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sarahbell

New diet idea

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Well, given that eating plastic fills animals stomachs and they no longer eat and then waste away... could this be used as a method of getting fatties to get slim?
 

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4 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

Well, given that eating plastic fills animals stomachs and they no longer eat and then waste away... could this be used as a method of getting fatties to get slim?
 

I'm sure they already do similar; inflated balloon in the stomach to reduce its size.

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2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm sure they already do similar; inflated balloon in the stomach to reduce its size.

So no one gets fed chopped up plastic bags? ;-/
Shame.

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2 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

So no one gets fed chopped up plastic bags? ;-/
Shame.

We probably all are by eating meat or fish as the traces seem to get everywhere.

One more bit of superiority for the vegans.

Stomach%20Balloon.jpg?cb=b1e37c8fd2b3911

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Posted (edited)
26 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

Well, given that eating plastic fills animals stomachs and they no longer eat and then waste away... could this be used as a method of getting fatties to get slim?
 

You'd be surprised at the amount of plastic you consume. It's in your bottled* and tap water, from abrasion from any plastic cooking utensils you use, from contamination from food packaging, from seafood where you eat the gut (e.g. sardines, shrimps, mussels etc). It's even in your sea salt, if you use sea salt.

The biggest long-term concern to me though is not the plastic that passes through the tube from your mouth to anus, but the presence of microfibres, mainly from fleece clothing, that are found in the deep lung.

*wouldn't touch the stuff unless it's in glass

Edited by Hopeful

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, eight said:

Not me. I have Lego for breakfast.

Any chance you could shit me out one of these later?

Ta in advance

327376933b01a230ffe4673b1a389c1a.jpg

Edited by SNACR

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, SNACR said:

Any chance you could shit me out one of these later?

Ta in advance

327376933b01a230ffe4673b1a389c1a.jpg

That combo seems massively overspec'd for that digger sorry, excavator... just looks odd.

Edited by Cosmic Apple

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3 minutes ago, Cosmic Apple said:

That combo seems massively overspec'd for that digger sorry, excavator... just looks odd.

I thought you put overspiced...

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2 minutes ago, Cosmic Apple said:

That combo seems massively overspec'd for that digger sorry, excavator... just looks odd.

STGO category 1 maximum although on that combination a lot of the axle payload of the prime mover is taken up with the weight of the Hiab 

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49 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

Well, given that eating plastic fills animals stomachs and they no longer eat and then waste away... could this be used as a method of getting fatties to get slim?
 

I lost 2 stone after christmas with a radical new diet, it was the "eat less ya fat bastard diet".

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Just now, TheCountOfNowhere said:

I lost 2 stone after christmas with a radical new diet, it was the "eat less ya fat bastard diet".

:-)

For some the t-rex diet is needed =- shorten their arms so they can't put food in their mouths...

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9 minutes ago, SNACR said:

STGO category 1 maximum although on that combination a lot of the axle payload of the prime mover is taken up with the weight of the Hiab 

Hmm... I understood most of the words individually.

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52 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

You'd be surprised at the amount of plastic you consume. It's in your bottled* and tap water, from abrasion from any plastic cooking utensils you use, from contamination from food packaging, from seafood where you eat the gut (e.g. sardines, shrimps, mussels etc). It's even in your sea salt, if you use sea salt.

The biggest long-term concern to me though is not the plastic that passes through the tube from your mouth to anus, but the presence of microfibres, mainly from fleece clothing, that are found in the deep lung.

*wouldn't touch the stuff unless it's in glass

Should we give up on wearing fleece tops, or is it pointless because there's enough in the general environment that it won't make any difference?

 

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, SpectrumFX said:

Should we give up on wearing fleece tops, or is it pointless because there's enough in the general environment that it won't make any difference?

 

If we stop now, there will be less one day in the future. At a personal level I would, but I haven't done so myself O.o

There are some interesting new wool alternatives coming onto the market, like TechMerino, but they are priced at the high end. But, as Polyester fleece is very cheap people tend to own several, a different approach would be to own one well made, well designed, fashionable wool (or similar natural material that doesn't absorb water) product so that the total cost outlay is little different.

Edited by Hopeful

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18 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

If we stop now, there will be less one day in the future. At a personal level I would, but I haven't done so myself O.o

There are some interesting new wool alternatives coming onto the market, like TechMerino, but they are priced at the high end. But, as Polyester fleece is very cheap people tend to own several, a different approach would be to own one well made, well designed, fashionable wool (or similar natural material that doesn't absorb water) product so that the total cost outlay is little different.

Fair enough. In won't buy any more, but I'll keep the ones I have 'till they're done.

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1 hour ago, Hopeful said:

You'd be surprised at the amount of plastic you consume. It's in your bottled* and tap water, from abrasion from any plastic cooking utensils you use, from contamination from food packaging, from seafood where you eat the gut (e.g. sardines, shrimps, mussels etc). It's even in your sea salt, if you use sea salt.

The biggest long-term concern to me though is not the plastic that passes through the tube from your mouth to anus, but the presence of microfibres, mainly from fleece clothing, that are found in the deep lung.

*wouldn't touch the stuff unless it's in glass

So all these marvellous companies that are recycling plastic bottles into fleeces are actually trying to kill us?
 

Quote

 

Do you know what happens to the plastic bottles after you dispose them? Yes, they are recycled to make a lot of things. Maybe, bottles again, plastic packets, containers and various other things. Or maybe, they are turned into a fabric you can wear. Strange is it? …Absolutely not. Plastic fabric or fleece as it is called is made from recycled plastic bottles. But, how is fleece made of plastic bottles? It is an extensive process, definitely but it is definitely worth it. Generally, it takes about 25 disposed plastic bottles to make enough polar fleeces for an adult to sew a piece of clothing out of it.

Fleece is very similar to wool. Rather, it has all the qualities of wool but it weighs much lighter. So next time if you plan to get warm clothing for yourself, let the sheep have their woolens. Go for polar fleece. Fleece is made from recycled plastic bottles and petroleum. And without a doubt, the material is highly flammable. But, being comfortable, light weight and water resistant, fleece is becoming very popular these days. To explain in easy words, polar fleece is made by forcing liquid plastic through tiny holes. When the plastic cools, they become threads, which are then used to make fabric.

 

http://www.snvplastics.com/how-is-fleece-made-of-plastic-bottles/

A similar point came up with the anti-fur debate.  If fashion insists on using fur but for ethical reasons (of which I approve) won't use real fur then it's creating vast amounts of plastic fibres which are damaging to the environment whilst raising, killing, and skinning a mink is a perfectly natural sustainable process.

It's back to it being that if our use of plastic is genuinely massively damaging the environment then surely we ought not to be using it whenever there is a natural alternative.

So everyone should be wearing leather shoes, have leather seats in their car etc.

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

So all these marvellous companies that are recycling plastic bottles into fleeces are actually trying to kill us?
 

http://www.snvplastics.com/how-is-fleece-made-of-plastic-bottles/

A similar point came up with the anti-fur debate.  If fashion insists on using fur but for ethical reasons (of which I approve) won't use real fur then it's creating vast amounts of plastic fibres which are damaging to the environment whilst raising, killing, and skinning a mink is a perfectly natural sustainable process.

It's back to it being that if our use of plastic is genuinely massively damaging the environment then surely we ought not to be using it whenever there is a natural alternative.

So everyone should be wearing leather shoes, have leather seats in their car etc.

 

Unintended consequences

Can be a bugger

Edited by Hopeful

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