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Anyone running E85 in their car? There seem to be quite a few people who use this in their recent (non E85) engines with no issues. It is less than half the price of Lead Free 95.

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, davidg said:

Anyone running E85 in their car? There seem to be quite a few people who use this in their recent (non E85) engines with no issues. It is less than half the price of Lead Free 95.

Is this 85 Octane? I believe some modern engines can self-adjust for different octanes but I wouldn't try it in an old car.

Edited by Happy Renting

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5 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

Is this 85 Octane? I believe some modern engines can self-adjust for different octanes but I wouldn't try it in an old car.

Yes.

Apparently even modern non flex fuel cars can use it.

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Posted (edited)

 

1 hour ago, davidg said:

Yes.

Apparently even modern non flex fuel cars can use it.

I thought E85 was 85% Ethanol?

If so it has an octane rating of over 100, but a stoichiometric ratio of 9.8:1 as against 14.7:1 for normal fuel. I guess any car that runs closed loop fuelling and has 50% injector capacity in reserve should be OK with it...

 

Edit to say that: Ethanol can damage rubber bits in fuel systems, so there is also the possibility that it works OK for a bit, and then doesn't.

Edited by Rave

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5 minutes ago, Rave said:

 

I thought E85 was 85% Ethanol?

If so it has an octane rating of over 100, but a stoichiometric ratio of 9.8:1 as against 14.7:1 for normal fuel. I guess any car that runs closed loop fuelling and has 50% injector capacity in reserve should be OK with it...

 

Edit to say that: Ethanol can damage rubber bits in fuel systems, so there is also the possibility that it works OK for a bit, and then doesn't.

85% ethanol? More likely to be 15.

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Roger_Mellie said:

85% ethanol? More likely to be 15.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E85

Definitely 85% Ethanol. Basically if your car can run it and it's half the price of Petrol you'd be silly not to, even though it contains 33% less energy per unit than petrol does. If your car can increase its turbo boost and/or advance the ignition timing for more power/economy then so much the better.

But as with most things, its low price is all down to dubious tax incentives which could be taken away at any time. From a CO2 emissions point of view there's little or no advantage to it once you factor in the energy consumed in growing and distilling it. It burns cleaner than petrol and should produce fewer harmful emissions, but then so does LPG.

I've not seen it on sale in the UK for years, so it's a bit of a moot point for most of us.

Edited by Rave

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Hmmm... I could make 85% ethanol at home. Cheap polish vodka anyone?

Really surprised that people are running cars on this. I thought 10% was the maximum reccomended.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, davidg said:

Anyone running E85 in their car? There seem to be quite a few people who use this in their recent (non E85) engines with no issues. It is less than half the price of Lead Free 95.

Good point this. Don't know why a tight-arse like me hadn't thought of it before.

I don't spend a fortune on fuel, but why not save if I can? 68 Euro cents a litre in Ferney-Voltaire.....

Mind you it will make buying a hybrid or electric even more pointless.

Edit :- Looks like you have to convert the car. There's a cost of 4-500Euros for a kit, then  the zillions to pay the garage to do it (Swiss labour v pricey).

Not worth it for me as I am not spending a fortune on fuel. For someone doing a lot of miles in a car that is quite heavy on fuel it might be well worth it.

 

Edited by swiss_democracy_for_all
checked a bit

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I would really be careful putting it in your car if it's not designed for it. Do a bit of research first. If your model of car has a flex-fuel version (maybe in other markets) then it's likely to be fitted with an ethanol resistant fuel system at least, as it probably wouldn't make sense for the manufacturer to fit two different types of fuel pump, pipes etc. If other people are reporting running E85 in their car with no problems, then so much the better.

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It won't be 85 octane.  Most engines would blow up running on that.  I do have an old Lister stationary engine that would be fine, but that's got a compression ratio of 4.5:1 and will run on just about anything, including diesel (as a spark ignition, not as diesel ignition).

It will be almost neat ethanol, which in a normal car will work for a while and then stop working as every single seal in the fuel side of the engine stops sealing.

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How fancy !

Here in Wales we run our cars on discarded oil from fish shop fryers.

You'll sometimes be pulled into a layby when they have a purge on school run Mum's Land Rover Evoques and BMW X3s.

Other thing quite popular now is stopping 'supercars' to fine them for no front number plate. £100 I think ?

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4 minutes ago, Bedrag Justesen said:

How fancy !

Here in Wales we run our cars on discarded oil from fish shop fryers.

You'll sometimes be pulled into a layby when they have a purge on school run Mum's Land Rover Evoques and BMW X3s.

Other thing quite popular now is stopping 'supercars' to fine them for no front number plate. £100 I think ?

You can use sunflower oil, 80 cents a liter from Lidl. I don't have a diesel now but always used to get odd looks buying 45 liters at a time. Still they were even more annoyed to find all the empties in a shopping trolley in the carpark.

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Again, sorry to be a party pooper, but running straight vegetable oil in a modern direct injection diesel engine will work OK, but not for very long. For a start you risk blowing seals in the injector pump as it's more viscous than fossil diesel, but more worryingly, you risk gumming up the piston rings, which you will probably have cause to regret when that causes them to stop sealing, and allows the oil from the sump to get into the cylinders, where it will cause the engine to run away until it seizes or explodes.

Indirect injection engines should be fine. I ran my Mk1 Mondeo diesel on straight veg for a few tankfuls with no problems. Scrapped it soon afterwards for other reasons so I don't know how long it would have lasted for, though.

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If you've got a supercharged or turbocharged car then you can run e85 and turn up the boost and/or advance the ignition and make quite a lot more power than or normal petrol. There's a reason drag racers use alcohol.

You'll probably need bigger injectors and as other have said, the fuel system needs to be designed for alcohol.

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Cold war era Russian military vehicles are gasoline powered multi-fuel which basically means as long as there's some reasonable component of gasoline in the mix with almost any other liquid hydrocarbon down to crude oil they'll run. If not they'll just not run without damage.

If you were unfortunate enough to only have space on the drive for one Russian military vehicle I'd have to recommend the MZKT-79221 transporter erector launcher. I'm not sure if they are actually gasoline multifuel engined so take no responsibilty should your fuel bills creep up slightly over your current daily driver.

 

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27 minutes ago, SNACR said:

Cold war era Russian military vehicles are gasoline powered multi-fuel which basically means as long as there's some reasonable component of gasoline in the mix with almost any other liquid hydrocarbon down to crude oil they'll run. If not they'll just not run without damage.

If you were unfortunate enough to only have space on the drive for one Russian military vehicle I'd have to recommend the MZKT-79221 transporter erector launcher. I'm not sure if they are actually gasoline multifuel engined so take no responsibilty should your fuel bills creep up slightly over your current daily driver.

 

We need one of these to defend DOSBODS Island. Can you get us one and does it come with the ballistic missile?

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1 hour ago, shindigger said:

What about chucking some Millers in to every tank? My VVT Focus loves Millers. Vroom vroom.

Remember kids, beer and cars don't mix.

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