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Frank Hovis

How many people does it take to move a stone?

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It is an important stone, 6th century with inscriptions in Latin and IIRC Ogham and known as King Arthur's Stone.  It is at risk of falling into the River Camel as the earth under it i seroding into the river.  If it did so then the inscription would start wearing away.  This is where it is now.

King-Arthurs-stone-2JPG.jpg

This isn't its original location, some aristo put it there in the 18th century.  People never used to mind these things being moved just as the Stonehenge you see now was pretty much rebuilt by squaddies in the 1950s prior to which much of it had fallen down.

Now what would any reasonable person do here?  The stone has already been moved from its original location so I suggest that it gets lifted up to safely lie upon the rocky plateau above where it it currently lies.

Oh no.  Far too obvious.

What the 21st century's idea of efficiency in how to stop a stone falling into a river is:
 

Quote

 

To save the historic monument, Mr Parsons commissioned consulting engineers Attwell Associates for a study, funded with a grant from Historic England, to highlight the issues and identify a number of options for remedial works.

The report reads: “The project concluded that the stone will remain vulnerable and its position will deteriorate unless direct action is taken.”

To try to find a solution to save King Arthur’s Stone, the Arthurian Centre is organising an open day for the public to visit the historic site for free.

It will take place on May 27 and visitors will be given the opportunity to comment on options available for the conservation of the monument.

Mr Parsons concluded: “We wanted to get public participation.

“There were 12 different things [Attwell Associates] looked at, but now there are three options they are considering. So we are getting the public opinion this month, then the decision will be made by people in charge of the National Monuments.

“The works will take place within 12 months.”

 

Just bring in some lifting gear and lift the stone up to the plateau with a winch, it will take half day tops.

https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/countdown-begins-save-historic-king-1565833

 

 

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1 minute ago, LC1 said:

Durr! Move the river, obviously.

Get down there May 27th and register your view!

(it would be terribly amusing if a couple of hundred people visited and this is what each of them suggested)

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I was watching some history programme the other day - could have been 'Time Team' - where it was stated that only around 200,000 people lived in the UK when Stonehenge was built. They said that it would be a rare thing, outside of your tribe, to bump into other people back then.

Perhaps we were like penguins back then and would fall over backwards in surprise when we saw someone else.

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7 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It is an important stone, 6th century with inscriptions in Latin and IIRC Ogham and known as King Arthur's Stone.  It is at risk of falling into the River Camel as the earth under it i seroding into the river.  If it did so then the inscription would start wearing away.  This is where it is now.

 

 

That's not King Arthur's stone. This is.

Maen_Ceti_750px.jpg

For some reason our ancestors felt the need to carry a huge boulder to top of the tallest hill on Gower. I they must have been very bored in those days.

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Posted (edited)

Hard to get a decent idea of scale, but it doesn't look all that heavy, could four strong men not lift it?

Half an hour tops, then off to the pub for some refreshments.

£10 each, £100 each if it is done in a way which does not scratch, scrape or damage it in any way. Less than £500.

Edited by Carl Fimble
get a not gets

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22 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

That's not King Arthur's stone. This is.

For some reason our ancestors felt the need to carry a huge boulder to top of the tallest hill on Gower. I they must have been very bored in those days.

King Arthur is a bit like Wayland Smith; pops up eveywhere.

An interesting recent (I think) theory is that whilst King Arthur did pre-exist as a story, with semi-legendary status just like Robin Hood, the knights, round table, grail etc. are all grafted on from the actual court of Charlemagne where such things existed.  Well round table and knights anyway.

 

 

Re the early Neolithic population I think it unlikely that you would be going anywhere unarmed, if you bumped into someone it would be kill or be killed.  The battle of Crickley Hill is an awesome early tribal fight. 

We put the hippy trippy vibe upon prehistory that really wasn't there.  When Otzi the iceman was found there was for teh first few years the narrative that this happy wanderer had lost his way in the mountains.

A few years later the MRI scan of his body found the arrowhed that killed him.

1 minute ago, Carl Fimble said:

Hard to gets decent idea of scale, but it doesn't look all that heavy, could four strong men not lift it?

Half an hour tops, then off to the pub for some refreshments.

£10 each, £100 each if it is done in a way which does not scratch, scrape or damage it in any way. Less than £500.

Exactly!

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40 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

To save the historic monument, Mr Parsons commissioned consulting engineers Attwell Associates for a study, funded with a grant from Historic England, to highlight the issues and identify a number of options for remedial works.

The report reads: “The project concluded that the stone will remain vulnerable and its position will deteriorate unless direct action is taken.”

To try to find a solution to save King Arthur’s Stone, the Arthurian Centre is organising an open day for the public to visit the historic site for free.

It will take place on May 27 and visitors will be given the opportunity to comment on options available for the conservation of the monument.

Mr Parsons concluded: “We wanted to get public participation.

 

What a complete tool. 

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I've changed my mind. I now think the stone should be lifted onto a special stone removal lorry and transported to an Edinburgh stone specialist for cleaning.

 

 

My knowing a stone cleaning specialist in Edinburgh, and a stone removal lorry owner have not in any way influenced my change of heart. 

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One wonders how they managed to move this one around the country. Maybe they need to get the same experts on the case.

Image result for ed stone

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I think the Greeks should nick it.

Just now, DTMark said:

One wonders how they managed to move this one around the country. Maybe they need to get the same experts on the case.

Image result for ed stone

The very definition of a millstone.

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57 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It is an important stone, 6th century with inscriptions in Latin and IIRC Ogham and known as King Arthur's Stone.  It is at risk of falling into the River Camel as the earth under it i seroding into the river.  If it did so then the inscription would start wearing away.  This is where it is now.

King-Arthurs-stone-2JPG.jpg

This isn't its original location, some aristo put it there in the 18th century.  People never used to mind these things being moved just as the Stonehenge you see now was pretty much rebuilt by squaddies in the 1950s prior to which much of it had fallen down.

Now what would any reasonable person do here?  The stone has already been moved from its original location so I suggest that it gets lifted up to safely lie upon the rocky plateau above where it it currently lies.

Oh no.  Far too obvious.

What the 21st century's idea of efficiency in how to stop a stone falling into a river is:
 

Just bring in some lifting gear and lift the stone up to the plateau with a winch, it will take half day tops.

https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/countdown-begins-save-historic-king-1565833

Put it in the British Museum. It's high time they had some British artifacts in there.

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16 minutes ago, Anglepoise said:

Naively perhaps, I never knew about the many restorations of Stonehenge. Just found this series of photographs of the 1950s works:

https://fishki.net/46388-stroitelstvo-stounhendzha-108-foto.html

restavraciya-0046.jpg

"so ... we've dragged these stones all this way and were just going to whack a few on their ends and leave the rest lying around ?"

"dont worry in a couple of thousand years they will invent some gadget that can stack them up" 

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7 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Put it in the British Museum. It's high time they had some British artifacts in there.

I agree that I would put it in A museum to stop it being eroded.

If it was a monument standing where it had been first erected then it shoudl be left as it represents the past landscape but this has been put there as an 18th century garden ornament so its being in that particular location has no value.

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

Get down there May 27th and register your view!

(it would be terribly amusing if a couple of hundred people visited and this is what each of them suggested)

Better still go the night before and move it ,a turfer and a few nylon slings is all that`s needed 

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42 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Make sure your mates fill in a risk assessment and, prior to moving the stone, you follow GDPR rules by filling in a GPIA impact assessment to identify any possible breaches of GDPR.

Oh, and remember personal accident insurance, and public liability insurance.

Somebody with more time on their hands than me might decide that it would be rather a wheeze to pop down there one night and just move it up the slope the night before the open day....

"Um, the stone is no longer at risk of falling into the river as someone has moved it six feet away from said river.  We will be launching an eqnuiry into this heinous act!"

iI think you forgot the most important one LOLER and do you have a lift plan :D

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1 hour ago, Carl Fimble said:

Their consultation has probably cost over £500 already, I bet the whole thing ends up costing tens of thousands or more. Ridiculous. 

 

Tens of thousands? Dan and John Snow will be sniffing around then.

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