it this way, always use a dried yeast to get fermentation when brewing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ninjaborrower said:

Have bilberries got enough natural yeast to produce fermentation? Better with Damsons

 Never tried doing it this way, always use a dried yeast to get fermentation when brewing

Use dried yeast in all bottles and they (bilberries) eventually did start to ferment, Damsons were slow off the mark as well.

Got some elderberries today so elderberry lemonade is being fermented.

Raspberry lemonade goes like an express train in the fermentation stakes.

Tip the bottles upside down now for 24 hrs and snift the sediment out like they do with champagne the calm the bottle in the fridge prior to drinking.

0 to drinkable in 4 days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Use dried yeast in all bottles and they (bilberries) eventually did start to ferment, Damsons were slow off the mark as well.

Got some elderberries today so elderberry lemonade is being fermented.

Raspberry lemonade goes like an express train in the fermentation stakes.

Tip the bottles upside down now for 24 hrs and snift the sediment out like they do with champagne the calm the bottle in the fridge prior to drinking.

0 to drinkable in 4 days.

I know some can get results from simply the natural yeasts from the skins such as damsons,

 I have to get out and get blackberrys pretty soon, normally try on getting 20 lbs for at least 5 gallons of blackberry wine, havent had much luck with elderberrys the last couple of years,

 I think blackberry and elderberry wine is the king of the hedgerow brew

Edited by ninjaborrower

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ninjaborrower said:

I know some can get results from simply the natural yeasts from the skins such as damsons,

 I have to get out and get blackberrys pretty soon, normally try on getting 20 lbs for at least 5 gallons of blackberry wine, havent had much luck with elderberrys the last couple of years,

 I think blackberry and elderberry wine is the king of the hedgerow brew

Was shocked how few elderberries there are now, when I last picked them in 1998 they were hanging like bunches of grapes now the bushes are few and far between and what clumps there are have been half stripped by the birds.

Blackberries are fantastic this year, if you find a good bush (North side is usually better than South side) they can almost be supermarket quality and appear to be much higher in sugar this year (not tart).

Had some steaming hangovers off elderberry wine in the past, its like the port of the country wines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Was shocked how few elderberries there are now, when I last picked them in 1998 they were hanging like bunches of grapes now the bushes are few and far between and what clumps there are have been half stripped by the birds.

Blackberries are fantastic this year, if you find a good bush (North side is usually better than South side) they can almost be supermarket quality and appear to be much higher in sugar this year (not tart).

Had some steaming hangovers off elderberry wine in the past, its like the port of the country wines.

I know , its really hard finding elderberrys now, its a shame because they add a real dark burgundy colour and flavour to the wine,

 The last couple off years i have made just blackberry wine and will end up doing the same this year by the looks off it,

 I know a sweet spot along a couple off fields that can give me pounds and pounds off them,, they end up in apple pies when not making alcohol !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Attempting my first Damson wine from my wine book by C J J Berry. Never tried it before but so far all is going well

Elderberry wine is one of my favourites. I usually start making it this time of the year and by December make a lovely mulled wine with it. Yet to visit my secret location for my elder berries. I just hope I am not to late as the birds for the last two seasons have taken much of the bearing fruit.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are decent berries.

Found that the best place for elderberries is the edge of a woodland trust wood abot 4 miles from my house as they tend to leave it alone by not cutting it like the farmers and council does.

Need to get some more blackberries but have not found a good large patch yet this year as the hedgrows have been mostly machine cut in the last month.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only grapes and malt have all the nutrients that yeast needs for a full ferment. With anything else, the ferment can need a bit of help. Spray dried malt or grape concentrate will work. Sometimes only a small amount is needed to get the ferment going.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No luck with my elderberry picking today. Third year in a row I have come back empty handed. I can only conclude a) I should start picking in early August as it appears the growing season now longer extends into early September b) birds and Eastern Europeans with their country ways are getting there first, and stripping the trees and hedges c) what was left on the trees was dried and useless that could be attributable to weather changes. As all other fruits this year have been bountiful and rich I can only conclude the growing seasons are finishing earlier each year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Agent ZigZag said:

No luck with my elderberry picking today. Third year in a row I have come back empty handed. I can only conclude a) I should start picking in early August as it appears the growing season now longer extends into early September b) birds and Eastern Europeans with their country ways are getting there first, and stripping the trees and hedges c) what was left on the trees was dried and useless that could be attributable to weather changes. As all other fruits this year have been bountiful and rich I can only conclude the growing seasons are finishing earlier each year.

You must be down South, elderberries are to be had up North with some bushes having finished and others still have green unripened berries on.

Took a carrier bag out with me when I went out on the bike and got half a bag but they were off about a dozen separate bushes, there wasn't a single really good bush though.

Edited by Chewing Grass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am down south. Up until 2014 there were loads. Nearly all picking sessions I would come back with enough for 2-3 demijohns worth.  I heading up North tomorrow for a long weekend so will try my luck there if I get a bike ride in the country or best along the canal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/09/2019 at 20:56, Agent ZigZag said:

No luck with my elderberry picking today. Third year in a row I have come back empty handed. I can only conclude a) I should start picking in early August as it appears the growing season now longer extends into early September b) birds and Eastern Europeans with their country ways are getting there first, and stripping the trees and hedges c) what was left on the trees was dried and useless that could be attributable to weather changes. As all other fruits this year have been bountiful and rich I can only conclude the growing seasons are finishing earlier each year.

I agree, i think im leaving it to late for elderberrys, they are drying to early and waiting till september and early autumn isnt the best plan, i dont think EE  pickeys are getting them when indigenous pickeys like me are leaving it to late

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • By One percent
      Surprised no one has posted this. 
      A shortage of CO2 means that beer is going to run out. 
      i think we are still ok for gin though 
      https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44545010
    • By Frank Hovis
      I have heard a few times that back in the 50s, 60s, 70s that, unless you were home brewing, drinking at home was uncommon because it was much cheaper to drink beer in a pub.
      Which makes sense: the pub has economies of scale, less and reusable packaging (barrels, glasses), and the beer doesn't need additional treatment such as pasteurization before canning.
       
      Now this has swung entirely the other way. Beer in pubs is something like 3x or 4x the price of beer in an off licence and the pubs I frequent are more eating than drinking places these days as having eight pints costs you £30 out or from £5 - £10 at home.
       
      I can guess at some drivers - pub rents if tenanted - but the scale of the change suggests much bigger factors have caused this. Any insights?
    • By One percent
      Ok, I thought a separate thread for this.
      the first wine for tasting.  Have we to spend the week getting hold of a bottle and then adding our thoughts here.  Then we can suggest another for next Friday. 
      need to add the wine.  Didn't copy correctly.  I will be right back with it
      http://www.waitrosecellar.com/all-wines/triade-rosso
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.