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Frank Hovis

Really odd things that became accepted

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11 minutes ago, BurntBread said:

I have a Mexican friend, and she introduced me to a delicacy you can (or could) get in cans over there. It's basically a black fungus growing on maize kernels, and it looks exactly like that: some spent maize kernels, and a really suspicious black fibrous mass. It tasted pretty good, if I remember right, but I asked her exactly that question: who, looking at that filthy mess, would ever be possessed of the idea that trying to eat it would be a good idea, rather than a short-cut to at least a week off work? In fact, she gave the obvious answer: if you're starving, you'll try anything. I'm less clear on how she managed to get me to eat it, though, as I definitely wasn't starving.

51bjRB13vyL.jpg.29a82cb8fbeca9e8f6ff9919f9e0d69f.jpg

:Sick1:

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How did a metaphor to describe varying quality in NHS care, by postcode area, end up being an actual lottery people pay to participate in.             

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Almost every advert * on TV having brown and black people in it - in a country where they form the minority.

And, still, people moaning about under-representation of minorities.

* is it just me, or is it just in the ad breaks for the things that I watch?

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18 minutes ago, DTMark said:

* is it just me, or is it just in the ad breaks for the things that I watch?

No it's not. I believe you have to be a mixed race couple to even enter a furniture store, put gravy on your dinner or clean your floor. ;)

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Just now, DTMark said:

Doing a stint as an unpaid checkout operator when you pop into the supermarket for some shopping.

I wish you'd smile at me when you scan my Coco Pops, being unpaid is no excuse.

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3 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

I wish you'd smile at me when you scan my Coco Pops, being unpaid is no excuse.

PMSL

I was, actually, a checkout operator at Sainsbury's when I was a student. I even won an quarterly area award. Career went downhill from that point.

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13 hours ago, DTMark said:

Doing a stint as an unpaid checkout operator when you pop into the supermarket for some shopping.

Sometimes I'd rather do this for free and take my time rather than have some chad in the queue breathing down my neck like in Aldi.

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13 hours ago, DTMark said:

I was, actually, a checkout operator at Sainsbury's when I was a student. I even won an quarterly area award. Career went downhill from that point.

My last job was as a checkout operator at Morrisons (6 - 7 years ago). Was contracted for 20 hrs / week but my Mgr let me do 32 hrs / week which was quite a nice number of hours a week.

That got cut back to the contracted 20 / week after the store had an expensive refurb. Didn't like the drop in money so applied for alternative jobs. A month later I got my current NHS job. :)

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On 27/03/2018 at 12:23, Austin Allegro said:

Parking on the street outside one's house. Before about 1960 it could only be done at night if you kept the headlights on, which in practice meant you had to have a garage if you wanted to have a car. Then the law changed and by the early 70s most streets were lined both sides bumper to bumper with parked cars, turning them into rat-runs.Now we barely even notice it until we see old pictures and realise how much wider and less cluttered they looked. 

This, I agree with. Particularly noticeable down leafy suburban streets which were designed for at most one car per family. Then, the kids returned from Uni, 2005 onwards. No graduate jobs available, rent unaffordable. So they end up back at mum and dad's - plus the car. Suddenly, space for four cars is needed. Rinse and repeat down the street and...

People look at you as if you've trodden dog poo through their home if you dare suggest that this was obvious, foreseeable and avoidable...

Because they're the ones who voted for it.

On 27/03/2018 at 13:12, Austin Allegro said:

Cultural self-hatred and denigration. We're really the only country in the world that does this. Partly it's a result of post-Imperial guilt and partly the influence of international socialism on the intelligentsia, but it doesn't seem to happen in countries such as France that also had an empire and were heavily influenced by socialism. 

I'm not so sure. It's like families:

You wouldn't let an outsider come in and tell you that your parenting skills are non-existent, your taste in home decor is rubbish and that your cooking would be banned by a UN treaty on the inhumane treatment of offenders. But, in the family - we'd be honest about how useless we are. However, we'd defend the family's reputation, even if it did mean admitting you actually liked the wallpaper and that the stew wasn't that bad...

I've had colleagues from each of the countries I've worked in, openly talk about what they can't stand about 'home' and why they want to (and in many cases, eventually do) leave. They'll say things like, "Why did you choose to work here? This country is so corrupt!" And I'll be thinking, "Nowhere near as corrupt as the last place I've been, sunshine!"

 It's like Donald Trump's notorious "shithole countries" reference. Officially, governments were offended (and if they weren't, there were plenty of SJW's ready to take offence on their behalf). But, on the street; everyone knew exactly what he meant and recognised its candour...

But then again, I've not lived in the UK for a long time now. I only go back on holidays when the streets are strewn with union flags in anticipation of our next sporting defeat...

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1 hour ago, unregistered_guest said:

This, I agree with. Particularly noticeable down leafy suburban streets which were designed for at most one car per family. Then, the kids returned from Uni, 2005 onwards. No graduate jobs available, rent unaffordable. So they end up back at mum and dad's - plus the car. Suddenly, space for four cars is needed. Rinse and repeat down the street and...

People look at you as if you've trodden dog poo through their home if you dare suggest that this was obvious, foreseeable and avoidable...

Because they're the ones who voted for it.

I'm not so sure. It's like families:

You wouldn't let an outsider come in and tell you that your parenting skills are non-existent, your taste in home decor is rubbish and that your cooking would be banned by a UN treaty on the inhumane treatment of offenders. But, in the family - we'd be honest about how useless we are. However, we'd defend the family's reputation, even if it did mean admitting you actually liked the wallpaper and that the stew wasn't that bad...

I've had colleagues from each of the countries I've worked in, openly talk about what they can't stand about 'home' and why they want to (and in many cases, eventually do) leave. They'll say things like, "Why did you choose to work here? This country is so corrupt!" And I'll be thinking, "Nowhere near as corrupt as the last place I've been, sunshine!"

 It's like Donald Trump's notorious "shithole countries" reference. Officially, governments were offended (and if they weren't, there were plenty of SJW's ready to take offence on their behalf). But, on the street; everyone knew exactly what he meant and recognised its candour...

But then again, I've not lived in the UK for a long time now. I only go back on holidays when the streets are strewn with union flags in anticipation of our next sporting defeat...

I had an elderly aunt who lost her marbles and when I used to visit she'd look through the window onto the street and say 'what are all the cars doing here, what's going on? Is it a party'? or words to that effect. It was just the normal parked cars in the street but she remembered it from the 50s when it was empty. 

I think all countries have a moan about their own culture from time to time. But that's often done with a desire to improve it or return it to some (partly imaginary) golden past. The British intelligentsia seem to just want to destroy their own culture utterly. 

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9 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

I had an elderly aunt who lost her marbles and when I used to visit she'd look through the window onto the street and say 'what are all the cars doing here, what's going on? Is it a party'? or words to that effect. It was just the normal parked cars in the street but she remembered it from the 50s when it was empty. 

I think all countries have a moan about their own culture from time to time. But that's often done with a desire to improve it or return it to some (partly imaginary) golden past. The British intelligentsia seem to just want to destroy their own culture utterly. 

My Aunt, in her autumn dementure years, would look out of the window and wonder where all the parked cars had gone.

She was remembering the 1950's, when the Johns would double park to get into the knocking shop she ran.

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Gender fluidity and the whole trans movement in general. This includes the ability to 'identify" as something on a whim. I guess this will all culminate in being able to identify ultimately as another person entirely. Would make being stopped by the police interesting anyway.

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The idea that it is dangerous for children to play out of doors unsupervised. 

I grew up in London and the traffic wasn't as bad as today but it was still quite bad back then, but I was allowed to go anywhere I wanted more or less. When I was seven I was allowed to walk to and from school on my own (about half a mile) and when I was nine I was allowed to go anywhere I wanted (within reason) as long as I was back by a certain time. 

You never seem to see children playing unsupervised anywhere now. Yet this was the norm until when, mid nineties or so?

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5 hours ago, Austin Allegro said:

The idea that it is dangerous for children to play out of doors unsupervised. 

I grew up in London and the traffic wasn't as bad as today but it was still quite bad back then, but I was allowed to go anywhere I wanted more or less. When I was seven I was allowed to walk to and from school on my own (about half a mile) and when I was nine I was allowed to go anywhere I wanted (within reason) as long as I was back by a certain time. 

You never seem to see children playing unsupervised anywhere now. Yet this was the norm until when, mid nineties or so?

My kids were born 93/94 and spent their childhood in a rural village. Most of the village kids were boys. Myself and a few other parents didn’t have a problem with our boys playing in the woods etc unsupervised from about age 8 IIRC. The village was by the sea so the golden rule was don’t go near the water and the boys cooperated. Some parents criticised us for allowing our boys to be boys....playing unsupervised and making dens, making a swing, making bogey carts etc.

Stranger danger fear was rife in the village. No child has ever been abducted in that village to date and as far as I know no child has been groomed and abused by an adult. While I accept that parents can be unlucky when a monster like Robert Black abducts your child I believe that the chances are minimal of that happening. It’s more likely that your child will be abused or murdered by someone they know e.g family friend or a step parent. Obviously the stranger danger fears of parents are amplified in urban areas.

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On 3/30/2018 at 06:57, Fossildog said:

Gender fluidity and the whole trans movement in general. This includes the ability to 'identify" as something on a whim.

Experts frequently give neuroplasticity as a catch-all explanation, even though they don't understand what they are saying. A medic suggested to me that our brains might be reconfiguring themselves in response to the relentless media promotion of "gender is merely a social construct". Advertising works.

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1 hour ago, Everentt said:

Maybe this: work? Alain de Botton eat your heart out.

I didn't remember that thread. I'll read it again. 

Skimming the first page though made me think of an odd thing that is now accepted as normal. When I started in the world of work it was normal to start work for one company and stay with them for the rest of your working life. Long service awards were published in the works magazine, remember them?, until the age of 65 was reached when you were given a clock and told to fuck off.

I recall at a few job interviews being asked why I was a job hopper, ffs I was 15 or 16 and just trying to find out what I wanted to do. There was an archetypal story about someone looking for a new job after 20 years of being employed by one company being asked would he make a reliable employee?

Nowadays if you work for one employer for a few years you're regarded as a staid old plodder. 

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37 minutes ago, sleepwello'nights said:

 

Nowadays if you work for one employer for a few years you're regarded as a staid old plodder. 

That's really just one manifestation of the "change is good" mantra. Which funnily enough does not seem to apply to our relationship with the EU.

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