• Welcome to DOSBODS

    Please consider creating a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

Sign in to follow this  

Recommended Posts

So I just had the TV on in the background and I thought that I heard an advert for an adopt an orca charity. Surely not? How can you adopt an orca? Do they need adopting in the first place? Did anyone ask them? Do they pop around for dinner once adopted and do you become liable for their student loans?

I mean, are orcas so vulnerable that they need people adopting them?

I went on google to have a look and was surprised to find not just one charity allowing you to adopt an orca but several. There appears to be specific orca adopting charities. Several of the major wildlife charities also have orca adopting schemes - do you need to be a non-hideously white cis-neutral Guaridan reading, Steptoe supporting couple to adopt?

Seems, for your cash, you get a photo of an orca. Not sure what else you get.

OK, rant over - surely this is just a means of funding those marine biologists whom, to me, appear to have great lives, sailing around the world, scuba-diving, appearing on wildlife documentaries, etc, rather than practically helping your average orca?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

At least Orcas exist.

Do you think people would support a 'Adopt an Ork' charity?

Probably got more chance with 'adopt a nork' charity.

Put me down for a couple.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

So I just had the TV on in the background and I thought that I heard an advert for an adopt an orca charity. Surely not? How can you adopt an orca? Do they need adopting in the first place? Did anyone ask them? Do they pop around for dinner once adopted and do you become liable for their student loans?

I mean, are orcas so vulnerable that they need people adopting them?

I went on google to have a look and was surprised to find not just one charity allowing you to adopt an orca but several. There appears to be specific orca adopting charities. Several of the major wildlife charities also have orca adopting schemes - do you need to be a non-hideously white cis-neutral Guaridan reading, Steptoe supporting couple to adopt?

Seems, for your cash, you get a photo of an orca. Not sure what else you get.

OK, rant over - surely this is just a means of funding those marine biologists whom, to me, appear to have great lives, sailing around the world, scuba-diving, appearing on wildlife documentaries, etc, rather than practically helping your average orca?

 

If you adopt an orca, does that mean you get a bit of one?

 

tuna-700x500.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

Of course they don't seem to go into much detail about exactly where the money goes.

No donate and adopt a cod or herring yet.  I expect it's size discrimination.

Edited by twocents

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, One percent said:

I’ve got a goldfish bowl, I’ll take two in. 

I think one of my Koi is pregnant - £50 and I will let you name it and send a photo.

Strictly limited to the first 50 applicants.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

I think one of my Koi is pregnant - £50 and I will let you name it and send a photo.

Strictly limited to the first 50 applicants.

Once their tied in try an annual or monthly subscription and you will keep them updated with its progress. Might be an idea to set up a website and put some photographs of it. Update them regularly and introduce its friends to keep their interest.

We were given a subscription to a donkey sanctuary as a Christmas present. That's what they did. I doubt the sanctuary had a donkey, just pictures on a website!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, sleepwello'nights said:

Once their tied in try an annual or monthly subscription and you will keep them updated with its progress. Might be an idea to set up a website and put some photographs of it. Update them regularly and introduce its friends to keep their interest.

We were given a subscription to a donkey sanctuary as a Christmas present. That's what they did. I doubt the sanctuary had a donkey, just pictures on a website!

Well, that says a lot about what whoever gave it to you thinks of you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Byron said:

Well, that says a lot about what whoever gave it to you thinks of you.

Yeah, that's not a present unless you've asked for it - it's someone giving to charity and not buying you a present. They get the warm glow of doing something good and you get to feel bad for being annoyed that you didn't get a present. Wankers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I remember a few years ago watching I'm A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here and David Guest was one of the contestants.  I think then that the celebs did do it for a charity.  Anyway, one of the other D-listers asked him which charity he was supporting and he replied "young Chinese girls with herpes".  It really made me laugh.  However, I daren't google it as it could actually exist.

:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Frank Hovis
      I can't honestly say that I'm surprised; disappointed maybe.  The failure to pay taxes continues a Bono theme.
      Shame of the Bono charity bullies: Probe forces rock star's foundation to come clean about abuse of staff in South Africa
      U2 singer's ONE charity subjected staff to a 'toxic' culture of bullying and abuse  Executive was demoted after refusing to have sex with elderly Tanzanian MP  UK manager left a 'broken woman' after 18 months of belittling and humiliation  Charity also failed to pay taxes despite campaigning fiercely against tax evasion  Bono says he is 'deeply sorry' and has promised to meet victims in person  NGO backed by David Cameron and Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg among others  
      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5486121/Bonos-ONE-charity-shame-South-Africa-staff-abuse-claims.html
    • By Zanu Bob
      This comment from Masked Tulip reminded of one of my personal bete noires
      ' I read something a few months back looking at the top charities in the UK and, IIRC, most were only spending about 40% of charitable income at most - the other 60% going on running costs - i.e. salaries and pensions. '
       
      https://www.thirdsector.co.uk/charity-pay-study-2017-highest-earners/special-report/article/1427306
      ' The British Red Cross also paid its highest earner £173,000, about £30,000 less than in the 2015 study. Fourteen of the top 100 charities paid their highest earners more than £300,000, compared with 12 in 2015. Thirty-seven charities paid more than £200,000, compared with 32 in the 2015 study. But some charities paid their highest earners considerably less than in previous years. The highest-paid employee at the London Clinic earned between £540,000 and £550,000, compared with £850,000 to £860,000 in the 2015 study. The salary awarded to the highest-paid employee at St Andrew's Healthcare has fallen by more than £300,000 since the 2015 study.
       
      The study also includes the total number of staff in each organisation who were paid more than £60,000. Charities are required to state in their annual accounts how many employees earn above this amount. Save the Children International employed the highest number of staff earning above £60,000 (375), and was followed by the British Council with 339. In the top 100, the International Rescue Committee had the fewest employees earning more than £60,000, paying just two more than this amount.
      But others in the sector urge restraint over senior executive pay levels. Stella Smith, a governance consultant and Third Sector columnist, says that it is not always clear what special qualities senior manager have that justify such salaries, and neither is there any evidence that over time high pay results in better performance. She believes it is unwise for organisations to become so dependent on individual staff members that they feel they have to pay them substantial amounts.
      "If charities don't have enough skilled people, surely it would make more sense to invest in developing their staff instead of paying senior managers more," she says.
      https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/charities-in-pound5bn-pensions-deficit-v3mbf7wvxzf
      'SOME of the UK’s best known charities are facing potentially catastrophic deficits in their pension funds with the top 40 having a combined £5.5bn black hole in their accounts.
      There are fears that charities will be forced to use public donations to plug the gaps in their funds.
      The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (GDBA) received more than £60m from the public in its last financial year, but more than 10% of that amount was used to pay off the pension fund deficit of £22m.'
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.