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sarahbell

Early retirement teachers

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http://www.theoldhamtimes.co.uk/news/16179321.Saddleworth_teacher_turned_artist_stages_solo_exhibition/

 

FOR Saddleworth School teacher turned artist Steve Capper, everything came into focus when he took early retirement at 52.

During 30 years as a secondary school art teacher, bringing up a family and running a commercial pottery, he didn’t have much time for painting.

But chalking up an end to his career was a fresh canvas for Steve, now aged 74, from Delph, 

 

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3 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

http://www.theoldhamtimes.co.uk/news/16179321.Saddleworth_teacher_turned_artist_stages_solo_exhibition/

 

FOR Saddleworth School teacher turned artist Steve Capper, everything came into focus when he took early retirement at 52.

During 30 years as a secondary school art teacher, bringing up a family and running a commercial pottery, he didn’t have much time for painting.

But chalking up an end to his career was a fresh canvas for Steve, now aged 74, from Delph, 

 

Ah, the good old days. Doesn’t happen anymore. 

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6 hours ago, 201p said:

Good on him. If life gives you the opportunity - take it.

Agreed.

 

Me, I'm mastering the art of acting retired whilst I'm employed. Yesterday I spent about an hour walking my dog, 20 mins walking my son to school, 1 hour sleeping and about 1 1/2 hours playing the Xbox. The rest of the day I just lazed about. All this on work time.

I love my job.

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10 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Quite; that used to be reasonably common and would have been so in '96 when he retired.

Now we have what I call job blockers where older people cannot afford to retire and mass unemployment for young people. Madness. 

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6 minutes ago, One percent said:

Now we have what I call job blockers where older people cannot afford to retire and mass unemployment for young people. Madness. 

Agree about the older people unable to retire so blocking the decent jobs but rather than youth unemployment it's mass youth crap employment.  Zero hours contracts, minimum wage, no chance of progression or saving money.  And often with a degree and student debts in tow.

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Just now, Frank Hovis said:

Agree about the older people unable to retire so blocking the decent jobs but rather than youth unemployment it's mass youth crap employment.  Zero hours contracts, minimum wage, no chance of progression or saving money.  And often with a degree and student debts in tow.

Agree Frank.  The workforce in decent jobs is aging. Where I work, the whole team are 50s and 60s. It does not bode well. There is no succession planning in place. 

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16 minutes ago, One percent said:

Now we have what I call job blockers where older people cannot afford to retire and mass unemployment for young people. Madness. 

This angers me a lot

All the job blockers I know (public sector) can afford to retire*. Even now, their retirement income would be greater than a young persons salary.

Factor in the cost savings from not working, children gone and a mortgage paid off (or just a small amount remaining)**, and not needing to buy stuff because it's already bought, and the retired are significantly, better off than young people. In my view, not retiring boils down to two things

1) Greed

2) Needing to be important

* The self employed don't block anyone and I can't speak for someone who has been a shop worker all their lives, for example

** If they haven't paid off the mortgage or reduced it significantly I have little sympathy, make them retire and they can sell the house and downsize

 

Having said all of that, clearing out people when they hit 50 on redundancy as cost saving  is leading to a loss of expertise that is invaluable to the young.

 

Edited by Hopeful

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

Agree Frank.  The workforce in decent jobs is aging. Where I work, the whole team are 50s and 60s. It does not bode well. There is no succession planning in place. 

We appointed a younger person last year.  Even she is forty.

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7 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

This angers me a lot

All the job blockers I know (public sector) can afford to retire*. Even now, their retirement income would be greater than a young persons salary.

Factor in the cost savings from not working, children gone and a mortgage paid off (or just a small amount remaining)**, and not needing to buy stuff because it's already bought, and the retired are significantly, better off than young people. In my view, not retiring boils down to two things

1) Greed

2) Needing to be important

* The self employed don't block anyone and I can't speak for someone who has been a shop worker all their lives, for example

** If they haven't paid off the mortgage or reduced it significantly I have little sympathy, make them retire and they can sell the house and downsize

 

Having said all of that, clearing out people when they hit 50 on redundancy as cost saving  is leading to a loss of expertise that is invaluable to the young.

 

My projected pension is 5.5k a year. Because I chose to work part time, I have been completely hammered. Even though I seem to pay a significant amount for my pension. 

I cant afford to get out. God only knows what happens when I get into my sixties. 

7 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

We appointed a younger person last year.  Even she is forty.

xD

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2 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

This angers me a lot

All the job blockers I know (public sector) can afford to retire*. Even now, their retirement income would be greater than a young persons salary.

Factor in the cost savings from not working, children gone, and a mortgage paid off (or just a small amount remaining)**, not needing to buy stuff because it's already bought, and the retired are significant;ly better off than young people. In my view, not retiring boils down to two things

1) Greed

2) Needing to be important

* The self employed don't block anyone and I can't speak for someone who has been a shop worker all their lives, for example

** If they haven't paid off the mortgage or reduced it significantly I have little sympathy, make them retire and they can sell the house and downssize

 

That would be squarely me and it's mainly (2) but I would say it's:

2) Needing to be useful

 

I have tried retirement and, whilst it's fantastic when the weather is good, the months of cold, wet short days of winter when just kicking around the house are not fun.

 

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7 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

That would be squarely me and it's mainly (2) but I would say it's:

2) Needing to be useful

 

I have tried retirement and, whilst it's fantastic when the weather is good, the months of cold, wet short days of winter when just kicking around the house are not fun.

 

Why not buy a holiday home somewhere nice for the winter?

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10 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

That would be squarely me and it's mainly (2) but I would say it's:

2) Needing to be useful

 

I have tried retirement and, whilst it's fantastic when the weather is good, the months of cold, wet short days of winter when just kicking around the house are not fun.

 

just embrace the SAD and hibernate

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15 minutes ago, One percent said:

My projected pension is 5.5k a year. Because I chose to work part time, I have been completely hammered. Even though I seem to pay a significant amount for my pension. 

I cant afford to get out. God only knows what happens when I get into my sixties. 

xD

Surely that's on top of the state pension though? ~£8k + £5.5k is over £1000 per month which doesn't sound too bad.

 

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13 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

That would be squarely me and it's mainly (2) but I would say it's:

2) Needing to be useful

 

I have tried retirement and, whilst it's fantastic when the weather is good, the months of cold, wet short days of winter when just kicking around the house are not fun.

 

Agree, I toyed with useful instead of important,

but the people I know have never been useful; they just like  their meetings, hospitality and patting each other on their backs at how successful they think they have been.

18 minutes ago, One percent said:

My projected pension is 5.5k a year. Because I chose to work part time, I have been completely hammered. Even though I seem to pay a significant amount for my pension. 

I cant afford to get out. God only knows what happens when I get into my sixties. 

xD

5.5K is a tad more than I will get, which + state and savings and cost savings, I'm hoping will be OK

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Just now, the gardener said:

Surely that's on top of the state pension though? ~£8k + £5.5k is over £1000 per month which doesn't sound too bad.

 

When I’m 67, unless they move the goalpost again.  I don’t want to wait until nearly 70 to retire and neither does my employer I would suspect 

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2 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

Agree, I toyed with useful instead of important,

but the people I know have never been useful; they just like  their meetings, hospitality and patting each other on their backs at how successful they think they have been.

5.5K is a tad more than I will get, which + state and savings and cost savings, I'm hoping will be OK

See my above post...  I don’t want to be nearly 70. 

Bastards. 

Must be off now, get ready to face the public transport that is London. 

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

See my above post...  I don’t want to be nearly 70. 

Bastards. 

Must be off now, get ready to face the public transport that is London. 

They're bastards, yes

12 years until I collect, road kill until then xD

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17 minutes ago, One percent said:

We must be the same age. :)

when I first started, I could take the full pension at 55. 

Bastards. 

Yes,

I always planned to 'get out' at 50 but not to stop working. I got out at 52. In my whole 'career' I only had three years as an employee, as I was always on fellowships etc with occasional short periods of 'unemployment' in between. I haven't stopped working and should make it through to 'retirement' on a much reduced income, but much happier.

I have left behind a load of people that are just turning up to work to collect money and hoping they will reach retirement and their pension before dying. It's shifting goalposts and not trusting anyone that is why I always had a plan to get out at 50 and take my chances.

 

Edited by Hopeful

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2 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

I have tried retirement and, whilst it's fantastic when the weather is good, the months of cold, wet short days of winter when just kicking around the house are not fun.

This.

As I walked to work today, a heavy shower came on, with ice cold wind and it was dark as well - this was at 10am.

And the houses are getting smaller and more expensive. So in the shite weather most retired folk will be sitting in a small room in their small house.

Fuck that.

I'd much rather even have a room in a shared house somewhere sunny and beautiful, rather that be sitting by myself in a £250K 3 bed semi in the suburbs of rainy Belfast.

Edited by JoeDavola

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3 hours ago, One percent said:

Agree Frank.  The workforce in decent jobs is aging. Where I work, the whole team are 50s and 60s. It does not bode well. There is no succession planning in place. 

I think the succession planning is to import people from abroad. I can sort of understand why some people cacked themselves over Brexit. 

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