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spygirl

Maia, Logan and Danish...

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From the article 

 

BBC One's Back to School with Mum & Dad told the stories of three primary school pupils, aged between seven and nine, who had been excluded from their own schools over violent outbursts, disruptive behaviour and low attendance.


Traditionally, piss poor behaviour didn’t start before secondary 

 

then we have

Nine-year-old Danish was forced to leave four schools in just three years because of his violent behaviour. He would lash out at teachers when they told him what to do and had even had to be physically restrained by staff.

Not surprised. Just what were they thinking, calling him after a sweet cake like snack. 

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It is all cod-psychology.  Sure, there's a reason, but there's always a reason -- father something or another, mother something, moving or something.  But everyone has multiple somethings -- and most people turn out okay.  This country has known times of war, long term and disruptive strikes, dreadful unemployment, working mothers always away from home -- and the kids, on average, are fine.  Tough things, kids.

I'm far more inclined to think it is about training.  Kids are designed to do one thing well -- learn where the boundaries are by pushing at them.  These kids have learnt that the boundaries are in one place, and then school comes along and they're so far into 'beyond the boundary' that they're uncontrollable.

I preferred the olden days.  Parent's were terrified that their children would be excluded, so would work bloody hard to ensure that they had reasonable behaviour.  And those that didn't have good behaviour just played truant.  These days we just moan that they've been traumatised.

The government loves to measure everything these days, sometimes with monetary equivalent -- I'd love to see the analysis of the cost of unruly behaviour, perhaps in terms of 'hours of education lost' for those unlucky to be in a class with one.  Perhaps 'millions of £s of GDP' for the impact of those lost hours on the country when those children who've been impacted by others' behaviour grow up.  Oh, but we'll never see this, because we're too worried about the poor child being traumatised by the father doing something or another.

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5 minutes ago, dgul said:

It is all cod-psychology.  Sure, there's a reason, but there's always a reason -- father something or another, mother something, moving or something.  But everyone has multiple somethings -- and most people turn out okay.  This country has known times of war, long term and disruptive strikes, dreadful unemployment, working mothers always away from home -- and the kids, on average, are fine.  Tough things, kids.

I'm far more inclined to think it is about training.  Kids are designed to do one thing well -- learn where the boundaries are by pushing at them.  These kids have learnt that the boundaries are in one place, and then school comes along and they're so far into 'beyond the boundary' that they're uncontrollable.

I preferred the olden days.  Parent's were terrified that their children would be excluded, so would work bloody hard to ensure that they had reasonable behaviour.  And those that didn't have good behaviour just played truant.  These days we just moan that they've been traumatised.

The government loves to measure everything these days, sometimes with monetary equivalent -- I'd love to see the analysis of the cost of unruly behaviour, perhaps in terms of 'hours of education lost' for those unlucky to be in a class with one.  Perhaps 'millions of £s of GDP' for the impact of those lost hours on the country when those children who've been impacted by others' behaviour grow up.  Oh, but we'll never see this, because we're too worried about the poor child being traumatised by the father doing something or another.

Top analysis. We never consider the impact on the innocent. Ever. 

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