• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Sign in to follow this  
sarahbell

Parole board in trouble

Recommended Posts

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-43568533

 

A decision by the Parole Board to release the rapist John Worboys has been quashed, prompting the board's chairman Nick Hardwick to resign.

A legal challenge by two victims was upheld by the High Court, and the Parole Board praised the "bravery" of the women who brought the action

 

In November, the Parole Board decided to approve his release with "stringent" licence conditions, arguing its decision was based on appropriate evidence.

But the High Court judges said the Parole Board "should have undertaken further inquiry into the circumstances of his offending".

The case will now be referred back to the Parole Board and considered by a new panel, while Worboys remains in prison.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

I hope somebody makes a similar fuss about those two men let out of prison for rape who then raped and killed that Vietnamese woman. 

It was worse than that, they were both previously convicted of murder, they met in prison. Telling one of them burned his previous victims body.

Edited by Dipsy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember Nick Hardwick as our student union president when I was at Hull University. According to wiki he left with a 3rd class degree in English literature.He probably spent too much time in the Uni Bar like I did. Since then he's been on the public sector/quango gravy train- Centrepoint, Refugee Council, IPCC, HM Inspector of Prisons, and lastly the Parole Board. He'll probably retire now with a fat pension, or get a Knighthood for services to do-gooding.

Edited by Anglepoise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Dipsy said:

It was worse than that, they were both previously convicted of murder, they met in prison. Telling one of them burned his previous victims body.

I'm generally against the death penalty but in this case, I really can't find a reason for why those two should not hang. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Anglepoise said:

I remember Nick Hardwick as our student union president when I was at Hull University. According to wiki he left with a 3rd class degree in English literature.He probably spent too much time in the Uni Bar like I did. Since then he's been on the public sector/quango gravy train- Centrepoint, Refugee Council, IPCC, HM Inspector of Prisons, and lastly the Parole Board. He'll probably retire now with a fat pension, or get a Knighthood for services to do-gooding.

I hope he gets a spiked drink from a black driver then gets fucked up the arse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The job of the parole system should be party to the judiciary, not to parliament.   

I don't usually like the idea of these people being released, but I am sort-of content to allow independent, informed people to make this decision on my behalf.

It isn't the job of the media to make these decisions.  It definitely isn't the job of the mob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, dgul said:

The job of the parole system should be party to the judiciary, not to parliament.   

I don't usually like the idea of these people being released, but I am sort-of content to allow independent, informed people to make this decision on my behalf.

It isn't the job of the media to make these decisions.  It definitely isn't the job of the mob.

Yes an no.

Im not aware of other case.

Warboy was locked up and no further chargs brough as they thought he was in for life.

Starmer fucked with his law.

Parole fucked up by treating him like repeat shoplifter rather than a dangerous manipulativd loon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Yes an no.

Im not aware of other case.

Warboy was locked up and no further chargs brough as they thought he was in for life.

Starmer fucked with his law.

Parole fucked up by treating him like repeat shoplifter rather than a dangerous manipulativd loon.

hundreds of TICs not brought it seems.

Edited by BLOOLOO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't think they were TICs, but alleged crimes for which he was not tried- is that the same as 'left to lie on file'?

I'm not happy with the idea of a parole board basing their decision on alleged crimes for which someone has not been convicted. If there's a need to keep him in prison, he should have been re-arrested and tried for those, as far as I'm concerned.

As far as I can see the parole board have followed the rules. If the rules lead to decisions which appear to be unjust then change them, don't excoriate the people who have followed them.

Edited by Rave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the EU again!

Quote

Worboys was given a sentence on 21 April 2009 known as imprisonment for public protection (IPP). The home secretary introduced IPPs in 2003. The sentences were designed to imprison serious offenders, mostly sex offenders, who were perceived to be a risk to the public but could not be punished with a life sentence.

Criminals sentenced to an IPP would be given a minimum tariff before they were eligible for consideration by the Parole Board for release, but in theory could be kept in prison indefinitely as long as the Parole Board believed they still posed a threat. Worboys’ tariff was one of eight years.

Source :- https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/jan/05/why-is-john-worboys-being-released-after-less-than-10-years

Quote

The European court of human rights has ruled "arbitrary and unlawful" the operation of indeterminate sentences for the protection of the public (IPPs), currently being served by more than 6,000 prisoners in England and Wales.

The Strasbourg judges said the prison system was "swamped" by prisoners without fixed release dates after the indeterminate sentences were introduced in 2005. They said the three inmates who brought the case had "no realistic chance" of accessing the rehabilitation courses they need to qualify for release.

The new justice secretary, Chris Grayling, told MPs he was disappointed by the judgment, and intended to appeal against it. He said: "It is not an area where I welcome the court seeking to make rulings."

Source :- https://www.theguardian.com/law/2012/sep/18/strasbourg-judges-indeterminate-sentences-unlawful

So there you go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Anglepoise said:

I remember Nick Hardwick as our student union president when I was at Hull University. According to wiki he left with a 3rd class degree in English literature.He probably spent too much time in the Uni Bar like I did. Since then he's been on the public sector/quango gravy train- Centrepoint, Refugee Council, IPCC, HM Inspector of Prisons, and lastly the Parole Board. He'll probably retire now with a fat pension, or get a Knighthood for services to do-gooding.

Another Hull graduate here. Oddly, I don't recall him being SU President, but he lived in the same hall of residence as myself. (Needler, in Cottingham.) The 3rd in English is correct. He was also a very active lefty. His main claim to fame at Needler (allegedly) was that he was caught with two women in his bed by one of the cleaners. How he managed this when the Needler beds were based on a cramped design used in Swedish women's prisons, and Hardwick wasn't exactly sylph-like in those days, was a bit of a mystery. He was also advised not to reapply to stay at the hall for the following year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, jay67 said:

Another Hull graduate here. Oddly, I don't recall him being SU President, but he lived in the same hall of residence as myself. (Needler, in Cottingham.) The 3rd in English is correct. He was also a very active lefty. His main claim to fame at Needler (allegedly) was that he was caught with two women in his bed by one of the cleaners. How he managed this when the Needler beds were based on a cramped design used in Swedish women's prisons, and Hardwick wasn't exactly sylph-like in those days, was a bit of a mystery. He was also advised not to reapply to stay at the hall for the following year.

Im didnt go to Hull.

But this does seem like an example of all the leading student lefties I went to Uni.

They all end uup i nthe public, despite having nothing in the way of vocation degree or any aptitude at any thing.

A ocuple I remember seem to move between LAs and the NHS. - donging something. A couple have managed to get to this magic layer of public sector management where they just oversee stuff. All useles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, spygirl said:

A ocuple I remember seem to move between LAs and the NHS. - donging something. A couple have managed to get to this magic layer of public sector management where they just oversee stuff. All useles.

It sounds like a shit version of freemasonry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, eight said:

It sounds like a shit version of freemasonry.

Probably is - a clique of unemployable mouth breathers.

The bloke was on he radio, defneding the decision.

Why did you resign - Ministry of justice asked me to - ????!!!

Then he went on the say there was nothing in the notes. MOJ said there was.

Thing is, this is not 95% of the usual cases - thickies, shoplifting, etc.

This is a very notable, dangerous criminal, far outside the range of 'I was just leaving mands and did not notice the bottle of brandy in my bag ...'

Youd have thought he parole board would have expended considerable effort researching and double checking all this, including peaking to the police.

Instead, what I came away fro was - There was nothing on the notes. He said hed be good.

Fucking useless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Rave said:

I didn't think they were TICs, but alleged crimes for which he was not tried- is that the same as 'left to lie on file'?

I'm not happy with the idea of a parole board basing their decision on alleged crimes for which someone has not been convicted. If there's a need to keep him in prison, he should have been re-arrested and tried for those, as far as I'm concerned.

As far as I can see the parole board have followed the rules. If the rules lead to decisions which appear to be unjust then change them, don't excoriate the people who have followed them.

TICs have to be admitted by the defendant IIRC...saves having to prove each and every case.

I gather Warboys case they CPS assumed the TICs were not necessary (according to media reports by victims) as the case was serious enough already.

I also gather Warboys wont now admit to them either.

In which case the moment he comes out, he should be back inside with fresh charges.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Fucking useless.


The system is.

You need criminals to cease to be a problem - so that the public is safe when they are released.

there are options

1. Educate them so they no longer need to commit crime to earn a living.

2. Remove appendages relating to their crime. 

3. Remove them permanently from society.

asking them to say they're sorry isn't actually enough.

And if you're not a danger to the public then there's no need for prison. Alternatives need to be found - removing assets, removing tools of your crime, and education.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, spygirl said:

Im didnt go to Hull.

But this does seem like an example of all the leading student lefties I went to Uni.

They all end uup i nthe public, despite having nothing in the way of vocation degree or any aptitude at any thing.

A ocuple I remember seem to move between LAs and the NHS. - donging something. A couple have managed to get to this magic layer of public sector management where they just oversee stuff. All useles.

The SU president of my university was a raving loudmouthed leftie. Twenty years later I went to a reunion and he was exactly the same, mouthing off about lefty nonsense. I assumed he would be some sort of NGO hack but after checking on Linkedin I found out he was a director of a well known FTSE 100 company...absolutely on the cutting edge of capitalism but still pretending he was Wolfie Whicher from 'Citizen Smith'. xD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, XswampyX said:

It's the EU again!

Actually I don't think the ECHR is part of the EU, and I agree with them in any case, and I'd hope that any judge with half a brain in our own court system would have come to the same conclusion:

"The Strasbourg judges said the prison system was "swamped" by prisoners without fixed release dates after the indeterminate sentences were introduced in 2005. They said the three inmates who brought the case had "no realistic chance" of accessing the rehabilitation courses they need to qualify for release.

The new justice secretary, Chris Grayling, told MPs he was disappointed by the judgment, and intended to appeal against it. He said: "It is not an area where I welcome the court seeking to make rulings."

Clearly if you lock people up on the basis that they are obliged to undertake rehabilitation courses before they can be considered for release, and then fail to provide those courses, then you are not operating a justice system, you are operating a Kafka-esque system of arbitrary detention. Chris Grayling is an absolute cunt.

Edited by Rave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Rave said:

Actually I don't think the ECHR is part of the EU, and I agree with them in any case, and I'd hope that any judge with half a brain in our own court system would have come to the same conclusion:

"The Strasbourg judges said the prison system was "swamped" by prisoners without fixed release dates after the indeterminate sentences were introduced in 2005. They said the three inmates who brought the case had "no realistic chance" of accessing the rehabilitation courses they need to qualify for release.

The new justice secretary, Chris Grayling, told MPs he was disappointed by the judgment, and intended to appeal against it. He said: "It is not an area where I welcome the court seeking to make rulings."

Clearly if you lock people up on the basis that they are obliged to undertake rehabilitation courses before they can be considered for release, and then fail to provide those courses, then you are not operating a justice system, you are operating a Kafka-esque system of arbitrary detention. Chris Grayling is an absolute cunt.

I think we are getting to the point where people  who would never contemplate committing a crime fear the justice system more than those who commit crime willingly and without giving the criminal justice system any contemplation at all, which rather defeats the whole fekking purpose.

Edited by Hopeful

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Rave said:

Actually I don't think the ECHR is part of the EU, and I agree with them in any case, and I'd hope that any judge with half a brain in our own court system would have come to the same conclusion:

"The Strasbourg judges said the prison system was "swamped" by prisoners without fixed release dates after the indeterminate sentences were introduced in 2005. They said the three inmates who brought the case had "no realistic chance" of accessing the rehabilitation courses they need to qualify for release.

The new justice secretary, Chris Grayling, told MPs he was disappointed by the judgment, and intended to appeal against it. He said: "It is not an area where I welcome the court seeking to make rulings."

Clearly if you lock people up on the basis that they are obliged to undertake rehabilitation courses before they can be considered for release, and then fail to provide those courses, then you are not operating a justice system, you are operating a Kafka-esque system of arbitrary detention. Chris Grayling is an absolute cunt.

Sounds like a reasonable view point to hold.

Quote

Worboys was given a sentence on 21 April 2009 known as imprisonment for public protection (IPP). The home secretary introduced IPPs in 2003. The sentences were designed to imprison serious offenders, mostly sex offenders, who were perceived to be a risk to the public but could not be punished with a life sentence.

The sentence had no time limit when he was sent to prison so there was no point in doing him for the other 98 sexual assaults, but because of the ECHR ruling they wanted to release him as he only went down for 2 and they couldn't hold him.

Quote

It says: “We will not repeal or replace the Human Rights Act while the process of Brexit is underway but we will consider our human rights legal framework when the process of leaving the EU concludes.

“We will remain signatories to the European Convention on Human Rights for the duration of the next Parliament.”

This means that Britain will only the process of withdrawal if the Tories win the 2022 general election.

Mrs May made no mention of human rights in her speech unveiling the party’s manifesto in Halifax, west Yorkshire.

The European Convention on Human Rights is a post-war treaty setting out rights and freedoms that is completely separate to the European Union.

Tony Blair’s Labour Government wrote the legislation into British law in 1999 in the Human Rights Act.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, XswampyX said:

Sounds like a reasonable view point to hold.

The sentence had no time limit when he was sent to prison so there was no point in doing him for the other 98 sexual assaults, but because of the ECHR ruling they wanted to release him as he only went down for 2 and they couldn't hold him.

My opinion of Grayling was not formed purely on the basis of that one comment, I can assure you.

In any case, the article dates from September 2012. Since he remained Justice Secretary until 2015 one could reasonably lay part of the blame for the apparent failure to legislate for alternative arrangements to be made for people subject to illegal IPPs at his door. It's not as if this outcome could not have been foreseen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.