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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5652743/Schools-removing-analogue-clocks-exams-teenagers-tell-time.html

Analogue clocks will be removed from exam halls and replaced with digital ones because teenagers are unable to tell the time, claim head teachers.

Digital devices will be installed into exam halls because GCSE and A-level students complained that they were unable to read the correct time.



Words fail.  Surely it is much easier to use a traditional clock when working out how much time you have left in an exam?  

The result of shit parenting again.  I remember my parents spending time (no pun intended) with me and me doing the same with my kids. Bet most parents think it is the job of the school, just like potty training. 

Dear god. 

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, One percent said:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5652743/Schools-removing-analogue-clocks-exams-teenagers-tell-time.html

Analogue clocks will be removed from exam halls and replaced with digital ones because teenagers are unable to tell the time, claim head teachers.

Digital devices will be installed into exam halls because GCSE and A-level students complained that they were unable to read the correct time.



Words fail.  Surely it is much easier to use a traditional clock when working out how much time you have left in an exam?  

The result of shit parenting again.  I remember my parents spending time (no pun intended) with me and me doing the same with my kids. Bet most parents think it is the job of the school, just like potty training. 

Dear god. 

 

Studies have shown that it is much quicker for the brain to read and understand an analogue clock than a digital clock

A bizarre decision

 

Edited by Hopeful

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8 minutes ago, One percent said:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5652743/Schools-removing-analogue-clocks-exams-teenagers-tell-time.html

Analogue clocks will be removed from exam halls and replaced with digital ones because teenagers are unable to tell the time, claim head teachers.

 

Bloody hell! O.o It's as if pupils and students are trying to find any minute (no pun intended ;) ) angle to complain about in an exam setting to give them any advantage. Next they'll be wanting the exam vigilators (spl??) to actually give them the answers!

This would be another good contender for 'best tread title' btw. :)

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4 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

 

Studies have shown that it is much quicker for the brain to read and understand an analogue clock than a digital clock

A bizarre decision

 

I think the key is that it is slightly harder to learn. Much easier to read though as you say.  I find with digital, I’m having to interpret it whereby with analog, I just instinctively know with a glance. 

 

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10 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

 

Studies have shown that it is much quicker for the brain to read and understand an analogue clock than a digital clock

A bizarre decision

 

Aircraft cockpits go a long way to reproducing the features of old analogue instruments, if you design it right one quick glance down and you can see if any dial is off-centre form a nominal reading and any indicator in an unexpected position stands out a mile, old car temp / oil the same - 12 o'clock on the temp/oil - all ok. Cleverest instrument is the barbers pole  - getting the glide slope right on landing the spinning poles give the effect of falling forward or back and automatically cue the pilot's responses to adjust the stick accordingly.

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3 minutes ago, One percent said:

I think the key is that it is slightly harder to learn. Much easier to read though as you say.  I find with digital, I’m having to interpret it whereby with analog, I just instinctively know with a glance. 

 

I find the opposite and also struggle to see why it would be quicker to read an analog clock.

Actually, I don't have a problem with this decision, it isn't surprising - how many school-children can say how many ounces are in a kilogram (I have no idea) or litres in a gallon (I think it's 4.4 without looking but that might be wrong). Or pennies in a florin?

Surely analog clocks are a thing of the past. They do look nice on clock towers and on the front of buildings, though. Buildings from a point in our history where it's entirely appropriate.

 

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3 minutes ago, DTMark said:

I find the opposite and also struggle to see why it would be quicker to read an analog clock.

Actually, I don't have a problem with this decision, it isn't surprising - how many school-children can say how many ounces are in a kilogram (I have no idea) or litres in a gallon (I think it's 4.4 without looking but that might be wrong). Or pennies in a florin?

Surely analog clocks are a thing of the past. They do look nice on clock towers and on the front of buildings, though. Buildings from a point in our history where it's entirely appropriate.

 

Interesting point about them being a thing of the past. I’m not sure. How many people wear a digital watch?  Most people (if they still wear one) seem to go for a traditional wrist watch. 

I feel they are easier to read.  A bit like a pie chart, rather than a bar chart.  The proportions are easier to see, so you instinctively know how much of the hour is left.  

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8 minutes ago, DTMark said:

I find the opposite and also struggle to see why it would be quicker to read an analog clock.

Actually, I don't have a problem with this decision, it isn't surprising - how many school-children can say how many ounces are in a kilogram (I have no idea) or litres in a gallon (I think it's 4.4 without looking but that might be wrong). Or pennies in a florin?

Surely analog clocks are a thing of the past. They do look nice on clock towers and on the front of buildings, though. Buildings from a point in our history where it's entirely appropriate.

 

The brain can process images must faster than text though - if the layout is right you can  process much more information - about 60,000 times faster for instant recognition. You can also screw with the brain's processing pretty easily of you want to too, that test with coloured writing and conflicting colour names being a  good example.

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6 minutes ago, One percent said:

Interesting point about them being a thing of the past. I’m not sure. How many people wear a digital watch?  Most people (if they still wear one) seem to go for a traditional wrist watch. 

That's the point, though. Nobody wears watches. They read the time from their mobile phone which unless they've chosen otherwise assuming the phone can do it, will be a digital display.

Albeit we're not yet at the point where there is no value in being able to read an analog clock.

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Just now, DTMark said:

That's the point, though. Nobody wears watches. They read the time from their mobile phone which unless they've chosen otherwise assuming the phone can do it, will be a digital display.

Albeit we're not yet at the point where there is no value in being able to read an analog clock.

I feel a poll coming on :)  can we add one to this @spunko2010?  Who wears a digital, an analog, or no watch. 

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Just now, One percent said:

I feel a poll coming on :)  can we add one to this @spunko2010?  Who wears a digital, an analog, or no watch. 

Ah, but here, we're not talking about mostly thirty and forty-something people, we're talking about children. Results would, I feel, be very different.

Actually there are nearly 4.6 litres to a gallon. Thankfully, I didn't need to know that to pass an exam. OK, that stretches the analogy a bit, but still..

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, DTMark said:

That's the point, though. Nobody wears watches. They read the time from their mobile phone which unless they've chosen otherwise assuming the phone can do it, will be a digital display.

Albeit we're not yet at the point where there is no value in being able to read an analog clock.

But, if the exam ends at 11 o'clock you have to do mental gymnastics to convert 10:37 to either 23 minutes left or 23 minutes to 11

That takes time

So by removing analogue clocks you are discriminating against people that might have learned to read analogue to give an advantage in life,

Which is typical discrimination against the clever

Why not just give everyone a pass and forget the exam. It'd be so much fairer

Edited by Hopeful

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Watches still quite popular with the boys according to daughter and for exams most wear a watch so they don't have to refer to the wall clock.

 

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29 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

But, if the exam ends at 11 o'clock you have to do mental gymnastics to convert 10:37 to either 23 minutes left or 23 minutes to 11

That takes time

So by removing analogue clocks you are discriminating against people that might have learned to read analogue to give an advantage in life,

Which is typical discrimination against the clever

Why not just give everyone a pass and forget the exam. It'd be so much fairer

They already do. The stories I could tell. 

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56 minutes ago, DTMark said:

I find the opposite and also struggle to see why it would be quicker to read an analog clock.

Actually, I don't have a problem with this decision, it isn't surprising - how many school-children can say how many ounces are in a kilogram (I have no idea) or litres in a gallon (I think it's 4.4 without looking but that might be wrong). Or pennies in a florin?

Surely analog clocks are a thing of the past. They do look nice on clock towers and on the front of buildings, though. Buildings from a point in our history where it's entirely appropriate.

 

I tend to agree. Pining after erstwhile measurements I find a bit irritating. Let's have standardisation for everything, including Kilometers, Celsius and Kilograms. It's just so much easier to use.

 

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3 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

I tend to agree. Pining after erstwhile measurements I find a bit irritating. Let's have standardisation for everything, including Kilometers, Celsius and Kilograms. It's just so much easier to use.

 

Why is easier better?

It's not anyway "pining", it's what's more useful and above all meaningful. 

  • In science where measurements are frequent and used for the basis of calculations it's the base ten measures all the way
  • In cooking it's  teaspoonfuls, half pints, ounces
  • For people it's feet and inches, stones and pounds, and barleycorns (shoe sizes) as I illustrated to someone who was trying to suggest that I was living in the past when she said she oinly ever used metric and that's all that she was taught in school.  So I asked her: "How tall are you? How much do you weigh? What is your shoe size?"  All given in imperial.  If you say someone is a "six footer" that has meaning in a way that "one point whatever metres" does not.

I particularly like the temperature scale for weather where because we expect scales to run 0 - 100 centigrade is usally used for the cold temperatures (minus 2 overnight) whereas fahrenheit is used for the high ones (glorious day today - up in the 80s).

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Why is easier better?

It's not anyway "pining", it's what's more useful and above all meaningful. 

  • In science where measurements are frequent and used for the basis of calculations it's the base ten measures all the way
  • In cooking it's  teaspoonfuls, half pints, ounces
  • For people it's feet and inches, stones and pounds, and barleycorns (shoe sizes) as I illustrated to someone who was trying to suggest that I was living in the past when she said she oinly ever used metric and that's all that she was taught in school.  So I asked her: "How tall are you? How much do you weigh? What is your shoe size?"  All given in imperial.  If you say someone is a "six footer" that has meaning in a way that "one point whatever metres" does not.

I particularly like the temperature scale for weather where because we expect scales to run 0 - 100 centigrade is usally used for the cold temperatures (minus 2 overnight) whereas fahrenheit is used for the high ones (glorious day today - up in the 80s).

I grew up selling loose stuff in lbs and oz, and I can still judge the weight of stuff very accurately in imperial whether a bag of nails or a bag of spuds

In my work I made up molar solutions etc, chemicals always weighed in metric, obviously

If you ask me to measure out 100g of glucose, I'd get a very good approximation without scales

If you asked me to weight out 100g of sugar, I'd be way off (there was a pun there)

And vice versa

For work its metric and in the kitchen it's imperial, and I'm spot on with both in their respective environments.

Same with measurements. I could approximate the length of a snake in cm, but the dining room table in feet and inches.

 

 

Edited by Hopeful

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56 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

But, if the exam ends at 11 o'clock you have to do mental gymnastics to convert 10:37 to either 23 minutes left or 23 minutes to 11

That takes time

Perhaps it's because I've always preferred digital clocks and found them easier to read, that 10:37 is immediately translated to "23 minutes to 11" in my head. I don't need to do the maths to work that out any more than I needed to think to any level of detail to type this out - using digital clocks and writing English is an intuitive skill.

If I had to write the above in Italian it would take slightly longer as it is not an intuitive skill. Like reading an analog clock.

I shall concede that I do see why some people find it easier to work with an analog clock but then it's about what you grew up with.. even when I had a watch it was a digital watch. Never had an analog one.

There is one on the wall in the kitchen but I use the timer on my phone to time things as if accuracy is important I can't be arsed to try to work out precisely where the minute hand is and then do a mental map of what the clock will look like when the time I need to measure has ended, doing the mapping back and forth.

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3 minutes ago, DTMark said:

Perhaps it's because I've always preferred digital clocks and found them easier to read, that 10:37 is immediately translated to "23 minutes to 11" in my head. I don't need to do the maths to work that out any more than I needed to think to any level of detail to type this out - using digital clocks and writing English is an intuitive skill.

If I had to write the above in Italian it would take slightly longer as it is not an intuitive skill. Like reading an analog clock.

I shall concede that I do see why some people find it easier to work with an analog clock but then it's about what you grew up with.. even when I had a watch it was a digital watch. Never had an analog one.

There is one on the wall in the kitchen but I use the timer on my phone to time things as if accuracy is important I can't be arsed to try to work out precisely where the minute hand is and then do a mental map of what the clock will look like when the time I need to measure has ended, doing the mapping back and forth.

Yup.

Something is either intuitive or it's not and that depends with what you grew up.  I've only ever had one digital watch and didn't like not being able to tell the time at a glance without raising my arm but instead having to look more closely at it to read the digits.

Similarly some people insist on having their digital clocks set to 24 hour because that's how they view the day.

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20 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Why is easier better?

It's not anyway "pining", it's what's more useful and above all meaningful. 

  • In science where measurements are frequent and used for the basis of calculations it's the base ten measures all the way
  • In cooking it's  teaspoonfuls, half pints, ounces
  • For people it's feet and inches, stones and pounds, and barleycorns (shoe sizes) as I illustrated to someone who was trying to suggest that I was living in the past when she said she oinly ever used metric and that's all that she was taught in school.  So I asked her: "How tall are you? How much do you weigh? What is your shoe size?"  All given in imperial.  If you say someone is a "six footer" that has meaning in a way that "one point whatever metres" does not.

I particularly like the temperature scale for weather where because we expect scales to run 0 - 100 centigrade is usally used for the cold temperatures (minus 2 overnight) whereas fahrenheit is used for the high ones (glorious day today - up in the 80s).

I agree with all of the above.

And for fans of cricket (and other odd old measurements) - 

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/story/89685.html

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8 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

Same with measurements. I could approximate the length of a snake in cm, but the dining room table in feet and inches.

 

Yet penises are always imperial. Even, I'm prepared to guess, among the yoof.

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5 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

I agree with all of the above.

And for fans of cricket (and other odd old measurements) - 

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/story/89685.html

Love it!

 

Quote

The ell's subdivision into 16 nails of 2 and 13/16 inches each probably accounts for the size of the early wicket. According to the "Code of 1744" "Ye Stumps must be 22 inches long, and ye Bail 6 inches". P.F. Thomas (who wrote under the pseudonymous H.P.-T.) convincingly argues that these figures are a rounding off by the gentlemen of London of the earlier rustic measurement of 8 nails by 2 nails, which would give a wicket of 22 and 1/2 by 5 and 5/8 inches.

 

 

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It will surely lead to disaster.  You need to be able to read to read a digital clock, but the traditional clock face can be read by the illiterate (innumerate).  We'll have a new pile of 'not fair'.

[Well, there aren't that many illiterate young any more, but the new way is all about inventing things to be moral about on other's behalf]

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