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DTMark

Homeserve insurance

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My mother has been going through the accounts of my late father and has come across payments to a thing called 'Homeserve' which date back more than a decade.

A quick Google turns up this article:

Homeserve cover not necessary

I asked her to photograph and send me the "policy document" and she sent this:

http://www.dtmark.info/files/homeserve.jpg

The house has a really odd form of central heating - hot air which is vented through ductwork in the house. Like having a fan heater in every room. It doesn't have any radiators.

It is an end-terrace and the manhole cover for accessing the sewers is in her back garden. Every few years the water company has to access it to remove nappies and other rubbish that have caused a blockage thanks to someone else in the same street flushing them down the toilet. Nice. If this isn't done promptly, the sewage will overflow the ducting and begin to spill into the garden. As I understand it however this is covered by buildings insurance, which she already has, separately. And that has never actually happened. Yet.

Just wanted to check that my suspicions - that this is indeed as described in the Telegraph article - and should be cancelled outright.

In her opening conversation the circa £30 a month has become £30 a quarter but I can't see much point in having this policy. Thanks!

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Almost certainly unnecessary.

If the sewer is shared than it is their responsibility anyway.

Lots of misselling for Homeserve -- tell them that your dad never agreed to this and try to get a refund (might not be worth the bother).

As a general rule, don't get insurance for anything that you could actually afford to fix/replace if the 'bad thing' happened.

 

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41 minutes ago, DTMark said:

The house has a really odd form of central heating - hot air which is vented through ductwork in the house. Like having a fan heater in every room. It doesn't have any radiators.

 

I have this.  It's called warm air heating. It's really rubbish but I understand it's popular in the United States.

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Homeserve are actually ok. They cover taps, leaks from the bog etc. Ive called them out several times.

If the problem is based around the workings of pipework belonging to a local authority etc then no form of insurance would be worth it.

For your blocked drain, leaking bog, or broken pipe, id say its worth it. They also are very open to negotiation. I had a years worth off of them for 85p a month. I'm now paying 4.75 a  month i think.

Some contents insurance will have some elements of this included but ive never put them to the test.

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2 hours ago, karelian said:

I have this.  It's called warm air heating. It's really rubbish but I understand it's popular in the United States.

Only seen in  two houses in my life - one in the 70's and one in the 90's, though suspect the 90's one was put in during the 70's too.  Modern fan design and computational fluid dynamics design for  the ducting might be goer again.

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4 hours ago, onlyme said:

Only seen in  two houses in my life - one in the 70's and one in the 90's, though suspect the 90's one was put in during the 70's too.  Modern fan design and computational fluid dynamics design for  the ducting might be goer again.

Harlow, Essex. 1960s new town.

The central unit broke and they had difficulty getting it replaced once.

They intended to replace with radiators until they found out how much it would cost. There was one particular reason, and I can't recall what it was, that made this logistically very difficult to do.

It makes the air on the room very dry. But on the other hand it heats up rooms very fast. The ones downstairs, where the thing making the heat is.

If you want the upstairs to be warm you have to part-close the vents downstairs or it's like sitting in an oven.

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I never trust warranty/insurance companies and a quick read of the Terms and Conditions I'd wager will mean they don't cover this "non standard" type of heating anyway - can you check? The reviews of them are quite good though, so I suppose if you don't want the ball-ache of organising a plumber and have a standard system and want to pay monthly they have their use. Personally I would just put aside money every month.

 

 

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