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spunko

Normalisation of depression

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The onslaught of coverage over Prince Harry's comments yesterday made me want to weep. Not because of the level of coverage - that's surely a given, a symptom of the 24 hour rabid, news-heavy society that we're living in.. My issue is more with the outright acceptance of depression, without question, and the way we are expected to fawn over anyone who 'bravely' mentions it. Why am I supposed to care? I don't.

I've had depression to varying degrees as I'm sure most have, but I wouldn't dream of telling anyone besides my partner in real life. Why lumber other people with your issues? And why is Harry speaking out on this now - it all seems to be PR focused (par for the course with the Royals). Is it all part of the normalisation of certain alleged illnesses & conditions that are creeping into society? Autism, OCD, depression - I'm sure these are badges of honour to some people.

I'm not denying that depression exists, it obviously does, but the normalisation of it just cheapens it for those who are genuinely suffering from it, as if it's the common cold.

 

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I think most of the mental health issues in the UK are due to "Build it and they will come".

I saw this Harry thing being discussed on breakfast this morning. Apparently this helps to "Normalise" mental health issues. 

Really ? You can't look anywhere in the media without hearing about mental health issues. 

Doctors hand out anti depressants with barely a thought. 

Personally i think normalising mental health issues in the UK is part of the problem and not the solution. 

Whilst of course i realise there are plenty of folk out there with real issues. I think most are just bored and need to get a grip. 

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1 minute ago, ccc said:

 

Whilst of course i realise there are plenty of folk out there with real issues. I think most are just bored and need to get a grip. 

I know that saying 'get a grip' is considered trite but that is the solution for most people. There's always a cause of depression; popping pills isn't going to fix anything if you leave the source of the problem wide open.

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It actually makes me MORE depressed reading about this Royal shit.

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2 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

Ask your GP if it's enough to get signed off work for a week :Jumping:

I'm self employed! I only wish I could get sick pay :)

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I presume there's some fawning interest in it because he's royalty and there still appears to be a sizeable number of people interested in the royal family. There's the Diana angle, too. Fills pages and sells papers/gets clicks.

I don't mean to be discourteous to people suffering depression, as per the OP, I suffer from this on and off, it seems to be just how I am wired up.

And for me, the route "out" and the "answer" is to "give myself a shake" and "get over it". Force myself to do things - different things.

That's only for me and for generalised depression which has no specific cause, it's just a cyclical mind-set that I have.

But then nobody can see into the mind of someone else, and the royals are probably a bit more "distant from us" and more difficult to empathise with than most.

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5 minutes ago, DTMark said:

I presume there's some fawning interest in it because he's royalty and there still appears to be a sizeable number of people interested in the royal family. There's the Diana angle, too. Fills pages and sells papers/gets clicks.

I don't mean to be discourteous to people suffering depression, as per the OP, I suffer from this on and off, it seems to be just how I am wired up.

And for me, the route "out" and the "answer" is to "give myself a shake" and "get over it". Force myself to do things - different things.

That's only for me and for generalised depression which has no specific cause, it's just a cyclical mind-set that I have.

But then nobody can see into the mind of someone else, and the royals are probably a bit more "distant from us" and more difficult to empathise with than most.

"Force myself to do things - different things." Absolutely spot on. It could be the littlest of things: Just do anything to shake you out of a Groundhog day mentality. 

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41 minutes ago, DTMark said:

I presume there's some fawning interest in it because he's royalty and there still appears to be a sizeable number of people interested in the royal family. There's the Diana angle, too. Fills pages and sells papers/gets clicks.

I don't mean to be discourteous to people suffering depression, as per the OP, I suffer from this on and off, it seems to be just how I am wired up.

And for me, the route "out" and the "answer" is to "give myself a shake" and "get over it". Force myself to do things - different things.

That's only for me and for generalised depression which has no specific cause, it's just a cyclical mind-set that I have.

But then nobody can see into the mind of someone else, and the royals are probably a bit more "distant from us" and more difficult to empathise with than most.

As far as I can tell that is how 'normal' people deal with depression -- it is a part of life to feel a bit down, and we seem to have this built in mechanism that snaps us out of it.  Perhaps we'll wallow in the depression for a few days and then pull out of it.  But some people (who suffer from depression) can get into a cycle where that mechanism breaks down (or never works to start with) and the depression becomes entrenched.  Those type of people I guess get helped with things like CBT or whatever.  The question is, is the normalisation of depression (or mental illness in general) going to make it more likely for a 'normal' person to actually suffer properly from a clinical depression because they encourage it within themselves?  IMO it is unlikely, although it might do a disservice to people who actually have depression, as it suggests that if only they'd sort themselves out / pull themselves together then they'd be okay, but it isn't like that for them.

Re the royals -- I'd suggest that it is the sort of thing that a normal person would manage to get over, with perhaps a little help from friends and family, but for the princes they've not been able to escape their past (never ending press reports, interviews, even casual conversations with new friends), and it might take professional intervention to help them cope with it.

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Just another example of attributing of blame to 'shit happens'

Give something a label and it becomes an attachment that you can leverage for why your life went in a certain direction. 

Growing snowflake generation in part due to unrealistic expectations of life based on their boomer/gen x parents coupled with SJWs who are convinced there's a problem to fix.

add that to a liberal media and liberal educational institution where critical theory is lauded whilst the Socratic method is forgotten and you've got the perfect environment for the blame culture we find ourself in to breed. 

"It's not my fault. It's because of XYZ. I'm going to sue you, and by the way I've got depression you heartless fuck" is our brave new world. 

This comes from someone who has had depression and outside of having CBT, and mentioning it in this sentence, have not bothered anyone or blamed any inadaqacies on it. 

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3 minutes ago, SCC said:

I'll repeat what I said on 'other place:

I think we're only beginning to understand the mind-body connection. The mind clearly tells some of the body what to do, and it's more than walk in particular direction. Increasingly, it's looking like the body also tells the mind what to think. Both of these work on a conscious and unconscious level. Some areas look utterly unexpected e.g. who'd have thought that microbes in your gut could affect your mood?

To understand and fix problems in this area takes more than a simple pill, or pronouncements from those who likely have never suffered from depression.  I do think there are steps you can take that will help - but not wholly - prevent depression. 

I've been through some pretty horrible experiences, and had some dark periods (but nothing I'd actually describe as depression although others might disagree). The things I found helped prevention wise were:

  • Regular exercise
  • A diet that suits me
  • Meditaton
  • Getting outside
  • Some vitamin supplementation
  • Positive self-talk
  • Helping others
  • Goal setting
  • Daily gratitude practice e.g. a diary.
  • Avoidance of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs. Ditto common medications. 
  • Focussing on buying experiences that you can anticipate/talk about rather than objects (especially for others)
  • Paying it forward/doing nice things for relative strangers invisibly.
  • Building social connections (this one not completely cracked yet).
  • Financial security
  • Cutting out TV news. Reduced exposure to other news.
  • Being focussed, but not rigid about rituals around some of the above. 

All of these have been slowly introduced and tested. 

Wise words...

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2 minutes ago, SCC said:

I'll repeat what I said on 'other place:

I think we're only beginning to understand the mind-body connection. The mind clearly tells some of the body what to do, and it's more than walk in particular direction. Increasingly, it's looking like the body also tells the mind what to think. Both of these work on a conscious and unconscious level. Some areas look utterly unexpected e.g. who'd have thought that microbes in your gut could affect your mood?

To understand and fix problems in this area takes more than a simple pill, or pronouncements from those who likely have never suffered from depression.  I do think there are steps you can take that will help - but not wholly - prevent depression. 

I've been through some pretty horrible experiences, and had some dark periods (but nothing I'd actually describe as depression although others might disagree). The things I found helped prevention wise were:

  • Regular exercise
  • A diet that suits me
  • Meditaton
  • Getting outside
  • Some vitamin supplementation
  • Positive self-talk
  • Helping others
  • Goal setting
  • Daily gratitude practice e.g. a diary.
  • Avoidance of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs. Ditto common medications. 
  • Focussing on buying experiences that you can anticipate/talk about rather than objects (especially for others)
  • Paying it forward/doing nice things for relative strangers invisibly.
  • Building social connections (this one not completely cracked yet).
  • Financial security
  • Cutting out TV news. Reduced exposure to other news.
  • Being focussed, but not rigid about rituals around some of the above. 

All of these have been slowly introduced and tested. 

Can't disagree with any of that. Especially exercise and financial security. 

"Money doesn't bring you happiness" - sort of, but worrying about money certainly makes you miserable. 

Helping others as wel can bring enormous satisfaction. Whenever I do it though I wonder if it's my own narcissism kicking in or if I'm being truly altruistic. 👼🏼

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We have very high rates of depression in the developed world. They have barely any in the undeveloped world.

I've never suffered from it but believe it is (in the vast majority of cases) a very real phenomenon. By treating the symptoms at an individual level with pills/therapy and normalising that, we are very much sidestepping the real issue of what about our society/lifestyle are the root causes of this shockingly widespread problem.

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I think one of the main problems with modern life is that you compare yourself against people on TV and Facebook. Few of us are going to be billionaires or supermodels so we feel failures when we see them on TV. Obviously everyone posting on Facebook is having an awesome life and we feel we're missing out when we read about what they are up to.

I think reading about Prince Harry makes us feel better as he's someone that has a lot going for him ie he's one of the finest swordsmen in the world, he's very rich and he can become an admiral (with full uniform) with no work. When he talks about depression it makes people realise that famous/ rich people have the same problems as us.

 

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I know a few people wo have suffered from depression. One for exterme they killed themselves.

It does exists and is real.

However, I know about 5 times that number who swing it to get time off/avoid work.

It really is being used as the modern bad back esp. for people two have never worked.

Maybe with depression GPs need to inists that people remain in work, or proscribe 4 weeks work at Tescos for the doleys.

One ofthe scammsters cottoned on 10 years ago, so got himself on DLA with depression. He's spent the last 10 years watching telly and smoking dope. Whatever problem he had previously - which were made up - he now has huge problems - cannot go outside, memory of a goldfish, just fucking nuts/paranoid. And theyve stopped his DLA. Stupid twats, all of them - scamsters + DSS.

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21 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

We have very high rates of depression in the developed world. They have barely any in the undeveloped world.

I've never suffered from it but believe it is (in the vast majority of cases) a very real phenomenon. By treating the symptoms at an individual level with pills/therapy and normalising that, we are very much sidestepping the real issue of what about our society/lifestyle are the root causes of this shockingly widespread problem.

I wonder if this is really true or if it's simply unmeasured. One of my wife's relatives (she is from an indigenous tribe in Borneo) was effectively non-functional after having a breakdown several decades ago.  My suspicion is that loss of status together with high expectations has caused the breakdown and subsequent depression. He had been the youngest in a well off family and his branch basically ended up scratching out a living because he had no clue how to lead a household, never mind generate wealth etc. His wife (from a poor family) had effectively kept the wolves from the door, got the kids educated to lift them out of poverty etc for decades while he spent the years sitting on his mat listening to the radio.  BTW we are talking about a branch of the tribe which until a decade or so ago didn't have running water so 'wealth' was relative. 

Edited by SCC

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I've a mate who's a GP. He is sick and tired of fat people sitting in front of him with depression.

And when he suggests they're over weight and that's a big part of the issue....he gets denial that they're fat. 

He told me recently that he suggested to one fat depressed woman that it might be a good idea to lose weight. Her response was anger because she considered herself a normal weight. When she climbed onto the scales....she was actually morbidly obese  ...not just fat.

My Mum's an interesting person. She's full of energy and always active and NEVER gets depressed. She told me recently that when the war finished they were all so thankful to still being alive.  Most people today have never experienced the fear and relieve and are just consumers who have little understanding of anything outside their narrow minded existence. 

Depression is a killer....but then so is over consumption.

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24 minutes ago, spygirl said:

I know a few people wo have suffered from depression. One for exterme they killed themselves.

It does exists and is real.

However, I know about 5 times that number who swing it to get time off/avoid work.

It really is being used as the modern bad back esp. for people two have never worked.

Maybe with depression GPs need to inists that people remain in work, or proscribe 4 weeks work at Tescos for the doleys.

One ofthe scammsters cottoned on 10 years ago, so got himself on DLA with depression. He's spent the last 10 years watching telly and smoking dope. Whatever problem he had previously - which were made up - he now has huge problems - cannot go outside, memory of a goldfish, just fucking nuts/paranoid. And theyve stopped his DLA. Stupid twats, all of them - scamsters + DSS.

1 in 6 people in N. Ireland are claiming DLA and numbers growing every year.  Shocking statistic. 

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I should add that the difference between mild depression -what all the lead swingers are going for - and clinical depression is about he same as the difference between heart burn and a heart attack.

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