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Wahoo

How to build an Oak Framed Garage / workshop for £6000

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I thought the DOSBODS community might like to see my latest project with costings. I decided years ago to drop the 'so-called' experts having been ripped off with shoddy work.

 

The workshop is just under 30 square metres and under 4 metres high. 

 

Firstly dig square foundations to about 600cm and fill with concrete. I used ready-mix for this.  When dry the concrete base is 4 inches thick with damp proof membrane and wire mesh inside. It took two days to mix and pour by hand. Chuck a small handfull of 'furry-muff' (Polyester fibers) into each concrete mixer load. This helps to prevent cracking. The mix is about 8 to 1 concrete gravel to cement. 

 

Cost for base £8001949850451_OakFramedGarage582.thumb.jpg.7ecdf56b9beac45dd2f7c49ed8eb1f38.jpg1519130294_OakFramedGarage586.thumb.jpg.bb39211c992785eb38526e440e189d0f.jpg

Oak Framed Garage 585.jpg

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When the base is dry build a three sided wall of either bricks or blockwork for the oak to sit on. I used blocks as quicker to put down and I don't give a rats-arse what it looks like. 😂

Measure the diagonals...if they are the same the structure is square.

 

Next buy some oak. I used a local saw mill in Cornwall. The uprights are 8 inch square and the beams 8 x 6. The oak sitting on the blockwork is 8 x 4.

It weighs a fecken ton...well, actually just under 4 tons. 

 

The back posts are 1 meter high. The front posts 2.1 metres.  You need to cut tenon joints on the top of each upright.

Green oak is very soft and easy to cut.

Cost of blocks £100

Cost of Oak £2300

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The pieces of 8 x 4 sitting on the little wall need to be jointed into the uprights. Cutting the square holes into these massive upright beams is difficult. I use a chain morticer. It's like a chainsaw that plunges into the oak and cuts a square hole. You need to drill 18 mm holes through these joints for the oak pegs which will clamp the structure together when assembled.

You also need to cut curved braces for the corners. The are cut on a band saw and the jointed ends are a simple half-joint. You must make certain that each end of the brace joints make an accurate 90 degree right angle, because they will pull the massive oak beams square when the pegs are driven through.

That's me....big fat gut and fag.  Heaven.

Cost of chain morticer £1200 !!!   But I can sell it again for £900

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The curved braces are really important in supporting the massive beams. Each joint has two seasoned oak pegs. The pegs are octagonal shaped and not round. The holes in the joints are slightly off-set by 2 - 3 mm. When you drive the peg in using a lump-hammer it pulls the joint together and makes it absolutely solid.

The pegs absorb water from the green oak and swell. Also they form a slight arch inside the joint because of the off-set holes. Each peg will take 3 tons before it will shear.

It's really satisfying hammering the pegs home. I usually imagine some fecken cnut-arsed politician as I smack-em.

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Once the 6 large uprights and 3 smaller uprights were in place and braced together, the next job was to get the 3 tie-beams into position. These were massive 4 metre bastards and weighed a ton. A mate of mine helped. We lifted the into position using a tractor and they fortunately dropped into place. Not only do they joint into the tenons on the top of the uprights, but they also attach to the curved braces. 

I was shitting myself having these beams above me on a tractor...and such a relief when they were in position.

The final frame is solid and ready for the roof.

You get some amazing sunsets here...that's a buzzard flying near the wind-turbine.

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I decided to cut the rafters from tanalised 4 x 2.  You need to be a rocket-scientists to cut rafters with birds-mouths and plumb lines first time. Fortunately I'm a rocket-scientists.😁

Actually I cheated and found this amazing website. Put the dimensions of the building in and you get exact rafter sizes and where to cut and at what angle etc. If you want to build a man-cave like this...or indeed a shed...use this site. My rafters fitted perfectly first time.

https://www.blocklayer.com/roof/rafter.aspx

 

The guy or lassie who designed this is an absolute genius. I've gone for a hipped roof and cutting compound mitres is impossible. But using this site you print out a paper template, fold it around the rafter and cut the shape. Bingo...a perfect fit.

The main rafters in the middle are called common rafters. They sit on the oak by nailed birds-mouths, and are also nailed  into the ridge board at the top.

Then I ran 4 hipped rafters to each corner of the oak frame. These were the most difficult. 

Health and safety is VERY important. Don't balance on an oak beam. Make sure you wear a hard hat and harness.  Remember...working well means working safely....oh fuck-off 😁

 

Cost of rafters, tile battens and stud-work  £790

 

 

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Edited by Wahoo
crap spelling

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2 minutes ago, Wahoo said:

I decided to cut the rafters from tanalised 4 x 2.  You need to be a rocket-scientists to cut rafters with birds-mouths and plumb lines first time. Fortunately I'm a rocket-scientists.😁

Actually I cheated and found this amazing website. Put the dimensions of the building in and you get exact rafter sizes and where to cut and at what angle etc. If you want to build a man-cave like this...or indeed a shed...use this site. My rafters fitted perfectly first time.

https://www.blocklayer.com/roof/rafter.aspx

 

The guy or lassie who designed this is an absolute genius. I've gone for a hipped roof and cutting compound mitres is impossible. But using this site you print out a paper template, fold it around the rafter and cut the shape. Bingo...a perfect fit.

The main rafters in the middle are called common rafters. The sit on the oak by nailed birds-mouths, and are also nailed into nail into the ridge board at the top.

Then I ran 4 hipped rafters to each corner of the oak frame. These were the most difficult. 

Health and safety is VERY important. Don't balance on an oak beam. Make sure you wear a hard hat and harness.  Remember...working well means working safely....oh fuck-off 😁

 

 

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Don’t worry about ‘elf and safety, you are still with us. 

Super impressed with your skills. It’s looking good. 

Now, how many dosbodders can fit in there for a visit? :)

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Thanks folks....nice of you to say.

Yes...have to admit that I've done oak-framing before. Working in wood is my passion. This is the book to buy if you want to do it. Oak framing is simple and hasn't changed for hundreds of years.

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/book-search/title/oak-framed-buildings/author/rupert-newman/

 

If I had my time again I would do it for a living....but I made the mistake of going into the Plantation....took me years to get my freedom back 😁

 

Hope we all meet up this summer.

Thanks for video of rendering Onlyme.....made me think 'Good idea'. 

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This shot shows how the lower rafters are attached to form the 'Cat slide roof' at the back. Each rafter is nailed top and bottom and also bolted to the tails of the upper rafter.

Not sure why they call this a cat slide.

My brother looked after the cat when I went on holiday. I phoned him and he said 'The cat was dead'. I admonished him for being so abrupt. I suggested he said 'The cats on the roof' or something similar.

He apologised for being so abrupt, wished me a great holiday.

As he put down the phone he said...'By the way...Mum's on the roof'.....😻    Boom boom  😁

 

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20 minutes ago, Wahoo said:

This shot shows how the lower rafters are attached to form the 'Cat slide roof' at the back. Each rafter is nailed top and bottom and also bolted to the tails of the upper rafter.

Not sure why they call this a cat slide.

My brother looked after the cat when I went on holiday. I phoned him and he said 'The cat was dead'. I admonished him for being so abrupt. I suggested he said 'The cats on the roof' or something similar.

He apologised for being so abrupt, wished me a great holiday.

As he put down the phone he said...'By the way...Mum's on the roof'.....😻    Boom boom  😁

 

Oakframe_2_001.thumb.jpg.104f19fe73da9e028484a6dc63780ec8.jpg

Are you building from a kit or have you sourced the wood and cut to length etc yourself?

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Not a kit....I've cut every joint by hand. The oak is English and comes from an old traditional sawmill near Bodmin. The owner has tree trunks and cuts them to your dimensions.

The rest of the timber just comes from a local building supplier. 😎

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8 minutes ago, Wahoo said:

Not a kit....I've cut every joint by hand. The oak is English and comes from an old traditional sawmill near Bodmin. The owner has tree trunks and cuts them to your dimensions.

The rest of the timber just comes from a local building supplier. 😎

Even more impressed now. 

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9 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

Do you fancy doing mine? I've had quotes ranging from 25 to 80k. It has a room above but other than that looks very similar. 

If you're serious ....  yes.  Do you want a two bay or bigger? Are you talking about an external oak staircase?  Do you have planning ok?

If you decide to use a local company don't skimp on dimensions. Insist on 200mm square uprights. Some use 150 mm.

I'll teach you the craft at the same time. 😃

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8 minutes ago, Wahoo said:

If you're serious ....  yes.  Do you want a two bay or bigger? Are you talking about an external oak staircase?  Do you have planning ok?

If you decide to use a local company don't skimp on dimensions. Insist on 200mm square uprights. Some use 150 mm.

I'll teach you the craft at the same time. 😃

Yes yes yes and yes! I need to get building regs signed off but I can start the groundwork. It's an open cart double bay with storage above and external staircase. I've found a supplier nearby who cuts to size but the cost is ridiculous of using these kit companies once you start going away from the standard. The reason seems to be I need a floating raft base or something due to a tree nearby with a TPO. 

I'm in Kent so quite a commute from bodmin 😃

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On ‎04‎/‎05‎/‎2018 at 18:00, Wahoo said:

To be continued.....just noticed it's 5.30 and time to meet my mates in the pub. 😂

After reading down to here and looking at the photos I must say I'm really impressed. I'm just adding you to my list of heroes now.

It looks great, and strong as fuck.

Impressed!!

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13 hours ago, Wahoo said:

This shot shows how the lower rafters are attached to form the 'Cat slide roof' at the back. Each rafter is nailed top and bottom and also bolted to the tails of the upper rafter.

Not sure why they call this a cat slide.

My brother looked after the cat when I went on holiday. I phoned him and he said 'The cat was dead'. I admonished him for being so abrupt. I suggested he said 'The cats on the roof' or something similar.

He apologised for being so abrupt, wished me a great holiday.

As he put down the phone he said...'By the way...Mum's on the roof'.....😻    Boom boom  😁

 

Oakframe_2_001.thumb.jpg.104f19fe73da9e028484a6dc63780ec8.jpg

That's now not a shed, a garage or a workshop, that's a home.

Seriously impressed!!

I used to know a guy who made cruck framed buildings using green oak and was impressed with what he did, he had been doing it full time for years though, even more impressed with what you have done there!

Beautiful, thank you for posting it all too, quite inspirational.

 

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28 minutes ago, Carl Fimble said:

After reading down to here and looking at the photos I must say I'm really impressed. I'm just adding you to my list of heroes now.

It looks great, and strong as fuck.

Impressed!!

We must make sure that @Wahoo gets to the island. He wil be able to build additional shelter. 

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1 hour ago, Carl Fimble said:

After reading down to here and looking at the photos I must say I'm really impressed. I'm just adding you to my list of heroes now.

It looks great, and strong as fuck.

Impressed!!

Thanks Carl .... very kind of you to say so. You're right. A bedroom upstairs. Divide downstairs into shower room and kitchen; the other half a small lounge. Put a wood burning stove in the middle for heating and hot water....you've a nice place to live for a fraction of the cost of a starter home.

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1 minute ago, Wahoo said:

Thanks Carl .... very kind of you to say so. You're right. A bedroom upstairs. Divide downstairs into shower room and kitchen; the other half a small lounge. Put a wood burning stove in the middle for heating and hot water....you've a nice place to live for a fraction of the cost of a starter home.

Only the cost of the land and planning permission on top, and kitting it out, it would be lovely too!!

Very impressed anyway, as was Spunko by the sounds of things, maybe keep hold of your chair morticer for another wee while! 

Looking forward to seeing more photos as you finish it off. Are you going to use it as a workshop?

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3 minutes ago, Carl Fimble said:

Only the cost of the land and planning permission on top, and kitting it out, it would be lovely too!!

Very impressed anyway, as was Spunko by the sounds of things, maybe keep hold of your chair morticer for another wee while! 

Looking forward to seeing more photos as you finish it off. Are you going to use it as a workshop?

Put a minaret at the side, say it’s a mosque and planning permission is guaranteed   

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