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spunko

Learning guitar

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Anyone here play guitar? Statistically I would assume at least one... :Jumping:

I bought a Yamaha acoustic guitar off Amazon a few weeks ago and really enjoy it,  and have now bought an electric guitar.  I'm struggling with the muscle memory though,  in particular,... Anyone have any real world ie not the usual tips? 

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I do, I'm OK, but nothing flashy in terms of playing. It tends to accompany my singing!

It is down to practice and learning a few songs. Funny how the F chord is the one that stops many a budding musician. The muscle memory will come.

In my younger days, being the guy with the guitar at a party, able to do a sing-a-long was a nice skill to have!

Do a bit of recording and can make stuff up, so guitar is a means to an end. My new FX pedal arrived this week! A little toy to play with...

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Get a chromatic tuner, one that has both a mic and a socket for your electric guitar. They're about £15, maybe less. Eventually, you won't need it but it will save a lot of frustration early on.

 

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3 hours ago, jm51 said:

Get a chromatic tuner, one that has both a mic and a socket for your electric guitar. They're about £15, maybe less. Eventually, you won't need it but it will save a lot of frustration early on.

 

Thanks have ordered one yesterday actually. Up to now I've been using Guitartuna app which isn't too bad to be honest. 

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The internet is wonderful for this stuff. I think it takes some weeks to get anything out of an instrument, except a few random notes, and suddenly you get a tune.

 

I don't think there are any guitar players here!xD

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2 hours ago, MrPin said:

The internet is wonderful for this stuff. I think it takes some weeks to get anything out of an instrument, except a few random notes, and suddenly you get a tune.

 

I don't think there are any guitar players here!xD

I know there's a few who collect nice guitars but are they played? :D

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My son does.  He played to a pub in Greenwich last week (first time in public) and got a great reception so he is on cloud nine at the moment.

I must admit it gives me a real warm feeling hearing him practising in his room.    

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On 4/11/2018 at 23:20, spunko2010 said:

I'm struggling with the muscle memory though,  in particular,... Anyone have any real world ie not the usual tips? 

Muscle memory with what...chords? Scales?

Guitar is wonderful because it's such an accessible instrument compared to piano or any classical instruments.

Even just being able to strum a few chords is great, and you can just continue to learn as and when you feel like it, for the rest of your life.

And of course you could also buy far too many* guitars like @MrPin and I have.

* there's no such thing as too many guitars

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It's impossible to keep a steady rhythm until your chord changes are fast enough. Playing the piece like the slowest of dirges but in time is the way to go. You'll get faster with practice. Can get a bit boring though.

Regular guitar tuning, from lowest note to highest is EADGBE. Using the chromatic tuner, you can tune to DGDGBD, which is open G chord tuning. Easy enough. 6th string (fattest/lowest note) is lowered in pitch, as is the 5th and 1st string. Now the guitar will sound good when strummed without the fretboard being touched.

The 3 chord trick:

If you're playing in the key of G, then the other 2 chords are C and D. A guitar tuned to open G will play a C chord if you use your index finger to barre the 5th fret. The 7th fret will play a D chord. You might prefer to play in a key other than open G as playing open strings then closed strings doesn't always sound right. The ratio stays the same. Choose a key, say B flat, which is the 3rd fret, barre that fret and go 5 or 7 frets lower for the other 2 chords.

The 12 bar blues:

There are a few variations of 12 bar but in the key of G, it's basically

G/G/G/G/C/C/G/G/D/D/G/G.  

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Two pence worth, lots of players will disagree ….

Depends what you want to achieve but to be able to play IMHO you really need to be able to read music. Many of the simpler classical guitar studies (eg Carulli, Sor et al) are based around the standard chords C Am G7 B7 Dm G Em etc have the advantage of all the notes being the same length so you can concentrate of finger positioning / movement for the left hand and plucking the individual notes with the right hand. A good book to start to learn to play and read music is by F Noad – Solo Guitar Playing Vol 1 (recommended by my classical guitar teacher years ago).

I think that TAB (showing finger string fret) has its place, especially for alternate tunings but for is limited compared to normal notation especially when indicating note length. Also after a time with normal notation you mentally map the individual notes of a key onto the fret board which I don’t find happens when reading TAB. So for a piece in Dm mentally you find your fingers are ready to play F natural and B flat. Just my opinion I am sure others will disagree.

If you want to play lead then again reading music is useful but I will also use TAB as some pieces are very TAB friendly but notationally difficult. The whole tone scale is one such instance.

Probably the most difficult, but ultimately the most flexible picking style is ‘alternate picking’ essentially using Up followed by Down followed by Up followed by Down as standard. Eg on the E string at 5th fret 1st finger Down, 6th fret  2nd finger Up, 7th fret 3rd finger Down and 8th Fret 4th finger Up …. Move to next string repeat. An even number of notes mean you start the next string with the same pick direction. But with an odd number of notes 1 D, 2 U, 3 D … move to next string and the pick direction is the opposite, 1 is now U with 2 D, 3 U. 10 minutes every day doing these type of exercise will strengthen the fingers, there are various books of these types of exercise eg Steve Vai 30 hour work out.

Worth looking at powertab pc software (free) and music files which are in music notation and tab so you can hear and see the notes being played on the score.

Oh and with practice the muscle memory will develop and if you can’t play it slow then you can’t play it fast.

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The hardest notes to play are the silent ones!

Aside from the basics, it's all Its about timing and rhythm. Unfortunately I have neither. 

 

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I finally restringed my guitar a couple of weeks ago and have tried to force myself to do a bit of practice every day. Trouble is I end up spending about five times as long watching guitar vids on youtube than I do actually trying to play things. I should probably stop being a tight bastard and actually pay for a few lessons.

Trouble is that recently I stumbled across this guy:

...and now I've started an endless process of dithering about buying myself a cheap bass as well.

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Before buying a bass guitar, use your current guitar to learn a few bass riffs. It'll be the same fingering. Then you can try out a bass in the shop and see if it suits you.

 

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Certainly a  lot more help around these days, compared to when I started in the 80s, with all the online stuff. 

If you're looking for some simple songs to learn, in order to have something to practice, and achieve, you could have a look on YouTube at Justinguitar. He explains things well, compared to some teachers, and has hundreds of songs and lessons, from basic onwards. 

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On 16/04/2018 at 12:38, jm51 said:

Before buying a bass guitar, use your current guitar to learn a few bass riffs. It'll be the same fingering. Then you can try out a bass in the shop and see if it suits you.

 

Suiting me is not really important as I'm obviously going to play it very little, if at all. What matters is that it looks cool.

So yesterday I won an ebay auction for a nearly new Squier Vintage Modified Jazz in Plain Maple. There's a proper Fender version in the window of my local music shop and it looks absolutely mint, so I have high hopes. I'm picking it up next Sunday.

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10 hours ago, Rave said:

Suiting me is not really important as I'm obviously going to play it very little, if at all. What matters is that it looks cool.

So yesterday I won an ebay auction for a nearly new Squier Vintage Modified Jazz in Plain Maple. There's a proper Fender version in the window of my local music shop and it looks absolutely mint, so I have high hopes. I'm picking it up next Sunday.

Make sure you make it to 500 posts before then so you can post a picture on the guitar porn thread.

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10 hours ago, Rave said:

Suiting me is not really important as I'm obviously going to play it very little, if at all. What matters is that it looks cool.

So yesterday I won an ebay auction for a nearly new Squier Vintage Modified Jazz in Plain Maple. There's a proper Fender version in the window of my local music shop and it looks absolutely mint, so I have high hopes. I'm picking it up next Sunday.

 

as the guitarist in the Mavericks said ..... the guitar is very important, it has to match the suit

mavericks.jpg

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On 16/04/2018 at 16:15, Uptherebels said:

Certainly a  lot more help around these days, compared to when I started in the 80s, with all the online stuff. 

If you're looking for some simple songs to learn, in order to have something to practice, and achieve, you could have a look on YouTube at Justinguitar. He explains things well, compared to some teachers, and has hundreds of songs and lessons, from basic onwards. 

Yep I've been watching his videos. I find him a bit too thorough,  and tend to prefer Marty Schwartz's ones. 

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51 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

Yep I've been watching his videos. I find him a bit too thorough,  and tend to prefer Marty Schwartz's ones. 

Not seen those. I'll check him out this evening. 

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19 hours ago, Rave said:

Suiting me is not really important as I'm obviously going to play it very little, if at all. What matters is that it looks cool.

So yesterday I won an ebay auction for a nearly new Squier Vintage Modified Jazz in Plain Maple. There's a proper Fender version in the window of my local music shop and it looks absolutely mint, so I have high hopes. I'm picking it up next Sunday.

I'm pretty sure the Squier models do the job. I like the Jazz bass over the Precision, as I only have medium hands

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