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Fruit Veg market seller told to not shout - might hurt someones feeelings

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http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/16160621.Aptly_named_market_trader_Wayne_Bellows_ordered_to_shut_up_by_council/#comments-anchor

Aptly-named market trader Wayne Bellows ordered to shut up by Lymington Town Council

The aptly-named trader, has been selling fruit and veg on the High Street for 35 years and is the fourth-generation stallholder.

Mr Bellows, 53, told the Daily Echo: “Five weeks ago I was handed a letter saying I’ve got to stop shouting for a couple of hours in the day. On Tuesday I received a phone call from the council saying that she did not want me to shout at all.

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7 minutes ago, One percent said:

They are undermining our way of life piece by piece. Fruit and veg sellers have always done this. Annoying but that’s what they do. 

They will be stopping church bells next 

Was happy to see in my home town a large collection of Morris dancers at the weekend, including many in black face. Always nice to see our traditions celebrated like this, maybe there is hope yet.

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Just now, Fossildog said:

Was happy to see in my home town a large collection of Morris dancers at the weekend, including many in black face. Always nice to see our traditions celebrated like this, maybe there is hope yet.

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My dog hates them and barks like mad. I think it’s the jingly bells sewn everywhere. xD

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Just now, dgul said:

They'll wait until all the old fashioned market traders have gone, then moan about how it's dreadful that we've lost this bit of culture and open a 'museum of markets' featuring recordings of market criers.  [funded by taxpayers]

Perhaps you’re a sarcastic old bugger like me? Your post made me laugh at the irony, i.e. allowing or enforcing traditional activities to die out then a money making scam (for successful bidders) is promoted to preserve it! 

I’m not so sure though that the traditional market will die. In rural Scotland they’re thriving albeit not cheap stuff. It’s marketing of home reared meat, bread made from old flours, home made beer, local honey, home baked pies, desserts etc.

Maybe markets are evolving and tapping into a desire for foodstuff that isn’t mass produced? I do hope so!

 

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7 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

Perhaps you’re a sarcastic old bugger like me? Your post made me laugh at the irony, i.e. allowing or enforcing traditional activities to die out then a money making scam (for successful bidders) is promoted to preserve it! 

I’m not so sure though that the traditional market will die. In rural Scotland they’re thriving albeit not cheap stuff. It’s marketing of home reared meat, bread made from old flours, home made beer, local honey, home baked pies, desserts etc.

Maybe markets are evolving and tapping into a desire for foodstuff that isn’t mass produced? I do hope so!

 

Markets are the only way to revive town centres.  You only have to go to a French town on a market day and it is bliss.  St Pierre sur Dives, Deauville,  Le  Touquet, all amazing.  A raggedy farmers market eg Haddington on the last Saturday of every month can’t compete.

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42 minutes ago, One percent said:

They are undermining our way of life piece by piece. Fruit and veg sellers have always done this. Annoying but that’s what they do. 

They will be stopping church bells next 

Oh i do hope so.

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18 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

Perhaps you’re a sarcastic old bugger like me? Your post made me laugh at the irony, i.e. allowing or enforcing traditional activities to die out then a money making scam (for successful bidders) is promoted to preserve it! 

I’m not so sure though that the traditional market will die. In rural Scotland they’re thriving albeit not cheap stuff. It’s marketing of home reared meat, bread made from old flours, home made beer, local honey, home baked pies, desserts etc.

Maybe markets are evolving and tapping into a desire for foodstuff that isn’t mass produced? I do hope so!

 

Rural Scotland Farmers markets are beyond expensive. The natives steer well clear. If you are ever in Edinburgh on a Sunday morning Stockbridge market is great but bloody dear. I was there last week, vintage stall selling old  sheepskin coats for £60.

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1 minute ago, Ina said:

Markets are the only way to revive town centres.  You only have to go to a French town on a market day and it is bliss.  St Pierre sur Dives, Deauville,  Le  Touquet, all amazing.  A raggedy farmers market eg Haddington on the last Saturday of every month can’t compete.

I agree that markets are a good way to go for people who want to make a living selling what they produce.

I can’t comment about Haddington, Edinburgh area? or French markets because I haven’t been to any there.

I’m tight about parting with money so regularly visiting various farmers markets and making purchases isn’t about saving money these days.

IMO it’s about buying a quality product that has minimalised contamination in the mass produced food chain.

Sometimes I’ll pay over the odds for food because I know the farmers market sellers have worked hard to produce their product as independently as possible. That’s how their produce is sold. The ethos is get back to eating good stuff as much as possible.

Of course it’s a struggle for independent producers against multinational corporations in uk but I’m willing to support the independents because IMO their produce is superior to supermarkets.

 

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2 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

I agree that markets are a good way to go for people who want to make a living selling what they produce.

I can’t comment about Haddington, Edinburgh area? or French markets because I haven’t been to any there.

I’m tight about parting with money so regularly visiting various farmers markets and making purchases isn’t about saving money these days.

IMO it’s about buying a quality product that has minimalised contamination in the mass produced food chain.

Sometimes I’ll pay over the odds for food because I know the farmers market sellers have worked hard to produce their product as independently as possible. That’s how their produce is sold. The ethos is get back to eating good stuff as much as possible.

Of course it’s a struggle for independent producers against multinational corporations in uk but I’m willing to support the independents because IMO their produce is superior to supermarkets.

 

Call me a cynic but having wandered round some farmers markets, I’m not convinced that they are. Middle men buying stuff and selling it as home grown. 

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9 minutes ago, Ina said:

Rural Scotland Farmers markets are beyond expensive. The natives steer well clear. If you are ever in Edinburgh on a Sunday morning Stockbridge market is great but bloody dear. I was there last week, vintage stall selling old  sheepskin coats for £60.

Sheepskin coats at farmers markets? Hopefully the Edinburgh trend will not get to the rural areas of Scotland.

I have bought many lovely locally produced food items at local markets on a repeat basis. I have never seen clothing for sale at a farmers market in my area of Scotland and I hop I never will!

 

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3 minutes ago, One percent said:

Call me a cynic but having wandered round some farmers markets, I’m not convinced that they are. Middle men buying stuff and selling it as home grown. 

I can only comment about the farmers markets in my low population area of Scotland. They are the real deal. You know about where they live etc.

Of course I can relate to being a cynic and agree that many will be jumping on the trend to make money.

Unfortunately around these parts it’s impossible these days to get a huge heaped trailer of hardwood logs for £50. The trend towards wood burning stoves has increased the price of wood to £50 for a paltry builders bag of them. I buy smokeless fuel because it’s a cheaper option. I buy the smokeless fuel from the same person I have done for about forty years though. As an aside he’s had a bumper year this year due to a colder winter!

However I will pay more for food that I know for sure is locally and independently produced.

 

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Just now, Economic Exile said:

I can only comment about the farmers markets in my low population area of Scotland. They are the real deal. You know about where they live etc.

Of course I can relate to being a cynic and agree that many will be jumping on the trend to make money.

Unfortunately around these parts it’s impossible these days to get a huge heaped trailer of hardwood logs for £50. The trend towards wood burning stoves has increased the price of wood to £50 for a paltry builders bag of them. I buy smokeless fuel because it’s a cheaper option. I buy the smokeless fuel from the same person I have done for about forty years though. As an aside he’s had a bumper year this year due to a colder winter!

However I will pay more for food that I know for sure is locally and independently produced.

 

It is totally dependent on where you are I guess. In my little neck of the woods in Yorkshire, there are no farmers markets. You go straight to source or at the worst the local butcher and veg shop.  

Pin londonistan, it seems that they are full of desperate people trying to offload stuff with twee labels. When you quiz them about the stuff they are selling, they squirm. 

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26 minutes ago, One percent said:

I walked up the east side of Whitby this morning.  Sun shining, very few tourists, bells ringing from st Mary’s.  Lovely it was. 

It may well be. 

My local church bell (singular) at 7am on a Sunday morning is anything but melodic.

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9 minutes ago, One percent said:

It is totally dependent on where you are I guess. In my little neck of the woods in Yorkshire, there are no farmers markets. You go straight to source or at the worst the local butcher and veg shop.  

Pin londonistan, it seems that they are full of desperate people trying to offload stuff with twee labels. When you quiz them about the stuff they are selling, they squirm. 

Agreed. Different areas in the uk are doing their own thing.

I’m surprised that Yorkshire farmers and independent producers aren’t fighting back against corporations. Lots of lovely food will be home produced in Yorkshire. I’m certain of that.

Perhaps it all is a part of globalisation and destruction of small people?

In Dumfries & Galloway we are a lowly populated area and a handful of local producers have been promoting farmers markets for over ten years.

My personal regular purchases are local honey, home made bread, locally made preserves/relishes and locally grown potatoes and veg. Occasionally I’ll splash out and buy some lamb but I need to feel flush when I do that!

However if I went to a farmers market and I was unsure about their produce they wouldn’t get a penny from me.

Unfortunately there are always unscrupulous folk who will try to make money from a trend. IMO a current trend is people desiring food that hasn’t been mass produced.

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2 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

Agreed. Different areas in the uk are doing their own thing.

I’m surprised that Yorkshire farmers and independent producers aren’t fighting back against corporations. Lots of lovely food will be home produced in Yorkshire. I’m certain of that.

Perhaps it all is a part of globalisation and destruction of small people?

In Dumfries & Galloway we are a lowly populated area and a handful of local producers have been promoting farmers markets for over ten years.

My personal regular purchases are local honey, home made bread, locally made preserves/relishes and locally grown potatoes and veg. Occasionally I’ll splash out and buy some lamb but I need to feel flush when I do that!

However if I went to a farmers market and I was unsure about their produce they wouldn’t get a penny from me.

Unfortunately there are always unscrupulous folk who will try to make money from a trend. IMO a current trend is people desiring food that hasn’t been mass produced.

There are farm shops (not many) where you can buy a bag of spuds and suchlike. My neighbour, long gone, had hives on the moors. Heather honey.  The best I have ever had. 

The local butchers are fab and work closely with local farmers. 

I guess there is no real need. 

There was a market in the old market square but it has been overrun with tat, nothing about food anymore. 

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

There are farm shops (not many) where you can buy a bag of spuds and suchlike. My neighbour, long gone, had hives on the moors. Heather honey.  The best I have ever had. 

The local butchers are fab and work closely with local farmers. 

I guess there is no real need. 

There was a market in the old market square but it has been overrun with tat, nothing about food anymore. 

IME a lot of folk want stuff cheap.

For example, I’ve regularly paid over £5, nearer £10, for locally produced raw honey. Often people tell me I’m daft because I can buy a jar of honey in Aldi etc for under £1. Its is not the same though, most definitely not. I’m sure @sarahbellwould agree!

If I was better off I would spend more at the farmers markets in my region. They’re sound trustworthy folk who have been around for years.

Yes agree that markets selling mass produced tat are uninspiring!

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

IME a lot of folk want stuff cheap.

For example, I’ve regularly paid over £5, nearer £10, for locally produced raw honey. Often people tell me I’m daft because I can buy a jar of honey in Aldi etc for under £1. Its is not the same though, most definitely not. I’m sure @sarahbellwould agree!

If I was better off I would spend more at the farmers markets in my region. They’re sound trustworthy folk who have been around for years.

Yes agree that markets selling mass produced tat are uninspiring!

 

 

 

👍

proper home produced honey is not cheap. Agree though, if you can find it, it is worth it 

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