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man o' the year

Unjustified faith in new technology

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The new Dyson advert claims that they have stopped developing corded vacuums such is their confidence in their new cordless vacuums with a powerful new motor. Our hotel means that we have direct experience of a wide range of vacuums and I feel this is likely to be another retrograde step bringing worse performance in terms of cleaning and is symptomatic of inexorable move to having blind faith in new technology. This was exacerbated by eU legislation to limit vacuum cleaner power. The same is true for other items such as washing machines and driers. We prefer to use and discard rather buy supposed industry standard washing machines after frustration with repair services. Our washing machines last about a year and then are replaced. 

 I feel that the rush to electric cars is another example of this with no real justification or realization of the consequences of the move, neither in terms of practicality of cars produced nor in terms of supply of energy for them. The government have set unrealistic targets.

 I really could go on for pages in terms of vacuums' piss poor performance nowadays compared to the first generation of Dysons since which the move to near 100% plastic construction and needless gimmicks such as ball-articulation were accompanied by massive price hikes. The culmination was that we were so disaffected that we tried the Air Ram which again had a comparatively good (although still inferior to any Dyson) performance followed by a 2nd generation which has virtually no suction and does little more than spread dirt around. In fact the Air Ram I would put as one of the worst purchases we have made in 11 years of having our hotel.

 

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OK Wales is slightly behind the curve with technology.

School children and their teachers still point at planes.

Our town electrical repairer had a little shop with Roberts radios, Hotpoint washers, Indesit fridges, and the old Hoover vacuum cleaners.

The cleaners were 'refurbished' and sold with a 3 month guarantee and a pack of bags, or a spare cloth bag. He was firmly of the opinion that they were the pinnacle of vacuum cleaner evolution. Everything since is just bullshit marketing. 

I've had Dyson cleaners, all of which were shit, but didn't have to buy any bags. What they don't tell you is you spend three times as much twice as often on buying replacement filters and belts.

Our cleaners at work always have a Henry.

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40 minutes ago, man o' the year said:

The new Dyson advert claims that they have stopped developing corded vacuums such is their confidence in their new cordless vacuums with a powerful new motor. Our hotel means that we have direct experience of a wide range of vacuums and I feel this is likely to be another retrograde step bringing worse performance in terms of cleaning and is symptomatic of inexorable move to having blind faith in new technology. This was exacerbated by eU legislation to limit vacuum cleaner power. The same is true for other items such as washing machines and driers. We prefer to use and discard rather buy supposed industry standard washing machines after frustration with repair services. Our washing machines last about a year and then are replaced. 

 I feel that the rush to electric cars is another example of this with no real justification or realization of the consequences of the move, neither in terms of practicality of cars produced nor in terms of supply of energy for them. The government have set unrealistic targets.

 I really could go on for pages in terms of vacuums' piss poor performance nowadays compared to the first generation of Dysons since which the move to near 100% plastic construction and needless gimmicks such as ball-articulation were accompanied by massive price hikes. The culmination was that we were so disaffected that we tried the Air Ram which again had a comparatively good (although still inferior to any Dyson) performance followed by a 2nd generation which has virtually no suction and does little more than spread dirt around. In fact the Air Ram I would put as one of the worst purchases we have made in 11 years of having our hotel.

 

More profit in batteries for Dyson that's all.

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40 minutes ago, man o' the year said:

The new Dyson advert claims that they have stopped developing corded vacuums such is their confidence in their new cordless vacuums with a powerful new motor. Our hotel means that we have direct experience of a wide range of vacuums and I feel this is likely to be another retrograde step bringing worse performance in terms of cleaning and is symptomatic of inexorable move to having blind faith in new technology. This was exacerbated by eU legislation to limit vacuum cleaner power. The same is true for other items such as washing machines and driers. We prefer to use and discard rather buy supposed industry standard washing machines after frustration with repair services. Our washing machines last about a year and then are replaced. 

 I feel that the rush to electric cars is another example of this with no real justification or realization of the consequences of the move, neither in terms of practicality of cars produced nor in terms of supply of energy for them. The government have set unrealistic targets.

 I really could go on for pages in terms of vacuums' piss poor performance nowadays compared to the first generation of Dysons since which the move to near 100% plastic construction and needless gimmicks such as ball-articulation were accompanied by massive price hikes. The culmination was that we were so disaffected that we tried the Air Ram which again had a comparatively good (although still inferior to any Dyson) performance followed by a 2nd generation which has virtually no suction and does little more than spread dirt around. In fact the Air Ram I would put as one of the worst purchases we have made in 11 years of having our hotel.

 

My pre purchase angst last year, pushed me towards Shark vacuums. Any good? 

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3 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

Everyone uses Henry don't they? 

They work, they're tough, you can get all the spares for them, they're British and they're only £100. 

bloody good workout. got one for the bee vac.

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20 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

Everyone uses Henry don't they? 

They work, they're tough, you can get all the spares for them, they're British and they're only £100. 

I wanted a vacuum cleaner.  Asked a professional.  Bought a Henry.

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23 minutes ago, whitevanman said:

Everyone uses Henry don't they? 

They work, they're tough, you can get all the spares for them, they're British and they're only £100. 

Everyone's WIFE uses a Henry, surely?

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Dyson's 'revolutionary' designs are marketing bs, the cyclone vacuum was in use in industry before WWII and has been widely used before and since. I use henry and camvac at work. Cyclone demonstrated in the video

 

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1 hour ago, man o' the year said:

The new Dyson advert claims that they have stopped developing corded vacuums such is their confidence in their new cordless vacuums with a powerful new motor. Our hotel means that we have direct experience of a wide range of vacuums and I feel this is likely to be another retrograde step bringing worse performance in terms of cleaning and is symptomatic of inexorable move to having blind faith in new technology. This was exacerbated by eU legislation to limit vacuum cleaner power. The same is true for other items such as washing machines and driers. We prefer to use and discard rather buy supposed industry standard washing machines after frustration with repair services. Our washing machines last about a year and then are replaced. 

 I feel that the rush to electric cars is another example of this with no real justification or realization of the consequences of the move, neither in terms of practicality of cars produced nor in terms of supply of energy for them. The government have set unrealistic targets.

 I really could go on for pages in terms of vacuums' piss poor performance nowadays compared to the first generation of Dysons since which the move to near 100% plastic construction and needless gimmicks such as ball-articulation were accompanied by massive price hikes. The culmination was that we were so disaffected that we tried the Air Ram which again had a comparatively good (although still inferior to any Dyson) performance followed by a 2nd generation which has virtually no suction and does little more than spread dirt around. In fact the Air Ram I would put as one of the worst purchases we have made in 11 years of having our hotel.

 

Get H. Cecil Booth's round. Dyson and weak hoovers are shit.

A013996.jpg

 

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To be fair to Dyson,  they led the market in hand dryers that blow the water off instead of try to heat it up.

I’m sure they are eye wateringly expensive,  and now much copied..  but that was definitely a step forward.  

Everything else from hoovers to desk fans are all gimmicks AFAICT.

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6 hours ago, Cunning Plan said:

Everyone's WIFE uses a Henry, surely?

I don't vac. Eventually his desire to see the colour of the carpet overtakes his dislike of vacing.

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I can't imagine any Dyson would last five minutes in a commercial environment. I've run a huge fleet of Henrys for donkey's years. Earlier ones brushes aren't officially available but you can grind down a commonly available set slightly to fit, can't remember which it is off the to of my head. As we also do with laser printers of which again is a huge identical fleet of the exact same model they're swapped out returned to base and refurbed and repaired. Numatic, who make Henry are primarily a commerical market company who have moved into the home domestic market.

On the cordless front, there is a cordless Henry now and I got one with a view to using it for car interiors. I'II try to remember to post a more extensive cordless Henry review later. I've tried loads of other cordless and portable vacuums also, I'II try and recall.

I certainly wouldn't mourn the loss of the corded Dyson or any Dyson.

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Hoovers. Well I've managed to kill two this last twelve months, one Henry, one Miele. Plaster dust and building material (even just the final clear up after all major qty gone) is pretty abusive to any hoover. Both machines were well over a decade old. Bought new Henry to replace and to be honest for a new machine the level of suction is not what I'd expect, in  a domestic environment I'd rate the Miele as a better cleaning machine. Maybe this has something to do with the new EU rules that to be honest suck unlike the machines they effect. Meanwhile a proper industrial  machine (a big old Festool) carries on and on dealing with the major clear up but is so heavy when half full of rock that cannot be bothered to lug up and down the stairs and hence wearing out the other two, bags are expensive too, otherwise I'd be recommending a small one of those as possible candidate for a commercial machine, but pricey. Cordless - a lot to be said for going cordless and they will all improve as battery tech improves but you're looking at continuous use case so the fit is not right for commercial.

Electric cars - I think we'll look back and think why didn't this happen earlier. The efficiency, reduced component count and reliably SHOULD knock ICE engines out of the car park. They'll only get better and cheaper with battery advances. Easy to forget all the servicing and spares required on ICE cars and the costs rack up  over over the period of ownership.

Karchers - now there's a brand that has gone down the plastic hell route to the point of not being fit for purpose and unreliable junk apart from maybe their top end industrial models.

Washing machines. Rate Miele in the high end domestic ranges, though expensive and suspect servicing would be even more expensive relatively if needed. Well over a decade with current machine and no repairs needed and has had heavy daily use.

 

.

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Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, onlyme said:

Hoovers. Well I've managed to kill two this last twelve months, one Henry, one Miele. Plaster dust and building material (even just the final clear up after all major qty gone) is pretty abusive to any hoover. Both machines were well over a decade old. Bought new Henry to replace and to be honest for a new machine the level of suction is not what I'd expect, in  a domestic environment I'd rate the Miele as a better cleaning machine. Maybe this has something to do with the new EU rules that to be honest suck unlike the machines they effect. Meanwhile a proper industrial  machine (a big old Festool) carries on and on dealing with the major clear up but is so heavy when half full of rock that cannot be bothered to lug up and down the stairs and hence wearing out the other two, bags are expensive too, otherwise I'd be recommending a small one of those as possible candidate for a commercial machine, but pricey. Cordless - a lot to be said for going cordless and they will all improve as battery tech improves but you're looking at continuous use case so the fit is not right for commercial.

Electric cars - I think we'll look back and think why didn't this happen earlier. The efficiency, reduced component count and reliably SHOULD knock ICE engines out of the car park. They'll only get better and cheaper with battery advances. Easy to forget all the servicing and spares required on ICE cars and the costs rack up  over over the period of ownership.

Karchers - now there's a brand that has gone down the plastic hell route to the point of not being fit for purpose and unreliable junk apart from maybe their top end industrial models.

Washing machines. Rate Miele in the high end domestic ranges, though expensive and suspect servicing would be even more expensive relatively if needed. Well over a decade with current machine and no repairs needed and has had heavy daily use.

 

.

The suction on all vacuums has been reduced because their voltage has been cut by EU rules by as much as 40% in some cases. That said they still have more powerful motors than most 1960s vacuums.

Edited by Virgil Caine

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2 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

The suction on all vacuums has been reduced because their voltage has been cut by EU rules.

Certainly would explain the Henry - if they have just replaced the motor with a less capable one then it would compromise the design - it is a straight through design, other manufacturers may well eek out more performance through redesign but no scope for that with the standard footprint that Henrys have.

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11 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

The suction on all vacuums has been reduced because their voltage has been cut by EU rules by as much as 40% in some cases. That said they still have more powerful motors than most 1960s vacuums.

So what model/year Henry do I need to search for on eBay?

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