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Frank Hovis

Consumerist rubbish

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In agreeing to receive emails from TalkTalk, my internet provider, I have been entered for a draw for the following:

Win a home entertainment bundle worth £2,700*
Tell us that you’d like to opt in (or out) by 25 May and we’ll pop you in our prize draw. You could win this huge bundle of tech:
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Samsung 49” SMART Full HD TV
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Samsung Galaxy Tab E 9.6” Tablet
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Amazon Kindle Wi-Fi 6”
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png SONOS PLAY:1 Smart Wireless Speaker
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Microsoft Xbox One X

 

What a load of rubbish. I want none of that and if I win it then my brother's family will be having a happy Christmas.

Do people actually aspire, and get into debt, to own this tat? I wouldn't give it house room.

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1 minute ago, Frank Hovis said:

In agreeing to receive emails from TalkTalk, my internet provider, I have been entered for a draw for the following:

Win a home entertainment bundle worth £2,700*
Tell us that you’d like to opt in (or out) by 25 May and we’ll pop you in our prize draw. You could win this huge bundle of tech:
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Samsung 49” SMART Full HD TV
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Samsung Galaxy Tab E 9.6” Tablet
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Amazon Kindle Wi-Fi 6”
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png SONOS PLAY:1 Smart Wireless Speaker
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Microsoft Xbox One X

 

What a load of rubbish. I want none of that and if I win it then my brother's family will be having a happy Christmas.

Do people actually aspire, and get into debt, to own this tat? I wouldn't give it house room.

Think though of the money you will save on Christmas presents 

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I feel offended. I’ve been with the internet provider now known as talk talk for almost 20 years and have not been offered to enter the prize draw.

I’m joking of course! I wouldn’t have any need for any of the prizes. Lots will enter though. I doubt there’s a cash option, I  prefer cash if I’m going to win a prize!

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An X-box, a TV and a tablet doesn’t seem wildly excessive.

If a Sonos is just a streaming speaker, that’s basically a radio that can play anything available on the internet. Given there’s fuck all on the radio and a vast wealth of material online, might be worthwhile.

For free, not for £2,700 obvs.

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1 minute ago, Economic Exile said:

I feel offended. I’ve been with the internet provider now known as talk talk for almost 20 years and have not been offered to enter the prize draw.

I’m joking of course! I wouldn’t have any need for any of the prizes. Lots will enter though. I doubt there’s a cash option, I  prefer cash if I’m going to win a prize!

Always cash.  Cash buys anything you could possibly want; including your freedom.

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2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm not a miserable git about it but tbf it doesn't get reciprocated.

👍 out of reps again. Tight buggers. 

4 minutes ago, Economic Exile said:

I feel offended. I’ve been with the internet provider now known as talk talk for almost 20 years and have not been offered to enter the prize draw.

I’m joking of course! I wouldn’t have any need for any of the prizes. Lots will enter though. I doubt there’s a cash option, I  prefer cash if I’m going to win a prize!

A kindle is good. You can read 50 shades and no one knows. o.OxD

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47 minutes ago, One percent said:

A kindle is good. You can read 50 shades and no one knows

But can you underline the good bits in red biro and pass it on? Assuming there are any good bits

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4 minutes ago, Panther said:

But can you underline the good bits in red biro and pass it on? Assuming there are any good bits

Well, yes you can, but when you then move to the next page it doesn’t make much sense. It night also damage the screen. 

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I entered a prize draw with Virgin Money today. Prize is a £100 gift card to spend at John Lewis. Better than a kick up the arse, I suppose.

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GDPR legislation comes into force on 25 May and after that they can't spam you unless you have positively consented to it. They can't even mail you to ask for consent for future spam campaigns. Getting maximum consents is all this is.

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52 minutes ago, ThePiltdownMan said:

GDPR legislation comes into force on 25 May and after that they can't spam you unless you have positively consented to it. They can't even mail you to ask for consent for future spam campaigns. Getting maximum consents is all this is.

I expect a load more big last minute investments from big corporations into big baits, to net more people into a forever-rolling-over-of-the-privilege to get to you.

Please don't shut us out forever!

 

---

Will I finally stop getting Barclay card applications, and Virgin Media bundle A4 sized letters (I probably have received about 50 of these) touting for business?

 

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2 hours ago, Panther said:

But can you underline the good bits in red biro and pass it on? Assuming there are any good bits

Yes you can highlight your favourite passages (pfnarr) and add notes.

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4 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

In agreeing to receive emails from TalkTalk, my internet provider, I have been entered for a draw for the following:

Win a home entertainment bundle worth £2,700*
Tell us that you’d like to opt in (or out) by 25 May and we’ll pop you in our prize draw. You could win this huge bundle of tech:
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Samsung 49” SMART Full HD TV
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Samsung Galaxy Tab E 9.6” Tablet
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Amazon Kindle Wi-Fi 6”
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png SONOS PLAY:1 Smart Wireless Speaker
eefa9ff9-e285-473b-a1cc-bf7fd46b3d6b.png Microsoft Xbox One X

 

What a load of rubbish. I want none of that and if I win it then my brother's family will be having a happy Christmas.

Do people actually aspire, and get into debt, to own this tat? I wouldn't give it house room.

If you win I'll take the TV. 

Littlewoods sell stuff on credit to, predominantly, poor people. The prices include the credit charges which are high - just guessing here - because of the amount of defaults.

Before you click this link, have a guess at the sort of mobile phones you'd imagine would be the best-sellers for such a group of people.

Now take a look.

https://www.littlewoods.com/electricals/mobile-phones/e/b/4856.end

Does that answer your question?

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28 minutes ago, DTMark said:

If you win I'll take the TV. 

Littlewoods sell stuff on credit to, predominantly, poor people. The prices include the credit charges which are high - just guessing here - because of the amount of defaults.

Before you click this link, have a guess at the sort of mobile phones you'd imagine would be the best-sellers for such a group of people.

Now take a look.

https://www.littlewoods.com/electricals/mobile-phones/e/b/4856.end

Does that answer your question?

Bloody hell. 1279 quid for an iphone.

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1 hour ago, Cunning Plan said:

Gdpr won't stop the spam. But it will bugger 1000s of small businesses.

Yet another move to ensure that only the large corporates can succeed.

You run a small business don’t you? Can you elaborate on the points? (I’m genuinely interested rather than saying you’re wrong).

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10 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

Cash buys anything you could possibly want; including your freedom.

I think this is true technically; however, you get a VERY poor exchange rate if you use cash.

Instead, you should buy freedom with sacrifice; just as you buy knowledge with suffering.

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@dgul

Top post. I think the position is that if you can't be 100% compliant then you might as well be 0% compliant. I didn't know half the issues you posted about (shopify, emailed payslips etc). Did you splash out on a course?

My biggest issue is that I have a list of about 3,000 customers, who buy from me once a year. 

They are businesses and therefore were OK for me to email a reminder to. 

Under GDPR, I now need to contact them to get their express permission to remind them when they normally buy.

Experience tells me that only 50% at best would reply to the permission request. That is half my customer base wiped out overnight.

The whole thing is overkill. And won't fix the problem it was meant to anyway.

 

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27 minutes ago, dgul said:

From my point of view there are loads of little problems.

Say you're a small guy.  Does gardening jobs for people, perhaps.  All of a sudden keeping a diary with the phone number of clients written down is GDPR -- you've got to get permission from each one.  Or maybe you make reeds for the contrabassoon -- it is pretty specialised and you like to have a book containing the specific requirements (hardness, tone, say) required for each customer.  Again, you'd need permission from each one, a policy of how to respond for customer requests for data, how to delete it (not just 'tear page from book', but how do you show that the policy was carried out if someone complains).  The list goes on.  Newspaper paper rounds, say -- you have to ensure that the data is held securely, but you normally give the paper boy a printout of the new customer addresses -- now you have to ensure that he's securely erased the data when he's finished with it.

These are all pretty trivial examples, but they show the reach of the law.  But the important thing to note is, it isn't just mailing lists for customers.  Now, there is a 'presumed permission' -- so if you're a hairdresser then it might be presumed that you need a list of appointments with telephone numbers just in case something changes -- but how is that 'presumption' defined?  Should you really speak with your solicitor about it?  So far I've had my accountant say that all the payslips for my company will now have to be securely sent as a link to a portal (with sign-in permission, etc) rather than just as an email (as it isn't secure enough for GDPR).  Oh, and there's an extra £££s to cover this, please.   My other company is still just emailing out payslips -- are we criminally stupid?  No-one has actually told me that this is stupid.  Maybe I should go back to printing each one out handing it over in person?  But people like the emailed payslips -- it is far easier to find them if you need them next year (for whatever reason).  I've also dropped myself off a potential customer's list because they demanded that I electronically sign a 'permission to hold my data' document (that'll be £200 for the signing certificate... I decided that they'll never buy my services and they looked like a hassle anyway).  Then there's business cards -- I suppose I'll still hand mine out, but what to do with cards handed to me at meetings?  Can I keep them?  Is there a presumption of permission because I've got one?  I might just have picked it up off the floor.  Am I allowed to put the data into my phone's number database?  I really don't know -- I don't think anyone really knows.

I've got a couple of Shopify sites.  Is Shopify itself compliant (encrypted hosting, etc).  I don't know -- the point is with Shopify that they sort out those sorts of hassles for you.  But then I do know that one (very small site) is set up to email me with customer details on every sale.  I know that that isn't compliant -- but it is B2B so maybe it is okay?  But Shopify definitely offer this for B2C, so maybe other parts of their offering isn't compliant?  And do I need to keep hold of the customer information for tax purposes?  Probably not.  Warranty purposes?  I suppose so.  Maybe it is enough that they've got a (broken) widget.  And how should I store this data?  Is my laptop compliant (it is encrypted, but just using the 'encrypt my data' button -- is that encryption of the required standard?)  What about my password management?  Perhaps I should just print out the customer details and keep the info in an old fashioned filing cabinet.

The point is maybe all this is required.  Maybe it is all stupid overkill.  No-one (small) knows as it is too complex to work out.  Everyone I know is either playing it safe (moving out of doing any marketing emails at all) or just ignoring it (keeping on writing down customer phone numbers for MOT appointments in the big book by the phone).

Big companies have it all worked out -- change website front-page to have a 'accept this' button, send out a circular email telling people that 'stuff' has changed, arranging lovely competitions where the mailing list people sign up to GDPR requirements as part of the T&Cs.  These guys have all got a GDPR person inside, and have bought a GDPR consultant in to work out what they need to do -- it works out as pennies per customer.  The small guys just can't afford that.   And what are the risks, do I really have to worry about it?  if I lose the piece of paper with the client's name and a map of how to get to them, is it going to be a £100 fine?  30% of annual turnover?  I don't know.  What about if I lose everyone's (all 100 of them) details?  I don't know.  Maybe they'll just ignore that sort of breach.  And maybe they wouldn't ignore it.   Anyway, I don't want to break the law -- but I can't work out how not to break this law.  

And it is so unnecessary.  Just like other laws, it would be easy to sort out -- make it a requirement for companies, but only for the direct marketing side.  Or perhaps have a turnover requirement before it kicks in.  And who are 'the bad guys' here -- is it the hairdresser telephoning you about your appointment?  The MoT place phoning up to say you've only got 1 month left?  (that one is definitely marketing).  The milkman writing down your new address on a slip of paper when you bump into him on a frosty morning?  Or is it the bucketfuls of junk mail every morning?  The endless phone calls?  The people you didn't even realise had your details and then lost them to a Russian hacker? No, just like every other time they've screw the small guy by mandating an extraordinary effort while allowing the big people to continue operating pretty much as usual.  And there won't be any benefit to any of it.

My fear is that in a while (next year?) we'll start hearing about small / medium sized companies being sued by people who say that their personal data has been abused.  And it won't matter that the complainant is wrong -- they'll not have the policies in place to prove the complainer wrong.  It'll all be done out of malice with a profit motive, but, hell, that's the sort of country we've got now.

In theory, the rumour goes (and it could just be that) that dashcams in cars would be in contravention of GDPR regs. You'd (in theory) need the express permission of everybody being filmed.

 

True or bollox?

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1 minute ago, Thombleached said:

In theory, the rumour goes (and it could just be that) that dashcams in cars would be in contravention of GDPR regs. You'd (in theory) need the express permission of everybody being filmed.

True or bollox?

Technically, yes.  The recordings might identify the individual (photo), details of their property (their car number plate) and where they were at a particular time.   But individuals aren't covered by GDPR, just 'companies' (including self-employed, etc).  So you can have the data, but a fleet operator might want to think about whether their recordings are compliant.  

My views on this:

  • Individuals -- shouldn't affect them.
  • Large companies -- well, someone like DHL might have to have a policy.  So, they'll get someone to write out what needs to be done -- a needs assessment (based on accidents over last 12 months, say), then a risk assessment, then a data handling assessment (what to do with normal data - erase daily; what to do with evidence - move onto secure server), then a hardware assessment (maybe cameras will be secured onto the dashboard to reduce theft risk).
  • SMEs -- What?  I just have a camera because of that scroat that crashed into me and said it was my fault?  What do I have to do?

And even then it is more complicated.  Say I drive my car to work, but the boss tells me to drive over to a customer site -- big emergency and the pool cars are out.  But I've got a dashcam that he doesn't know about...  I'm now driving for business purposes -- has the law been broken?

Again, this is crazy.  The law wasn't meant to cover this sort of thing.  

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