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201p

Solent Uni Art

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I think the first one is weird but there is something to it. The rest could be bettered by your average three year olds scribble stuck on a fridge. 

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'Including painting, video, audio and sculpture Mandy, a 46 year old mum of two, said the range of work in this year's show is "exciting." '

'After she was diagnosed with synovial sarcoma - or cancer in her shoulder joint - she was forced to reduce her hours at work. '

Its just the dole with paint brushes.

There's a huge number of older students doing this sort of stuff.

The chances of the loan being paid back are ...... 0.

Relly need to tie HE funding to he number of previous students paying back their loan.

 

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2 minutes ago, spygirl said:

'Including painting, video, audio and sculpture Mandy, a 46 year old mum of two, said the range of work in this year's show is "exciting." '

'After she was diagnosed with synovial sarcoma - or cancer in her shoulder joint - she was forced to reduce her hours at work. '

Its just the dole with paint brushes.

There's a huge number of older students doing this sort of stuff.

The chances of the loan being paid back are ...... 0.

Relly need to tie HE funding to he number of previous students paying back their loan.

 

xD

 

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28 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I think if anyone produced something like this on that course then they would probably be expelled for wilful insolence.

 

Art is no longer an art

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, spygirl said:

'Including painting, video, audio and sculpture Mandy, a 46 year old mum of two, said the range of work in this year's show is "exciting." '

'After she was diagnosed with synovial sarcoma - or cancer in her shoulder joint - she was forced to reduce her hours at work. '

Its just the dole with paint brushes.

There's a huge number of older students doing this sort of stuff.

The chances of the loan being paid back are ...... 0.

Relly need to tie HE funding to he number of previous students paying back their loan.

 

The number of mature students stuck out immediately as did the complete rubbish they have produced

What is the cost of the course to the student overall, £40k ?

There are 20 people in the group photo, so, for easy maths, those exhibits cost £800k, which as you say will not get repaid by them but by someone else.

A pointless course and a pointless product by pointless people.

 

 

Edited by Hopeful

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41 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

The number of mature students stuck out immediately as did the complete rubbish they have produced

What is the cost of the course to the student overall, £40k ?

There are 20 people in the group photo, so, for easy maths, those exhibits cost £800k, which as you say will not get repaid by them but by someone else.

A pointless course and a pointless product by pointless people.

 

 

For the student? ZIlch nada, none, zero.

UK taxpayer? - 800k.

Again, why future funding of HE most depend on the whether 80% of students are paying back their loans within 3 years of graduating.

 

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Posted (edited)

I liked a surprising amount of the stuff in Tate Modern. It's an ambience thing really but there is nothing new going on with this lot.

Edited by Panther

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2 hours ago, Hopeful said:

The number of mature students stuck out immediately as did the complete rubbish they have produced

What is the cost of the course to the student overall, £40k ?

There are 20 people in the group photo, so, for easy maths, those exhibits cost £800k, which as you say will not get repaid by them but by someone else.

A pointless course and a pointless product by pointless people.

 

 

Its a ax credit thing.

This a is piss poor ex FE Uni.

The course will struggle to get anyone to join, so they open the intake to anyone who's art abiliy stopped around age 8.

They 'go to Uni' the DSS is told 'Im at Uni - for a FT occupation.

Uni gets its fresh bodies for funding, lectureres get paid.

Everyone is happy - bar the poor fucker paying for this crap

 

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8 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

I think if anyone produced something like this on that course then they would probably be expelled for wilful insolence.

1024px-Turner,_J._M._W._-_The_Fighting_T

This is my favourite Turner painting. I had not heard of it until a few years ago, when I read about it in a Sunday Magazine.

A day or two later, as it so happened, I visited the National Gallery. I entered one room, turned to face the wall, and found myself face-to-face with The Fighting Temeraire, which was quite a surprise. I had no idea it was there. And I had it to myself in a quiet gallery for a few minutes.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Happy Renting said:

This is my favourite Turner painting. I had not heard of it until a few years ago, when I read about it in a Sunday Magazine.

A day or two later, as it so happened, I visited the National Gallery. I entered one room, turned to face the wall, and found myself face-to-face with The Fighting Temeraire, which was quite a surprise. I had no idea it was there. And I had it to myself in a quiet gallery for a few minutes.

I had a similar moment with Holman's Hunt's painting The Light of the World in Manchester art gallery. 

I had seen it before in prints, but did not know it was there in its original - I just turned round and saw it; it is an absolutely amazing painting which no print or reproduction can do justice to because it seems to glow from light from within the canvas. 

I find it difficult to understand why anyone is interested in piles of old tat and splodges on walls when art like that exists, but I suspect there has been something of a campaign to denigrate and discredit 'proper' art for many years now. 

Edited by Austin Allegro

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In my previous life as a housemistress in a private boarding school one of my charges was doing art GCSE.  As a piss take for his course work he found a knackerered old chair and nailed some orange peel to it.  A*.

An A level pupil put some of her pubic hairs in a glass drawer.  A*.

The head of art herself was awarded a 1st from Falmouth for her pre menstrual tent.  The academic staff referred to her as the magic fairy as the kids’ unfinished shite miraculously was completed during the night.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Happy Renting said:

This is my favourite Turner painting. I had not heard of it until a few years ago, when I read about it in a Sunday Magazine.

A day or two later, as it so happened, I visited the National Gallery. I entered one room, turned to face the wall, and found myself face-to-face with The Fighting Temeraire, which was quite a surprise. I had no idea it was there. And I had it to myself in a quiet gallery for a few minutes.

You should enjoy this

I had a great admiration for Tom Keating for his knowledge and skill, the art world less so due to his excellent works by the masters

Here, Tom Keating paints The Fighting Temeraire

 

Edited by Hopeful

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12 hours ago, 201p said:

Well, what do you think?

Derivative and third rate.

I know "good artists copy, great artists steal"...

But I've seen these concepts executed with significantly more flair first (and even second) time round.

It's like someone copying a child's crayon facsimile of the Mona Lisa under the illusion that all three have equal artistic merit.

There is good modern art out there which speaks to you with an inner resonance that has been crafted by the artist.

However, it amuses me that at every degree show I've been invited to, it's often artists who get lower seconds who produce stuff that grandmas will put on their kitchen wall. They usually sell all their exhibition pieces.

But I can understand the frustration of a painter who doesn't want to paint the chocolate box cottage garden scene for the 1500th time; they want to expand their range, develop their artistic voice in different media; explore new dimensions in artistic expression. But that doesn't put bread on the table. Many of us who create; whether it's software, words or mathematical models; feel that tension and dream. 

I've seen two films about artists recently. Loving Vincent, I'd recommend - a sympathetic portrayal of a complex, misunderstood character. Gaugin - voyage de Tahiti, I'm not so sure. I left feeling he was a stubborn fool who destroyed what good he had going for him by his obstinate refusal to compromise. 

Does that make me a curmudgeon?

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4 hours ago, Ina said:

In my previous life as a housemistress in a private boarding school one of my charges was doing art GCSE.  As a piss take for his course work he found a knackerered old chair and nailed some orange peel to it.  A*.

An A level pupil put some of her pubic hairs in a glass drawer.  A*.

The head of art herself was awarded a 1st from Falmouth for her pre menstrual tent.  The academic staff referred to her as the magic fairy as the kids’ unfinished shite miraculously was completed during the night.

Did you, you know, dress up sternly?

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I have been at the commercial end of creativity for years and I either admire or detest ‘artists’ depending on if I think they are actually talented or just being ‘arty’ dicks riding off the back of the talented folk. I have met more of the latter.

Installation art is an interesting one. I have seen many but only find the ones that fuck with my senses interest me.

Stuck my head into a hole only to see someone running up behind me with a baseball bat on the TV inside the hole! Scary as fuck - yes. Creative - yes. Art - no comment.

Walked into a white room with rounded corners (bit like a photographers scoop), shut the white door and your normal sense of spatial awareness go haywire. Weird as fuck - yes. Creative - yes. Art - no comment.

Saatchi Gallery exhibition. Room full of extremely realistic old folk in electric wheelchairs with anti-collision sensors. Walked down amongst them only to be surrounded and staring down at old persons nose veins - it was the near-death realism that really gave you the heebie jeebies and the fear that they were about to kill you like in some bad horror film. Unnerving - yes. Creative - yes. Art - no comment.

Like anything, the good ideas filter into the commercial world and benefit the creative industry. The bad ones need to be told they are shit and should try something else.

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10 hours ago, Melchett said:

The first looks like a load of balls.

The rest don’t even have the opportunity to make a joke about them going for them.

I have given you a rev-ballsack for that 😂

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Happy Renting said:

This is my favourite Turner painting. I had not heard of it until a few years ago, when I read about it in a Sunday Magazine.

A day or two later, as it so happened, I visited the National Gallery. I entered one room, turned to face the wall, and found myself face-to-face with The Fighting Temeraire, which was quite a surprise. I had no idea it was there. And I had it to myself in a quiet gallery for a few minutes.

Turner was lambasted at the time for some of his art:

Madman or Master:

http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/articles/madman-or-master

And this, “he upset the establishment”:

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/display/turner-collection/introduction-to-turner

His late style, with its energetic brushwork and relative lack of descriptive details, combined with his modern subject matter, surprised many. Even some of his most devoted patrons, such as John Ruskin were bemused. 

Edit: My boring art history classes must have actually sunk into the grey matter!

Edited by OurDayWillCome

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Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, OurDayWillCome said:

I have been at the commercial end of creativity for years and I either admire or detest ‘artists’ depending on if I think they are actually talented or just being ‘arty’ dicks riding off the back of the talented folk. I have met more of the latter.

Installation art is an interesting one. I have seen many but only find the ones that fuck with my senses interest me.

Stuck my head into a hole only to see someone running up behind me with a baseball bat on the TV inside the hole! Scary as fuck - yes. Creative - yes. Art - no comment.

Walked into a white room with rounded corners (bit like a photographers scoop), shut the white door and your normal sense of spatial awareness go haywire. Weird as fuck - yes. Creative - yes. Art - no comment.

Saatchi Gallery exhibition. Room full of extremely realistic old folk in electric wheelchairs with anti-collision sensors. Walked down amongst them only to be surrounded and staring down at old persons nose veins - it was the near-death realism that really gave you the heebie jeebies and the fear that they were about to kill you like in some bad horror film. Unnerving - yes. Creative - yes. Art - no comment.

Like anything, the good ideas filter into the commercial world and benefit the creative industry. The bad ones need to be told they are shit and should try something else.

Gilbert and George - No fucking comment - the insert of fucking seemed appropriate

I assume you know Mona - I'd gamble you'd also say no comment

Animals in formalin, - No different to my laboratory, no comment

No comment to any of the tat that has appeared on the 4th Plinth

Etcetera

I do quite like Peter Randall Page's work, such as his latest The One and the Many

Edited by Hopeful

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