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Chewing Grass

Not a lot of people know this but...

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the ordinary burden of a camel is 750 lb. With this he will
travel at about 2 miles an hour for 15 to 18 hours a day,
continuing this service for weeks with only 1lb. of food and a pint
of watter daily.

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50 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

If you tie a rope around the world and then splice in a six foot extension you will be able to lift it a foot above the ground all the way round.

That is just brilliant. I will go and melt my son's brain with that now.

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7 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

That is just brilliant. I will go and melt my son's brain with that now.

Don't tell him the answer but it's the circumference of a cricle is 2 Pi R, or roughly 6R

So 2 Pi R + 6 ~ 6 x (R+1)

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Just now, Frank Hovis said:

Don't tell him the answer but it's the circumference of a cricle is 2 Pi R, or roughly 6R

So 2 Pi R + 6 ~ 6 x (R+1)

I prefer pi d

But it is one of those things that scientifically we know is correct but logically seems wrong.

There is now a major online argument taking place amongst his geek friends.

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I will also throw in an oldie but a goodie.

If you know a prize is behind one of three doors, you pick one, and one of the other doors is opened to show that there is nothing behind it, should you switch?

The answer is yes, every time.  Whilst intuitively you think it doesn't matter if you run through the nine possible options on a bit of paper (as I have done, what an exciting man I am) then you win two out of three times if you switch but only one in three if you don't.

What throws your thinking is the potential regret of picking the right one and switching from it.

3 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

I prefer pi d

But it is one of those things that scientifically we know is correct but logically seems wrong.

There is now a major online argument taking place amongst his geek friends.

Give hiem the next one without the answer!

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25 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I will also throw in an oldie but a goodie.

If you know a prize is behind one of three doors, you pick one, and one of the other doors is opened to show that there is nothing behind it, should you switch?

The answer is yes, every time.  Whilst intuitively you think it doesn't matter if you run through the nine possible options on a bit of paper (as I have done, what an exciting man I am) then you win two out of three times if you switch but only one in three if you don't.

What throws your thinking is the potential regret of picking the right one and switching from it.

Give hiem the next one without the answer!

That does depend on if the door opened is totally random or the person opening the door will only pick one of the empty ones (I.e. no chance of them picking the winning door)

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

If you tie a rope around the world and then splice in a six foot extension you will be able to lift it a foot above the ground all the way round.

That's nice, but exactly how long is a piece of String?

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1 minute ago, Sucralose Ray Leonard said:

That's nice, but exactly how long is a piece of String?

You need to check out the stitch poking out of finger thread to answer that one 

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

If you tie a rope around the world and then splice in a six foot extension you will be able to lift it a foot above the ground all the way round.

If you took all the chips eaten in Newcastle on a Friday night and laid them end to end they would reach.....

....out and grab all the chips back.

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15 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

That does depend on if the door opened is totally random or the person opening the door will only pick one of the empty ones (I.e. no chance of them picking the winning door)

I am assuming that they will only open one of the empty ones.

Surely that's implicit as you have the chance to switch so if they show you where the prize is then you just switch to the one with the prize.

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

If you tie a rope around the world and then splice in a six foot extension you will be able to lift it a foot above the ground all the way round.

But the planet is expanding and contracting due to gravitational pull of other solar bodies....so you need to change your calculation a bit.

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5 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I am assuming that they will only open one of the empty ones.

Surely that's implicit as you have the chance to switch so if they show you where the prize is then you just switch to the one with the prize.

It's not implicit and it changes the odds.

My lad isn't stupid. I need to be beyond reproach with this kind of thing if I am to retain guru status (in my dreams)

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1 minute ago, Cunning Plan said:

It's not implicit and it changes the odds.

My lad isn't stupid. I need to be beyond reproach with this kind of thing if I am to retain guru status (in my dreams)

:D

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in the year 1859 there were 1,282 alarms of fire in London. Of these 102 were chimneys on fire, and 91 were false alarms, leaving 1,089 actual fires. Of these, 273, or one-fourth, were extinguisable by the unaided exertions of the inmates, 409 were extinguished with casual assistance, whilst the extinction of 407 devolved upon the fire brigade .

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1 minute ago, Cunning Plan said:

I asked. He already knew that one.

I need to be smarter tomorrow.

I'm impressed.  As my old maths teacher said probability is the litmus test of the mathematician.  Any rote learner can follow rules and formulae but perms and combs requires actual intelligence.

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When 23 people are gathered, there is more chance than not that 2 of them have the same birthday

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Just now, Frank Hovis said:

I'm impressed.  As my old maths teacher said probability is the litmus test of the mathematician.  Any rote learner can follow rules and formulae but perms and combs requires actual intelligence.

I love probability. I guess he got tired of losing his pocket money on dead cert bets that weren't.

 

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4 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

in the year 1859 there were 1,282 alarms of fire in London. Of these 102 were chimneys on fire, and 91 were false alarms, leaving 1,089 actual fires. Of these, 273, or one-fourth, were extinguisable by the unaided exertions of the inmates, 409 were extinguished with casual assistance, whilst the extinction of 407 devolved upon the fire brigade .

I knew that! (he lied)

1 minute ago, lid said:

When 23 people are gathered, there is more chance than not that 2 of them have the same birthday

I'd heard similar, I must work the numbers on that because it seems so unlikely.

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